6.3/10
125
16 user 1 critic

The Crime Doctor's Diary (1949)

Approved | | Crime, Drama | 30 March 1950 (Australia)
Dr. Ordway tries to prove that his patient was framed for arson.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (story) | 2 more credits »
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Cast

Cast overview:
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Steve Carter
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Jane Darrin
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Inez Gray
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George 'Goldie' Harrigan
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Phillip Bellem
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Pete Bellem
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Storyline

Dr. Ordway tries to prove that his patient was framed for arson.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Crime | Drama

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

30 March 1950 (Australia)  »

Also Known As:

A Voz do Morto  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Connections

Follows Just Before Dawn (1946) See more »

Soundtracks

A Little Brass French Horn
(uncredited)
Music by Paul Mertz
Lyrics by Edward Anhalt
Sung by Whit Bissell
See more »

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User Reviews

Toot toot
12 May 2007 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

One thing that makes this final entry in the Crime Doctor series better than average, aside from the interesting collection of players, is the writing, a mixture of 1940s crime dramas with a few throwbacks to 1930s comedies.

On one hand we have a spattering of old-timey cops-and-robbers lingo, with terms like "moll," "dip," "binnie", "pigeon," and "prowl car". Plus, there's the gratuitous use of firepower to pursue an obviously unarmed suspect which wouldn't be tolerated in today's televised police procedure.

On the other hand there are several laugh-out-loud zingers and one-liners that are clever in context but would make no sense if repeated here.

With a less convoluted plot than previous entries in the series, there is still a sufficient number of suspects to keep one guessing as to the perpetrator; but this tale depends less on our good doctor's crime-solving abilities than on a device introduced midway through the action at which one's immediate reaction is "evidence".


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