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Late Spring (1949)
"Banshun" (original title)

 -  Drama  -  21 July 1972 (USA)
8.1
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Ratings: 8.1/10 from 6,871 users  
Reviews: 51 user | 64 critic

Noriko is twenty-seven years old and still living with her widowed father. Everybody tries to talk her into marrying, but Noriko wants to stay at home caring for her father.

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(based on the novel "Chichi to musume" by), (screenplay), 1 more credit »
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Title: Late Spring (1949)

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Shukichi Somiya
...
Noriko Somiya
Yumeji Tsukioka ...
Aya Kitagawa
Haruko Sugimura ...
Masa Taguchi
Hohi Aoki ...
Katsuyoshi
Jun Usami ...
Shôichi Hattori
Kuniko Miyake ...
Akiko Miwa
Masao Mishima ...
Jo Onodera
Yoshiko Tsubouchi ...
Kiku
Yôko Katsuragi ...
Misako
Toyo Takahashi ...
Shige (as Toyoko Takahashi)
Jun Tanizaki ...
Seizô Hayashi
Ichirô Shimizu ...
Takigawa's master
Yôko Benisawa ...
Teahouse Proprietress
Manzaburo Umewaka ...
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Storyline

Noriko is 27 years old and is still living with her father Somiya, a widower. Noriko just recovered from an illness she developed in the war, and now the important question pops up: when will Noriko start thinking about marriage? Everybody who is important in her life tries to talk her into it: her father, her aunt, a girlfriend. But Noriko doesn't want to get married, she seems extremely happy with her life. She wants to stay with her father to take care of him. After all, she knows best of his manners and peculiarities. But Noriko's aunt doesn't want to give up. She arranges a partner for her and thinks of a plan that will convince Noriko her father can be left alone. Written by Arnoud Tiele (imdb@tiele.nl)

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

21 July 1972 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Late Spring  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Most of the movie takes place in Kita-Kamakura, about 30 miles from downtown Tokyo. Several years after the release of the film, the director, 'Yasujiro Ozu', moved with his mother to the area and spent the rest of his life there. (His tomb is also located there.) Furthermore, the film's star, Setsuko Hara, also eventually moved to the area and, as of May 2013, reportedly still lives there under her birth name, Masae Aida. See more »

Goofs

A camera/dolly shadow is visible on the sidewalk as it follows Noriko walking. See more »

Connections

Featured in Good Men, Good Women (1995) See more »

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User Reviews

 
The inevitable sadness of life
1 June 2005 | by (Finland) – See all my reviews

The first time I read about Ozu, I immediately became obsessed to see his films. Based on what I heard, I knew I would love them. The first one I saw was Tokyo Story, pet of film historians, which disappointed me (although I've later learned to love it like any other Ozu). After that came End of Summer and Late Spring, which both floored me with both emotion *and* intellectual delight. Even after seeing it I can't stop thinking about Late Spring, and now I'm ready to herald it as one of the greatest films I've ever seen.

Late Spring perfectly encapsulates Ozu's one and only theme: the inevitable sadness of life caused by change. It's a theme that never goes away. However, hardly no one else than the Japanese were able to tell you about change in the 1940's. Mind you, Ozu made his greatest films during a period when Japan became under the Western influence: Coca Cola and baseball became commonplace, industrialism and capitalism accelerated rapidly, and the concept of a traditional Japanese family and society became to fall apart. Considering the value of traditional Japanese culture, this change shouldn't be underestimated. Unlike Wim Wenders in his Ozu documentary Tokyo-ga, Ozu's point of view in this matter isn't preachy, however. What makes his films so fantastic in the end game is his sophisticated yet simple-minded philosophy of life: change and sadness are both essential and inevitable in life, and we have to accept it.

Not that Late Spring isn't amazing when forgetting its context. Ozu's relentlessly formalist visual style his apparent here, and both Chishu Ryu and Setsuko Hara deliver what are staggering performances. The film is brilliantly lyrical, especially the ending, which I consider one of the saddest and most touching movie endings aside Robert Bresson's Au hasard Balthasar: the father (Chishu Ryu) returns to home from his daughter's wedding, sits down to peel an apple, but soon understands his loneliness, and how inevitable it is. From here Ozu cuts to a simple shot of waves hitting shore, without trying to underline or prove anything. The End. This is what movies are all about.


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