IMDb > Battleground (1949)
Battleground
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Battleground (1949) More at IMDbPro »

Photos (See all 6 | slideshow)

Overview

User Rating:
7.6/10   4,546 votes »
Your Rating:
Saving vote...
Deleting vote...
/10   (delete | history)
Sorry, there was a problem
MOVIEmeter: ?
Up 250% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writer:
Robert Pirosh (story)
Contact:
View company contact information for Battleground on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
20 January 1950 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
The First Great Picture Of The Second World War ! See more »
Plot:
A squad of the 101st Airborne Division copes with being trapped in the besieged city of Bastogne during the Battle of the Bulge. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Awards:
Won 2 Oscars. Another 3 wins & 5 nominations See more »
NewsDesk:
(17 articles)
User Reviews:
Christmas crisis in the Ardennes, December 1944 See more (65 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Van Johnson ... Holley
John Hodiak ... Jarvess

Ricardo Montalban ... Roderigues

George Murphy ... 'Pop' Stazak

Marshall Thompson ... Jim Layton
Jerome Courtland ... Abner Spudler
Don Taylor ... Standiferd
Bruce Cowling ... Wolowicz

James Whitmore ... Kinnie

Douglas Fowley ... 'Kipp' Kippton

Leon Ames ... The Chaplain
Herbert Anderson ... Hansan (as Guy Anderson)
Thomas E. Breen ... Doc

Denise Darcel ... Denise

Richard Jaeckel ... Bettis

James Arness ... Garby (as Jim Arness)
Scotty Beckett ... William J. Hooper
Brett King ... Lt. Teiss
The Screaming Eagles of the 101st Airborne Division ... Themselves (as the original 'Screaming Eagles' of the 101st Airborne Division)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Joel Allen ... Transportation Captain (uncredited)
Martha Bamattre ... French Peasant Woman (uncredited)
Richard Bartlett ... Casualty (uncredited)
Nan Boardman ... Belgian Woman Volunteer (uncredited)
Tommy Bond ... Runner (uncredited)
Robert Boon ... German Soldier (uncredited)
Michael Browne ... Levenstein (uncredited)
Norman Budd ... Crying Casualty (uncredited)
George Chandler ... Mess Sergeant (uncredited)
Tony Christian ... German Soldier (uncredited)
Lillian Clayes ... Old Woman (uncredited)
Louise Colombet ... French Peasant Woman (uncredited)
Gene Coogan ... G.I. Scout (uncredited)
Bert Davidson ... 101st Battalion Officer (uncredited)
George Dee ... Frenchman (uncredited)
Jean Del Val ... French Peasant Man (uncredited)
Victor Desny ... Wounded German Soldier (uncredited)
Chris Drake ... Medic Private (uncredited)
Jim Drum ... Supply Sergeant (uncredited)
Gretl Dupont ... French Peasant Woman (uncredited)
John Dutra ... G.I. (uncredited)
Ted Eckelberry ... G.I. (uncredited)

Bill Erwin ... Warrant Officer (uncredited)
Dan Foster ... Gunner (uncredited)
John Gardner ... G.I. (uncredited)
Eugene Gericke ... German Soldier (uncredited)
Edmund Glover ... G.I. from Maine (uncredited)
David Holt ... G.I. Straggler (uncredited)
James Horne ... Transportation Captain (uncredited)
Richard Irving ... G.I. from New York (uncredited)
Samuel Jaegers ... Drill Sergeant (uncredited)
Dickie Jones ... Tanker (uncredited)
Tommy Kelly ... Casualty (uncredited)
Billy Lechner ... Runner (uncredited)
William F. Leicester ... Tank Destroyer Man (uncredited)
Martin Lowell ... G.I. (uncredited)
Ian MacDonald ... Army Colonel (uncredited)
John Mansfield ... Casualty (uncredited)

Dewey Martin ... G.I. Straggler (uncredited)
Jimmy Martin ... G.I. from the South (uncredited)
Roger McGee ... Tanker (uncredited)
Peter Michael ... German Soldier (uncredited)
William Murphy ... Non-Com (uncredited)
John Mylong ... German Major (uncredited)

Tommy Noonan ... G.I. Straggler (uncredited)
George Offerman Jr. ... K Company G.I. (uncredited)

