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Late Spring (1949) More at IMDbPro »Banshun (original title)


2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

19 items from 2010


Setsuko Hara

29 October 2010 5:23 PM, PDT | Screen Anarchy | See recent Screen Anarchy news »

Continuing its commitment to contemporary Japanese fare, Viz Cinema has been busy throughout the month of October with the San Francisco premiere of John H. Lee's Sayonara Itsuka: Goodbye, Someday (2010); encore screenings of Junichi Suzuki's documentary 442--Live with Honor, Die with Dignity (2010); the U.S. premiere of Takeshi Koike's anime Redline; while likewise hosting the San Francisco Film Society's Taiwan Film Days.

But Viz Cinema has granted equal time to honor classic Japanese cinema, most recently with four Yasujirō Ozu films profiling the performances of Setsuko Hara--Late Spring (1949), Early Summer (1954), Late Autumn (1960) and Tokyo Twilight (1957)--and currently with four films by Kenji Mizoguchi: Women of the Night (1948), Miss Oyu (1951), Life of Oharu (1952), and Sansho the Bailiff (1952) (running through early November).

»

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Setsuko Hara

29 October 2010 5:23 PM, PDT | Screen Anarchy | See recent Screen Anarchy news »

Continuing its commitment to contemporary Japanese fare, Viz Cinema has been busy throughout the month of October with the San Francisco premiere of John H. Lee's Sayonara Itsuka: Goodbye, Someday (2010); encore screenings of Junichi Suzuki's documentary 442--Live with Honor, Die with Dignity (2010); the U.S. premiere of Takeshi Koike's anime Redline; while likewise hosting the San Francisco Film Society's Taiwan Film Days.

But Viz Cinema has granted equal time to honor classic Japanese cinema, most recently with four Yasujirō Ozu films profiling the performances of Setsuko Hara--Late Spring (1949), Early Summer (1954), Late Autumn (1960) and Tokyo Twilight (1957)--and currently with four films by Kenji Mizoguchi: Women of the Night (1948), Miss Oyu (1951), Life of Oharu (1952), and Sansho the Bailiff (1952) (running through early November).

»

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Start at the top and work your way down

2 October 2010 10:47 AM, PDT | blogs.suntimes.com/ebert | See recent Roger Ebert's Blog news »

• Introduction to The Great Movies III

You'd be surprised how many people have told me they're working their way through my books of Great Movies one film at a time. That's not to say the books are definitive; I loathe "best of" lists, which are not the best of anything except what someone came up with that day. I look at a list of the "100 greatest horror films," or musicals, or whatever, and I want to ask the maker, "but how do you know?" There are great films in my books, and films that are not so great, but there's no film here I didn't respond strongly to. That's the reassurance I can offer.

I believe good movies are a civilizing force. They allow us to empathize with those whose lives are different than our own. I like to say they open windows in our box of space and time. »

- Roger Ebert

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Tuesday Foreign Region/Blu-ray Disc Report: "Tokyo Story" (Yasujiro Ozu, 1952)

13 September 2010 12:36 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

What, finally, is the point of the Blu-ray disc? Not just for cinephiles, but for anyone with a home entertainment setup? Which questions lead us back to the question of what's the point of a home entertainment setup. Not just for anyone, but for cinephiles. You following me?

These questions dog me as I consider three Blu-ray discs from the British Film Institute, high-resolution home versions of three—no, wait, make that four— Ozu masterpieces. If I focus here on Tokyo Story, it's because it's the one best known to whatever larger audience there is or may be for Ozu pictures, and also because it's the one that's most likely to be a budding cinephile or film student's first exposure to Ozu. The other three Ozu pictures put out not merely in Blu-ray but in dual-format—that is, Blu-ray and standard definition DVD—editions are 1951's Early Summer, and a »

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Venice and Tiff 2010. Athina Rachel Tsangari's "Attenberg"

13 September 2010 8:14 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Let's begin this one with Josef Braun's first review in his first dispatch from Toronto: "Like last year's Dogtooth, which [Athina Rachel] Tsangari co-produced, Attenberg is marked by its somewhat perverse engagement in family, belated sexual development, and an extreme case of naïveté that, aggressively quirky as it may be, is mercifully and rigorously stripped of affectation — its lead actress Ariane Labed just won a much-deserved award at Venice. Dogtooth director Giorgios Lanthimos meanwhile shows up here playing a kindly, soft-spoken love interest who connects with Labed by way of their mutual fondness for the 70s electro-punk duo Suicide. Tsangari's approach is at once anthropological, elliptical, and surrealistically comic.... It's the story of a dying widower trying to prepare his adult daughter for, well, basically for he rest of her life. Like Claire Denis's 35 Rhums, this feels like another enormously creative variation on Ozu's Late Spring." »

