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A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court (1949)

 -  Comedy | Family | Fantasy  -  22 April 1949 (USA)
6.7
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Ratings: 6.7/10 from 1,404 users  
Reviews: 22 user | 8 critic

A singing mechanic from 1912 finds himself in Arthurian Britain.

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Title: A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court (1949)

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court (1949) on IMDb 6.7/10

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
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...
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Lord Pendragon / King Arthur (as Sir Cedric Hardwicke)
...
Murvyn Vye ...
Virginia Field ...
Joseph Vitale ...
Sir Logris
...
Richard Webb ...
...
High Executioner
Julia Faye ...
Lady Penelope
Mary Field ...
Peasant woman
Ann Carter ...
Peasant girl
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Storyline

A bump on the head sends Hank Martin, 1912 mechanic, to Arthurian Britain, 528 A.D., where he is befriended by Sir Sagramore le Desirous and gains power by judicious use of technology. He and Alisande, the King's niece, fall in love at first sight, which draws unwelcome attention from her fiancée Sir Lancelot; but worse trouble befalls when Hank meddles in the kingdom's politics. Written by Rod Crawford <puffinus@u.washington.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Its laughter will ring through the centuries!


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Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

22 April 1949 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Recording)

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The filmmakers couldn't use the musical's original score because it had already been purchased for use in Words and Music (1948), a Richard Rodgers tribute. See more »

Goofs

Stirrups (in Europe - 8th century and later), battlemented castles (12th century and later); full plate armour (14th century and later); spyglass (17th century); and fractured 16th century grammar. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Hank Martin: Here ya are.
[pays taxi driver]
Hank Martin: Hey, has this castle always had four turrets?
Pendragon Castle door man: Always.
See more »


Soundtracks

IF YOU STUB YOUR TOE ON THE MOON
Music by Jimmy Van Heusen (as James Van Heusen)
Lyrics by Johnny Burke
Sung by Bing Crosby and child chorus
See more »

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User Reviews

Did knights speak Brooklynese?!
23 June 2004 | by (Liverpool, England) – See all my reviews

I watched this merry movie the other day and enjoyed it

immensely, even though it was about the hundreth time I'd seen it.

It's a wonderful 'family' movie, in that it isn't offensive or overlong-

it's fun. My favourite part has to be the song "busy doing nothing", sung by

the unlikely trio of Bing Crosby, Cedric Hardwicke and William

Bendix (the first and last time they ever sang together!). There are nice touches all the way through, including the 'echoes'

every time king Arthur requests something: "MORE HOT WATER! . . . more hot water. . ." Or "CLOSE THE DOOR! . . .close the door. . ."

to which Murvyn Vye's Merlin replies, "the door closeth sire." While we are on the subject of Merlin, I'm surprised that with a

voice like his he didn't appear in more of Hollywood's costumers.

I've only ever seen him in one other film, and that was 'Green Fire'

(1955). Of course, I have to mention William Bendix's portrayal of 'Saggy' or

sir Sagramore. He turns up in Bing Crosby's prison cell

shame-faced and apologetic for calling him (Crosby) a dragon and

says the following: Saggy: If only there were ought we could do. Crosby: Well, ain't there ought? Saggy: Nought. Whoever heard of a knight of the round table with a thick Brooklyn

accent?! I usually detest musicals but this, along with 'White Christmas', is

an exception. The duet between Rhonda Fleming and Bing Crosby

('Once and for always') is brilliant. It's hilarious when he says she's

pretty, to which she replies enthusiatically, "oh, thou art pretty too

sire!" and he, looking round apprehensively says, "no, say I'm cute

or something!"


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