Jerry Paris ... German Sergeant (uncredited)
Victor Paul ... G.I. (uncredited)
Steve Pendleton ... Sergeant (uncredited)
Janine Perreau ... Little Girl (uncredited)
Phillip Pine ... G.I. Non-Com (uncredited)
Albert Pollet ... French Peasant Man (uncredited)
Bob Porter ... G.I. (uncredited)
Otto Reichow ... German Platoon Leader (uncredited)
John R. Reilly ... Tanker Filling Up with Gas (uncredited)
Sammy Resnick ... Non-Com (uncredited)
Jon Riffel ... 'Kipp' Kipton (uncredited)
Henry Rowland ... German NCO (uncredited)
John Royce ... German Soldier (uncredited)
Edmon Ryan ... Major (uncredited)
Carl Saxe ... 101st Battalion Officer (uncredited)
Nelson Scott ... G.I. (uncredited)
Irene Seidner ... French Peasant Woman (uncredited)
William Self ... K Company G.I. (uncredited)
Charles Smith ... Walking Wounded (uncredited)
Ivan Triesault ... German Captain (uncredited)
Max Trujillo ... GI (uncredited)
Roland Varno ... German Lieutenant (uncredited)
Tommy Walker ... Mechanic (uncredited)
Arthur Walsh ... G.I. (uncredited)
Frank Whitbeck ... Trailer Narrator (voice) (uncredited)
Ward Wood ... Replacement (uncredited)
Fred Zendar ... German Soldier (uncredited)
Create a character page for: ?

Directed by
William A. Wellman 
 
Writing credits
Robert Pirosh (story and screenplay)

Produced by
Robert Pirosh .... associate producer
Dore Schary .... producer
 
Original Music by
Lennie Hayton (musical score)
 
Cinematography by
Paul Vogel (director of photography) (as Paul C. Vogel)
 
Film Editing by
John D. Dunning  (as John Dunning)
 
Art Direction by
Cedric Gibbons 
Hans Peters 
 
Set Decoration by
Edwin B. Willis (set decorations)
 
Makeup Department
Jack Dawn .... makeup creator
 
Production Management
William Kaplan .... production manager (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Sid Sidman .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Alfred E. Spencer .... associate set decorator
Matty Azzarone .... construction (uncredited)
Donald P. Desmond .... set construction (uncredited)
Frank Wesselhoff .... painter (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Douglas Shearer .... recording supervisor
Conrad Kahn .... sound (uncredited)
 
Stunts
Gene Coogan .... stunts (uncredited)
Victor Paul .... stunts (uncredited)
Carl Saxe .... stunts (uncredited)
Fred Zendar .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Henry Forrester .... grip (uncredited)
J. Harper .... camera operator (uncredited)
Ed Hubbell .... still photographer (uncredited)
James Manatt .... still photographer (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
Peter Ballbusch .... montage sequences
 
Music Department
Wally Heglin .... orchestrator (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Harry Kinnard .... technical adviser (as H.W.O. Kinnard Lt.Col. Inf.)
John Banse .... script supervisor (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies
  • Battered Bastards of Bastogne, The  this story is about, and dedicated to, those Americans who met General Heinrich von Lüttwitz and his 47 Panzer Corps and won for themselves the honored and immortal name (as "The Battered Bastards of Bastogne")
  • U.S. Army  special thanks
Create a character page for: ?

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
118 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Sound System)
Certification:
Australia:G | Australia:PG (TV rating) | Canada:PG (video rating) | Finland:K-16 | Netherlands:14 (original rating) (1950) | Norway:16 | Sweden:15 | UK:A (original rating) (passed with cuts) | UK:PG (tv rating) | UK:PG (video rating) (1998) | USA:TV-PG | USA:Approved (certificate #13886)
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
James Whitmore took over the role of Sgt. Kinnie after James Mitchell was fired for moving too much like a dancer and not enough like a drill sergeant.See more »
Goofs:
Revealing mistakes: When the soldiers are reading "Strategic Withdrawal in Bulge", the headline below clearly reads, "Hilter Counter Offensive..."See more »
Quotes:
[while being bombarded by German artillery during a driving blizzard]
Holley:We've had good deals before, but this is the best one yet. This is great. I don't ever wanna go back. I found a home in the army.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
Santa Claus is Comin' to TownSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
48 out of 53 people found the following review useful.
Christmas crisis in the Ardennes, December 1944, 22 May 2001
Author: smiley-39 (tonyfrederickcox@googlemail.com) from Liverpool England

This is not a large scale multi-million dollar epic of World War Two. No thousands of extras, no wide panoramic sweep of battle scenes. This says more about The Battle of the Bulge than the movie of the same name. It's just an ordinary black and white M.G.M. production. What it lacks in size and scope it makes up for in impact.A simple story very well told, of a squad of GI's of the 101st Airborne Division, thrown into the maelstrom that was the German offensive in the Ardennes in December of 1944 against the Allied ground forces.

It's hard to believe that this film was not shot on location; but on a Metro sound stage. And Metro's Culver City was turned into the only outdoor location for the snow-covered, rubble-strewn town of Bastogne under siege, which was tenaciously held by the 101st, under the command of Brig. General Anthony McAuliffe.