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Tokyo Story | DVD review

28 August 2010 4:05 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

(1953, U, BFI)

Japanese film-maker Yasujiro Ozu (1903-63) was unknown in the west until this supreme masterpiece was shown in Europe. A film that can be mentioned in the same breath as King Lear, it centres on an elderly couple from a small coastal town leaving their unmarried daughter behind and travelling by train to visit their married doctor son, married beautician daughter and daughter-in-law, a war widow, in Tokyo. Only the daughter-in-law proves welcoming. It's an astutely observed study of married love and parental relationships, of what we hope for in life and what we end up with, that neither sentimentalises nor idealises the old couple. In the Observer in 1963 Ken Tynan called it "momentously subtle, extraordinarily beautiful", and it unfolds in Ozu's customary style of carefully composed shots from a camera placed just above floor level. This double-disc set contains both DVD and Blu-ray versions as well as Brothers and Sisters »

- Philip French

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On September 22nd, 66 Criterion Collection Films Will Expire From Netflix Watch Instantly [Update 8/27]

23 August 2010 9:11 PM, PDT | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

[Update 8/27/10 - I went back to InstantWatcher.com to check on the status of upcoming expiring Criterion films, and it appears that this entire list has disappeared from their listings. I checked on a few of the titles, and it looks like their streaming end dates have been extended! I will be updating this post later, with the correct dates, but it looks like something happened between this post going up, and now.]

Some sad news to report, on the streaming side of things today. I just learned, via the excellent website InstantWatcher.com, that more than a few Criterion Collection films will be expiring from Netflix’s Watch Instantly service on September 22nd.

In total, 66 films from the Criterion Collection will be removed from the line-up, but don’t go canceling your account just yet. Over the past year, on several monthly occasions, a number of Criterion films were added, allowing viewers to stream some of the best titles that Criterion had at their disposal. Netflix has never claimed that everything on Watch Instantly would last forever, and there may be a number of reasons why these titles are going away. Some theories I’m kicking around:

Criterion and Netflix set up a deal, and that deal is coming to an end. Pretty simple. Criterion may be looking at moving more of these titles to Hulu, »

- Ryan Gallagher

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Rudie Lists His Top Ten Favorite Foreign Films

18 August 2010 10:12 PM, PDT | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

I came across Time Out New York’s list of their top 50 foreign films of all time. Although a very good list, I felt, personally, there were some omissions. I decided to come up with my own top list. 50 is a huge number for me to tackle so I also decided to scale it down to 10. Seems to be a good round number. Most of these films are in the Criterion Collection but there are a few on my list that are not, but I do feel that these few should be.

I’m also going to follow Time Out New York’s guideline of no silent film (although I do love silent films) and no films from England, Australia or any other English speaking countries.

Also, my list is going to gravitate to more contemporary films rather than classics. That’s just the way I roll!

My Favorite Foreign »

- Rudie Obias

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BFI To Release Dual Format (DVD & Blu-ray) Ozu Titles, First Up: Early Summer, Late Spring, And Tokyo Story

26 July 2010 4:28 PM, PDT | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

Over the next three years, BFI is set to release one of the most extensive collection of films from one filmmaker this world has known.

According to DVD Outsider, the company will be releasing all 32 films from the legendary Japanese auteur Yasujiro Ozu, with at least seven of them being available on DVD/Blu-ray for the very first time in their history. These will only be available as Region 2 locked discs, so you’ll need a Region-free Blu-ray player to take advantage of these titles.

Many of these films are obviously available through the Criterion Collection and its sister collection, the Eclipse Series, but it looks like after the massively successful retrospective run of Ozu’s films, that BFI has taken the reigns and will be giving any fan of the legendary filmmaker a reason to start saving those pennies, or selling those kidneys.

First up is Tokyo Story, Early »

- Joshua Brunsting

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A Journey Through The Eclipse Series: Yasujiro Ozu’s Early Spring

26 July 2010 12:32 PM, PDT | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

The world today isn’t very interesting.

Everyone’s dissatisfied.

