7.1/10
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198 user 30 critic

The Fountainhead (1949)

Approved | | Drama, Romance | 2 July 1949 (USA)
An uncompromising, visionary architect struggles to maintain his integrity and individualism despite personal, professional and economic pressures to conform to popular standards.

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Writers:

(screenplay), (novel)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
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Chairman
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Alvah Scarret
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Storyline

Individualistic and idealistic architect Howard Roark is expelled from college because his designs fail to fit with existing architectural thinking. He seems unemployable but finally lands a job with like-minded Henry Cameron, however within a few years Cameron drinks himself to death, warning Roark that the same fate awaits unless he compromises his ideals. Roark is determined to retain his artistic integrity at all costs. Written by Col Needham <col@imdb.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The great best seller made greater on the screen by Warner Bros. See more »

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

2 July 1949 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Le rebelle  »

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The window view from Henry Cameron and Howard Roark's office appear to place the office in the Hudson Terminal office building, which later would become the site of New York's World Trade Center. See more »

Goofs

When Dominique is taking the construction elevator to the top of the skyscraper, the camera (as if from Dominique's perspective) zooms in slowly to the top of the building but there is no elevator shaft. See more »

Quotes

Peter Keating: You can't hope to survive unless you learn how to compromise. Now, watch me! In just a few short years I'll shoot to the top of the architectural profession because I'm going to give the public what it wants.
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Connections

Referenced in Identity Thief (2013) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Oil and Water
25 May 2011 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

I fear that giving Ayn Rand full control over what was said on screen turned what might have been an interesting film into nothing more than an extension of her book. Now that might sound a good thing, but film and book are two different media that rarely sit comfortably with one another. Strangely it is this refusal to compromise, an important point in the book, that is this films biggest flaw.

While the acting is fine, aside from Coopers and Neal's in my opinion, the dialogue is stilted and stands out of place on screen, almost to the point of preaching rather than aiding the development of the story.

This might be simply a sign of the times, after all this was made in 1948, but this film stands out in my mind as perhaps the pinnacle of 'straight from the book to film' type of writing.

The film isn't subtle by any means, its point is pushed down your throat time and time again, the price of having your writer push an agenda.

It seems like every other line is a speech rather than a genuine conversation, with constant swings back and forth from over the top melodrama to meaningless contrite phrases.

As a book, without the aid of background music and the delivery of a host of different actors I'm sure this works fine, but as a film it just becomes noise with all meaning lost.


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