13 user 4 critic

Always Leave Them Laughing (1949)

Passed | | Comedy, Drama | 26 November 1949 (USA)
A young comic plays second-rate nightclubs and chintzy resorts in his struggle to break into the big time.



(screenplay), (screenplay) | 4 more credits »


Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Pushover (1954)
Crime | Drama | Film-Noir
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

A larcenous undercover cop falls for the beautiful moll of a bank robber on the run and together they double-cross the hood and the cops.

Director: Richard Quine
Stars: Fred MacMurray, Kim Novak, Philip Carey
Crime | Film-Noir | Mystery
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.6/10 X  

The lady editor of a crime magazine hires Philip Marlowe to find the wife of her boss. The private detective soon finds himself involved in murder.

Director: Robert Montgomery
Stars: Robert Montgomery, Audrey Totter, Lloyd Nolan
Adventure | Comedy | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.9/10 X  

Comedy subtly dealing with moral issues such as racial bigotry, corporate greed, American belief of societal superiority and hypocrisy.

Director: John Ford
Stars: John Wayne, Lee Marvin, Elizabeth Allen
Comedy | Drama | Western
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.4/10 X  

A Polish rabbi wanders through the Old West on his way to lead a synagogue in San Francisco. On the way he is nearly burnt at the stake by Indians and almost killed by outlaws.

Director: Robert Aldrich
Stars: Gene Wilder, Harrison Ford, Ramon Bieri
Comedy | Musical
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

A wily slave must unite a virgin courtesan and his young smitten master to earn his freedom.

Director: Richard Lester
Stars: Zero Mostel, Phil Silvers, Buster Keaton
Certificate: Passed Comedy | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.8/10 X  

Affluent Millicent and Oliver Jordan throw a dinner for a handful of wealthy and/or well-born acquaintances, each of whom has much to reveal.

Director: George Cukor
Stars: Marie Dressler, John Barrymore, Wallace Beery
The Bank Dick (1940)
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  

Henpecked Egbert Sousè has comic adventures as a substitute film director and unlikely bank guard.

Director: Edward F. Cline
Stars: W.C. Fields, Cora Witherspoon, Una Merkel
Comedy | Romance | Fantasy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.9/10 X  

A modern-day witch likes her neighbor but despises his fiancée, so she enchants him to love her instead, only to fall in love with him for real.

Director: Richard Quine
Stars: James Stewart, Kim Novak, Jack Lemmon
Comedy | Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.6/10 X  

A tycoon hires a tutor to teach his lover proper etiquette.

Director: George Cukor
Stars: Judy Holliday, William Holden, Broderick Crawford
Drama | Mystery | Music
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.9/10 X  

A television newswoman picks up the story of a 1960s rock band whose long-lost leader - Eddie Wilson - may still be alive, while searching for the missing tapes of the band's never-released album.

Director: Martin Davidson
Stars: Tom Berenger, Michael Paré, Joe Pantoliano
Film-Noir | Romance | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.5/10 X  

In 1903, a doctor suspects murder in the gothic Bederaux family.

Director: Jacques Tourneur
Stars: Hedy Lamarr, George Brent, Paul Lukas
Crime | Film-Noir | Mystery
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8/10 X  

A small-time grifter and nightclub tout takes advantage of some fortuitous circumstances and tries to become a big-time player as a wrestling promoter.

Director: Jules Dassin
Stars: Richard Widmark, Gene Tierney, Googie Withers


Complete credited cast:
Sam Washburn
Elliott Montgomery
Ransom M. Sherman ...
Henry 'Hank' Richards (as Ransom Sherman)
Wally Vernon - Comic
Cecil Stewart & His Royal Rogues ...
Specialty Act Group
O'Donnell & Blair ...
Specialty Act
The Moroccans ...
Specialty Act


Kip Cooper, a successful comedy star, is the hit of the nation starring on his own television show. His agent, in flashback, tells a young, inexperienced comedian how Cooper rose to the top, mostly running over others on the way. Copper was a small-time comedian who worked upwards through sheer aggressiveness. He double-crosses his sweetheart after she gets him a big break, lies, cheats and steals material in his efforts to succeed. But, he sees the light. Written by Les Adams <longhorn1939@suddenlink.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


We're Berle-ing them Over!


Comedy | Drama


Passed | See all certifications »




Release Date:

26 November 1949 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Naurukoulu  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Show more on  »

Technical Specs


Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »

Did You Know?


The "Fountain Pen Sketch" was taken from the hit musical (over 400 performances) that opened in New York in 1948, and starred Sid Caesar. Max Showalter, who performs that specialty number in this movie, was also in that opening night cast playing the same role, as well as others. See more »


When Kip Cooper (Milton Berle) asks his agent Wilson (Lloyd Gough) to call Eddie Eagen (Bert Lahr) about replacing him in the show, Wilson picks up the phone and starts talking without dialing. See more »


Eddie Eagen: You're on your way up, Kip. They're probably shining a star for you right now. I just want to remind you there's a great tradition behind you.
Kipling 'Kip' Cooper: Why sure. That's how I started in the first place when I was a kid. Watching the great comics work.
See more »


Referenced in Texaco Star Theatre: Episode #2.11 (1949) See more »


Sobre las olas (Over the Waves)
(1887) (uncredited)
Music by Juventino Rosas
Played in "The Wonder of It All" show during the "Fountain Pen Sketch"
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

Bad Script Ruins This Revisit of Vaudeville
10 March 2014 | by See all my reviews

The reviews for this film seem to be split between those who don't think much of it and those who adore it. I can understand the enjoyment in reliving some old comedy bits, but that is not enough--for me--to make this film a success.

Unfortunately, the writing is terrible. In parts, the script is so melodramatic that it pulls you right out of the scene. And even worse, the writers often have Milton Berle performing for the film's audience when he should be performing for the theater audience in the film. I guess they just couldn't help themselves. But it takes the viewer out of the story, more than once. If they had done that consistently throughout the film, then we might be able to forgive them and consider it a stylistic choice. But when Bert Lahr is on screen, he stays in character the entire time and does not play to the viewer. His performance is the best part of this film and the main reason I give it three stars.

I wanted to give it two stars just for the luminous beauty of Virginia Mayo (Zsa Zsa like in her perfection) and Ruth Roman, but Ms. Mayo's "serious scenes" are excellent examples in how to chew scenery; she can blame part of it on the dialogue they gave her. Ms. Roman, on the other hand, has the chops to shine right through words.

It IS fun to hear some of the tried and true (repackaged and reused) bits from Vaudeville and lesser locales. But that is about all this film has to offer.

The life of a comic is, no doubt, full of unpredictability, self-doubt and wearisome travel. It's too bad the script of Always Leave Them Laughing couldn't stop laughing long enough to be taken seriously.

For a better example of the comic as serious actor, see Jerry Lewis in The King of Comedy.

2 of 4 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 13 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page