You ought to try and have a good time.

You’re right. That’s the only way.

I guess that’s about it.

After a weekend packed with tweets, blogs and breaking news about hotly anticipated fantasy/action/adventure/sci-fi movies from the San Diego Comic-Con, I’m sure that some of us are ready to spend a few minutes thinking about poignant, calm, reality-based films for grown-ups as a refreshing change of pace. At least I hope so, since that’s where I’m trying to draw your attention. For this week’s column, I’ve chosen Yasujiro Ozu’s Early Spring, from Eclipse Series 3: Late Ozu. It’s Ozu’s follow-up to Tokyo Story, one of those perennial candidates for “greatest film of all time,” at least within some subsets of the art house crowd. I’ve »

- David Blakeslee

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A Journey Through The Eclipse Series: Yasujiro Ozu’s Passing Fancy

19 July 2010 12:00 PM, PDT | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

With better manners, he’d be head of his class.

Over the course of a career spanning the late 1920s to the early 1960s, Japanese auteur Yasujiro Ozu released 54 films. Of those, 17, nearly one-third, are irretrievably lost and a pair exist only in fragments. Of the films that remain, another 17 have now been released in the United States through Janus Films and the Criterion Collection. That number was just attained last week when Criterion issued a lovingly crafted box set of two films: The Only Son and There Was a Father. This news, combined with our recent podcast focused on Floating Weeds and the in-depth Ozu retrospective series by Moises Chiullan in his Arthouse Cowboy column over at Hollywood-Elsewhere.com, have made Ozu a frequent topic of conversation on this site and in the online community of Criterion and cinema fans over the past few weeks. So now seems as »

- David Blakeslee

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This week's new DVD and Blu-ray

16 July 2010 4:05 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The Ozu Collection

DVD & Blu-Ray, BFI

It's only in the past decade or so that the films of director Yasujiro Ozu have really come to our attention in the west; hard to believe now that he's a fixture in any self-respecting "best films ever" list. Now the BFI is making sure such a shameful oversight never happens again. All 32 of his surviving films are to be released, starting with the Noriko Trilogy: Late Spring, Early Summer and Tokyo Story, all linked by themes and characters. His films don't deal with action, rather with reaction – usually to situations and characters that remain offscreen, unseen. Ozu's style contains plenty of long takes and static camerawork, methods that are now just as cliched in the arthouse world as bullet time and 3D are in action films. But in Ozu's hands these tools, then fresh, are powerful. He steadfastly refuses to make a big deal out of anything, »

- Phelim O'Neill

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Criterion New Release Tuesday For July 13th, 2010 – The Only Son And There Was A Father, Two Films By Yasujiro Ozu

13 July 2010 6:00 AM, PDT | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

The Criterion Collection has just added two important links in the chain for Western cinephiles seeking more convenient access to the films of Yasujiro Ozu. A new mini-box set containing two films, from 1936 and 1942 respectively, fills part of the gap between A Story of Floating Weeds (1933) and Late Spring (1948.) Previously unavailable in the USA, The Only Son and There Was a Father are two fine additions to Ozu’s justly celebrated series of family-centered dramas spread over nearly five decades of Japanese history.

A recent episode of the CriterionCast featured a guest appearance by Moises Chiullan, who’s nearing completion of an epic series of essays chronicling the full extent of Ozu’s career and surviving films (many of his early silent features are now lost.) You can hear his insightful comments on the episode where Moises, Rudie, Ryan and Travis discussed Floating Weeds and A Story of Floating Weeds. »

- David Blakeslee

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The heart-wrenching performance of Setsuko Hara, Ozu's quiet muse | Peter Bradshaw

16 June 2010 6:49 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Hara, who turns 90 tomorrow, enigmatically walked away from films in 1963 – but her subtle power in Tokyo Story remains undiminished

This Thursday sees the 90th birthday of one of the greatest stars in cinema history, and yet it will pass off quietly. Such has been her profound reticence that even this very brief blog, noticing the fact, seems impertinent. Setsuko Hara is the actor who was unforgettable in key films by Yasujiro Ozu, as well as work by Mikio Naruse and Akira Kurosawa in a career lasting over 30 years, but foreswore the acting profession in 1963. By this time she had become an icon in Japan, sometimes called the "Eternal Virgin". Her retirement may have been connected with the death of Ozu, with whom she will forever be associated, but since then she has refused to elaborate or give interviews. In an age when actors solemnly tell newspapers and celeb magazines how very very "private" they are, »

- Peter Bradshaw

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Clip joint: Simplicity

26 May 2010 5:31 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

This week on Clip joint, nilpferd is not perfumed, not coloured, just kind, as he talks us through some of the best examples of simplicity in the cinema

Every now and then we need to get back to the basics. Whether overwhelmed by the rapid-edit audiovisual overload of 21st century cinema, or just in need of an escape from the hectic pace of everyday life, we can all use a dose of minimalism from time to time.

