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"The Lone Ranger"
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"The Lone Ranger" (1949) More at IMDbPro »TV series 1949-1957

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The Lone Ranger: Season 5: Episode 39 -- Actors Laina and Dewitt Faversham are behind many robberies throughout the West, but when they arrive in Cedar Springs they might have met their match.

Overview

User Rating:
8.0/10   1,104 votes »
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Contact:
View company contact information for The Lone Ranger on IMDbPro.
Seasons:
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
Release Date:
15 September 1949 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
The adventures of the masked hero and his Native American partner. Full summary »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Nominated for 2 Primetime Emmys. Another 1 nomination See more »
NewsDesk:
(584 articles)
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User Reviews:
One of the best early television series, a true classic See more (12 total) »

Cast

 (Series Cast Summary - 2 of 299)

Jay Silverheels ... Tonto (217 episodes, 1949-1957)

Clayton Moore ... The Lone Ranger / ... (169 episodes, 1949-1957)
(more)

Series Directed by
Hollingsworth Morse (50 episodes, 1950-1953)
George B. Seitz Jr. (32 episodes, 1949-1951)
Oscar Rudolph (32 episodes, 1954-1957)
Earl Bellamy (29 episodes, 1956-1957)
Wilhelm Thiele (26 episodes, 1954-1955)
Paul Landres (23 episodes, 1952-1953)
George Archainbaud (14 episodes, 1949-1950)
Charles D. Livingstone (4 episodes, 1955)
 
Series Writing credits
Fran Striker (81 episodes, 1949-1956)
Tom Seller (37 episodes, 1949-1957)
Joe Richardson (28 episodes, 1950-1955)
George W. Trendle (22 episodes, 1949-1957)
Charles Larson (21 episodes, 1952-1957)
Dan Beattie (20 episodes, 1950-1955)
Harry Poppe Jr. (15 episodes, 1949-1955)
Ralph Goll (15 episodes, 1950-1955)
Curtis Kenyon (15 episodes, 1950-1955)
Eric Freiwald (13 episodes, 1954-1957)
Robert Schaefer (13 episodes, 1954-1957)
David P. Sheppard (10 episodes, 1950-1953)
Herb Meadow (10 episodes, 1950-1951)
Betty Joyce (8 episodes, 1950-1955)
George B. Seitz Jr. (6 episodes, 1949-1953)
Felix Holt (6 episodes, 1950-1955)
Tom Dougall (6 episodes, 1951-1955)
William Bruckner (6 episodes, 1953-1955)
Jack Laird (6 episodes, 1954-1955)
Robert Leslie Bellem (6 episodes, 1956-1957)
Doane R. Hoag (6 episodes, 1956-1957)
Gibson Fox (5 episodes, 1949-1950)
Eve Greene (4 episodes, 1950)
Edmond Kelso (3 episodes, 1949-1957)
Polly James (3 episodes, 1949-1950)
Doris Schroeder (3 episodes, 1949-1950)
Ande Lamb (3 episodes, 1949)
Joseph F. Poland (3 episodes, 1950)
Steve McCarthy (3 episodes, 1953-1955)
Bert Lambert (3 episodes, 1954-1955)
Wells Root (3 episodes, 1956-1957)
Terence Maples (2 episodes, 1953)
Samuel Rice (2 episodes, 1955)
George Van Marter (2 episodes, 1955)
Hilary Creston Rhodes (2 episodes, 1956-1957)
Herbert Purdom (2 episodes, 1957)

Dwight V. Babcock (unknown episodes)
Hal G. Evarts (unknown episodes)
Shirley Ulmer (unknown episodes)

Series Produced by
Jack Chertok .... producer (182 episodes, 1949-1955)
Harry Poppe .... associate producer (182 episodes, 1949-1955)
Sherman A. Harris .... producer (39 episodes, 1956-1957)
George W. Trendle .... producer / executive producer (16 episodes, 1949-1954)
Jack Wrather .... executive producer (2 episodes, 1954-1957)

Paul Landers .... producer (unknown episodes)
 
Series Cinematography by
Robert Pittack (104 episodes, 1952-1955)
Mack Stengler (78 episodes, 1949-1951)
William P. Whitley (39 episodes, 1956-1957)
 
Series Film Editing by
Everett Dodd (59 episodes, 1949-1957)
Frank Capacchione (57 episodes, 1949-1957)
Ben Marmon (17 episodes, 1949-1955)
Marsh Hendry (16 episodes, 1950-1955)
Ernie Leadlay (8 episodes, 1953)
Harvey Manger (6 episodes, 1953)
Axel Hubert Sr. (5 episodes, 1949-1953)
Richard G. Wray (5 episodes, 1949-1952)
Stanley Rabjohn (5 episodes, 1954-1955)
Hal Gordon (2 episodes, 1956)

John Faure (unknown episodes)
Stanley Frazen (unknown episodes)
 
Series Art Direction by
Howard Campbell (52 episodes, 1954-1955)
 
Series Set Decoration by
William Stevens (19 episodes, 1954-1955)
Harry Reif (10 episodes, 1957)
 
Series Costume Design by
John Sacha (unknown episodes)
 
Series Makeup Department
Gene Hibbs .... makeup artist (52 episodes, 1954-1955)
Ben Lane .... makeup artist (39 episodes, 1956-1957)
 