With the exception of Van Johnson as Pvt. Holly who was high profile on the Metro lot in his time, and George Murphy as Pvt. Stazak, the rest of the cast were character-type actors who filled their roles perfectly. James Whitmore as Sgt. Kinnie is drilling the squad in the opening scenes.

The squad members talk of an enjoyable furlough in Paris which is suddenly cut short by the German breakthrough in the Ardenne. Ptv. Stazak hopes of going home are dashed because his authorised documents have not come through before the squad moves up front. Douglas Fowley as Pvt. Kippton seems to be the best in the squad at bellyaching.Maybe it's his dentures that make him a sourpuss. But Fowley's dentures turn into a class act; clicking away to the old song, "I Surrender Dear," through the courtesy of a German propaganda broadcast heard over the radio in a Sherman tank. Denise Darcel comes as a welcome relief of feminine pleasure; not out of place in the town of Bastogne itself. In an indoor scene, Pvt. Holly's eyeballs go into left-to-right overdrive as he stares at Denise's buxom rear end descending a flight of stairs. Then there's Holly again, nursing stolen newly-laid eggs, as valuable as gold nuggets. He's about to scramble them over a fire when the squad is told to saddle up and move out. Not for the first time does Johnson (Pvt. Holly) yell, "oh no!" A expression he's used in past movies also. The broken eggs in his upturned helmet are now a problem. In the end it's disaster. The German artillery scramble the eggs for Holly. Problem solved!

On a three man patrol, Holly, Hodiak as Janness, Montalban as Rodriguez, intercept and force a jeep carrying a Major and two sergeants to stop and identify themselves. The knowledge that Germans are infiltrating in GI uniforms has made the patrol suspicious so the Major is asked how the Dodgers made out in 1944. The Major hesitates,but the Sergeant in the rear seat asks Holly who Betty Grable is married to. Montalban shouts back, "Cesar Romero". The Major says Romero is out. "Betty Grable is married to Harry James". The tense atmosphere relaxes. The patrol is convinced they're friendly.

What is displayed authentically on this studio sound stage is the icy, bone-chilling atmosphere of the battlefield. The men hunkered down; the deeper the better, in their foxholes. Throughout nearly all this movie there is the constant rise and fall in the background of continuous artillery fire, like a rolling thunder. It never seems to cease. Sometimes it's close, sometimes distant. That, along with the freezing fog hanging like a thick whitish-grey blanket in the air, enveloping everything, gives off an atmosphere of crisis; a feeling of fearful tension. The men endeavour to dispel the fear with humour. Waiting and wondering when the enemy will appear ghost-like out of the mist-shrouded forest.

Near the end of the movie, Leon Ames gives a good performance as a Army Chaplain. Trying to explain the reason for this necessary trip to Europe, to kill off a murderous political system that has already killed off millions. Before the end, the tables turn in the Allies favour. Sergeant Kinnie notices his shadow against the snow. The sun is breaking through and the mist rises. Allied tactical air power is back in business again with a vengeance.

Veteran director William Wellman was not found wanting when he directed this movie. He had already proved himself with, "The Story of GI Joe", in 1945. Antiwar film? Any war film well made and convincing can be antiwar, and you do not need blood all over the silver screen to prove it. Antiwar or not, World War Two was a "popular" war. The reasons stuck out a mile. The Army Chaplain said so in so many words.

The Ardennes offensive caught the Allies unawares, in short, too cocksure. By late 1944, battered the German forces may have been. But they still had a few nasty shots in their locker to scare the living daylights out of the Allied Command. The allies paid the penalty in lost ground and casualties for General Eisenhower's insistence for a broad front advance. We thought the Germans had run out of fighting steam, but old Field Marshal Karl Rudolf Gerd Von Rundstedt thought different!

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (65 total) »

Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for Battleground (1949)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
The Chaplain's Sermon BigIdeasMolitz
Battle Scene Realism bdhuntr
Marijuana fredcdobbsjr
Whitmore Tobacco Chewing doccarbon
Did that soldier who kept clicking his teeth get killed? Hukkk
George Murphy spongebobgrl6776
See more »

Recommendations

If you enjoyed this title, our database also recommends:
- - - - -
Saints and Soldiers Battle of the Bulge The Dirty Dozen The Longest Day Days of Glory
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
Show more recommendations

Related Links

Full cast and crew Company credits External reviews
News articles IMDb Action section IMDb USA section

You may report errors and omissions on this page to the IMDb database managers. They will be examined and if approved will be included in a future update. Clicking the 'Edit page' button will take you through a step-by-step process.