The reduction of any art form to an essential core has long been equated with perfection, and the movies are no exception. But inevitably, trying to definite "simplicity" in film is anything but straightforward, encompassing anything from Len Lye's direct films to Derek Jarman's Blue, the low-budget slacker charm of Clerks versus the philosophical musings of Bruce Lee.

And there's always the risk of refining things so much that there's nothing left. »

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Netflix Watch Instantly Adds 8 More Criterion Collection Films This Week [Criterion on Netflix]

3 April 2010 12:13 AM, PDT | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

Well folks, it’s been a while, but Netflix has finally added several more Criterion Collection films to their Watch Instantly streaming options. Back in December we saw a rather large group of films added, with each following month adding fewer and fewer Criterion films. This past week has seen the addition of 8 films (one on April 1st, and 7 on the 3rd), all of which you should add to your Queue.

We recently reported that Jean Luc Godard’s Breathless would be re-released in theaters with a new transfer this month as part of the TCM Classic Film Festival, with a general release at the end of May in New York, and a national roll out afterwards. You can now see the film that made our writer James McCormick’s Top Ten Jean Paul Belmondo Film list, via Watch Instantly. It will be interesting to see if this print of »

- Ryan Gallagher

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As Yasujiro Ozu reaches Late Autumn he's become master of slow cinema

22 January 2010 4:05 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Most film-makers expand their technique as they get older but Yasujiro Ozu stripped his away

Last week we lost Eric Rohmer, the chattiest and least stylistically demonstrative (allegedly) of the French new wavers, and a conversation ensued all week about whether or not watching his films really was, as Gene Hackman's character Harry Moseby said in Night Moves, "kinda like watching paint dry".

We could have much the same conversation about Yasujiro Ozu, I suppose, if we wanted to stay stupid for another whole week, but let's not. Let's leave behind a vocabulary in which words like slow, contemplative, austere and mild are used pejoratively, and welcome the chance to enter Ozu's radiantly calm universe. It's a quiet back room in the House Of Cinema, where life unfolds at a measured pace, parcelled out in simple, static shots of talkative families at mealtimes and other social rituals, where the »

- John Patterson

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Ozu v Avatar – this really is what cinema has come down to

15 January 2010 12:00 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Yasujiro Ozu's sublime family dramas hymned our ordinary bliss and everyday tragedy. Our film culture is now in danger of forgetting such jewels in our endless grasping for the smash-bang shallow spectacles of Avatar and its ilk

Family is where we learn everything, including the sweeping urge to be done with family. Family is a basis of every narrative art, even if it offers us the humbling insight that our lives are all so ordinary and alike as to be worthless or without lofty significance. For most of us, family determines who will be at our funeral, and with what mixed feelings. Family asserts that we are higher than animals, and is the undertone and the consideration that leaves every one of us, if not afraid, then stilled, as we go to bed at night.

You see, this is an unusual essay for a newspaper, for it deals with »

- David Thomson

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An artist of the unhurried world

8 January 2010 4:06 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Of the films made during Japan's cinematic golden age, those of Yasujiro Ozu are seen as most typically Japanese. But as studies in character and domestic life, they are universal, argues Ian Buruma, and they reveal beauty where we don't usually look for it

Akira Kurosawa made great samurai films. Kenji Mizoguchi filmed the lives of courtesans and geishas with the feel of classical Japanese painting. Yasujiro Ozu made films about middle-class families in Tokyo. Of these three masters of Japan's cinematic golden age, which lasted from the 1930s till the 1960s, Ozu is considered to be the most typically Japanese. So much so that Japanese producers refused at first to release his films abroad. Foreigners wouldn't understand. They might laugh at Japanese in business suits sipping green tea on tatami mat floors. They wouldn't get the subtlety of Japanese family relations. Ozu's style would surely strike action-loving westerners as boring and slow. »

- Ian Buruma

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

19 items from 2010


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