"The Lone Ranger"
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4 items from 2016


Brazil (1944)

9 December 2016 8:27 PM, PST | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Good neighbor policy? Wartime exigencies inspired an intra-hemisphere cultural exchange, with the movies seizing on the new popularity of Latin music. Republic’s contribution gives us the great songs of Ady Barroso and a full soundtrack of his compositions — in a featherweight musical romance, of course.

Brazil

Blu-ray

Olive Films

1944 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 91 min. / Street Date December 6, 2016 / available through the Olive Films website / 29.98

Starring Tito Guízar, Virginia Bruce, Edward Everett Horton, Robert Livingston, Veloz and Yolanda, Fortunio Bonanova, Richard Lane, Frank Puglia, Aurora Miranda, Billy Daniel, Dan Seymour, Roy Rogers.

Cinematography Jack A. Marta

Film Editor Fred Allen

Songs Ary Barroso, Hoagy Carmichael

Written by Frank Gill Jr., Laura Kerr, Richard English

Produced by Robert North

Directed by Joseph Santley

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

The wartime ‘Good Neighbor Policy’ was a P.R. blitz intended to steer South America toward the U.S. and away from the Axis. »

- Glenn Erickson

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Mike Gold: Polishing Icons

23 November 2016 5:00 AM, PST | Comicmix.com | See recent Comicmix news »

There was a time when it was generally perceived that iconic heroic fantasy characters such as The Lone Ranger, The Green Hornet, The Shadow and Buck Rogers were so popular for so long that they would be around forever. I think of that whenever somebody alleges Superman and Spider-Man will be around forever. Times change, as do our cultural predilections and venues.

Nonetheless, those heroes have become part of our cultural fabric. Most Americans (at least) who have neither read, seen, nor heard the adventures of these characters have heard their names and have some vague idea of their modus operandi. Just as DC Entertainment has kept Batman, Superman and Wonder Woman “alive” through their comic books while merchandisers and movie producers such as Michael Uslan could enhance their visibility through their more profitable endeavors.

Right now all of the retired heroic fantasy characters I mentioned above are being kept »

- Mike Gold

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Hudson Hawk at 25

28 May 2016 11:16 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

If there is a reliable truism that can coexist alongside the American film industry’s dance of death with economically insane budgets that now routinely soar north of $200 million, it is that (most) critics and potential ticket-buyers can be counted on to review bad buzz and publicized woes of dollars and production instead of the actual movie once it finally finds its way to a screen. And it may in fact be true that the drama behind the scenes often outstrips the quality of the wide-screen finished product, though certainly this is not always the case. The reception of big-budget box-office flops like John Carter, The Lone Ranger, Jupiter Ascending and Oliver Stone’s Alexander are but some late examples of our number-crunching obsession with pop culture minutiae and the fascination of a behemoth’s preordained fall. Most who trudged out to see any of these films during their theatrical »

- Dennis Cozzalio

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Robert Horton, ‘Wagon Train’ Actor, Dies at 91

15 March 2016 12:43 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Robert Horton, known for his role as scout Flint McCullough in the Emmy-nominated series “Wagon Train,” died March 9 in Los Angeles, his niece Joan Evans told the New York Times. He was 91.

He landed his breakout role starring as McCullough in the hit Western series “Wagon Train” for five seasons, exiting the show in 1962. Around the time he left “Wagon Train”– which accumulated seven Primetime Emmy nominations throughout the duration of its eight-season run — the show switched networks, transitioning from NBC to ABC.

Soon after departing from “Wagon Train,” Horton starred in the one-season Western series “A Man Called Shenandoah,” for which he also sang the theme song. Other key TV roles include guest spots on “Murder, She Wrote,” “As the World Turns,” “Alfred Hitchcock Presents,” “Public Defender” and “The Lone Ranger.”

Horton also performed on Broadway and pursued a singing career. In 1963 he starred as rainmaker Bill Starbuck in »

- Alyssa Sage

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2004

4 items from 2016


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