Series Production Management
Hugh McCollum .... production manager (39 episodes, 1956-1957)
 
Series Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Lester D. Guthrie .... assistant director (67 episodes, 1949-1951)
Herbert S. Greene .... assistant director (41 episodes, 1952-1955)
Gene Anderson Jr. .... assistant director (18 episodes, 1956-1957)
George Loper .... assistant director (12 episodes, 1957)
Mark Sandrich Jr. .... assistant director (9 episodes, 1956-1957)
Hal Herman .... assistant director (5 episodes, 1950)
Francis X. Baur Jr. .... assistant director (3 episodes, 1949)

Richard Bremerkamp .... assistant director (unknown episodes)
Leonard J. Shapiro .... assistant director (unknown episodes)
 
Series Sound Department
Richard Van Hessen .... sound (60 episodes, 1949-1951)
Earl Snyder .... sound (52 episodes, 1952-1953)
Robert B. Lee .... sound recordist (52 episodes, 1954-1955)
Philip Mitchell .... sound (29 episodes, 1949-1957)
William Brady .... sound (15 episodes, 1956-1957)

Byron Chudnow .... sound editor (unknown episodes)
Marsh Hendry .... sound (unknown episodes)
Francis J. Scheid .... sound (unknown episodes)
 
Series Stunts
Whitey Hughes .... stunts (2 episodes, 1949-1953)

Troy Melton .... stunts (unknown episodes)
 
Series Camera and Electrical Department
Barlow Simpson .... lighting technician (91 episodes, 1954-1957)
Edward Petzoldt .... chief electrician (52 episodes, 1954-1955)
William A. Fraker .... assistant camera (39 episodes, 1956-1957)
Maynard Rugg .... camera operator (22 episodes, 1956-1957)
 
Series Costume and Wardrobe Department
Richard Bachler .... wardrobe (21 episodes, 1956-1957)
John Zacha .... wardrobe (16 episodes, 1956-1957)
 
Series Editorial Department
Jack Ruggiero .... supervising editor / editorial supervisor (182 episodes, 1949-1955)
Everett Dodd .... supervising editor (4 episodes, 1957)
 
Series Music Department
Elias Friede .... music supervisor (8 episodes, 1956-1957)
 
Series Other crew
Freddie Fralick .... tv coordinator (52 episodes, 1952-1953)
C.D. Livingstone .... tv coordinator (51 episodes, 1954-1955)
Bertram Millhauser .... story editor (39 episodes, 1956-1957)

Shirley Ulmer .... script supervisor (unknown episodes)
 

Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
30 min (221 episodes)
Country:
Language:
Color:
Black and White (1949-1956) | Color (1956-1957)
Aspect Ratio:
1.33 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Recording)
Certification:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The Lone Ranger was inspired by a US marshal named Bass Reeves, who worked in the Oklahoma Territory. Because the territory was largely Indian reservations--and therefore sovereign territory--marshals had to be accompanied by a Native American, hence the character of Tonto. Despite a sterling reputation for maintaining law and order, even when it meant arresting his own son, Reeves was eventually driven from office when Jim Crow laws were passed. Unlike the portrayal he is given on the show, the real Bass Reeves was black.See more »
Goofs:
Factual errors: Silver is described as "a fiery horse with the speed of light". According to Special Relativity, an object with mass cannot achieve the speed of light, as this would require an infinite amount of energy.See more »
Quotes:
[repeated line]
Tonto:Um, that right, Kemosabe.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
Finale from 'William Tell Overture'See more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
One of the best early television series, a true classic, 20 July 2015

This is a classic television western series. There will be mild spoilers of the basic background for the series ahead:

I suspect that most people reading this will have at least some knowledge of this series, but I'll give a brief synopsis of it anyway. A group of six Texas Rangers go riding after an outlaw gang (the Cavendish Gang). The Rangers are being led into a trap by a scout who is working for the gang and five of them are killed in an ambush. The sixth, a man named Reid, survives, in no small part due to the help of an Indian named Tonto who, in a twist of an improbable nature, met him once before, when Tonto was a boy. Reid helped him then and he returns the favor, calling Reid "Kemo Sabe".

Reid recovers and decides to take up a secret identity to track down and bring to justice bad guys. He dons a black mask and a white hat, calling himself "The Lone Ranger". He saves and then tames a wild white stallion he calls Silver. Having a secret silver mine, he covers his expenses and manufactures silver bullets from the ore taken from the mine. Thus is a hero born.

Clayton Moore played the title character most of the series, though John Hart assumed the role for 52 episodes after the first 78 were produced. When Hart wasn't accepted as the character by audiences, Moore returned. Jay Silverheels played Tonto for the entire run, appearing in virtually every episode. Lots of recognizable faces appeared in the series, most of them before they became famous, like DeForrest Kelly, pre-Star Trek and Victor Sen Yung, pre-Bonanza.

This series is available on DVD, most notably the Classic Media The Lone Ranger: Collector's Edition, a 30 disc release containing all 221 episodes. The set is excellent and well worth having if you're a fan. Recommended.

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Was TVs Lone Ranger an fool too?? justKryptonite
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Name of the train in Twisted track ? den-50341
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Why'd they do that? fatfighter67
The Lone Ranger "The Lost Episodes" shamrok1947-1
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