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"The Lone Ranger"
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"The Lone Ranger" (1949) More at IMDbPro »TV series 1949-1957

Photos (See all 244 | slideshow) Videos (see all 443)
The Lone Ranger -- The West becomes wild when a greedy rancher stirs up trouble with a local Native American tribe.  As the threat of war grows, it’s up to the Masked Man and his faithful companion, Tonto, to keep the peace.
The Lone Ranger: Season 5: Episode 39 -- Actors Laina and Dewitt Faversham are behind many robberies throughout the West, but when they arrive in Cedar Springs they might have met their match.
The Lone Ranger: Season 5: Episode 38 -- The Grody Brothers rob the express office in Flat Rock and are in cahoots with an unlikely ally.
The Lone Ranger: Season 5: Episode 37 -- The Calico Kid and his partners rob the Cattlemen’s Association Office in Denton. The Lone Ranger steps in to take down The Calico Kid.
The Lone Ranger: Season 5: Episode 36 -- When Tonto witnesses the shooting of the bank president by his own son, Tonto’s life is put into danger.

Overview

User Rating:
8.0/10   891 votes »
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Contact:
View company contact information for The Lone Ranger on IMDbPro.
Seasons:
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
Release Date:
15 September 1949 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
The adventures of the masked hero and his Native American partner. Full summary »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Nominated for 2 Primetime Emmys. Another 1 nomination See more »
NewsDesk:
(622 articles)
User Reviews:
From Radio To The Small Screen, Movie Serials, Feature Films, Newspaper Strips, Comic Books into being an Indestructible Icon of Our Very Being as a People, Americans! See more (10 total) »

Cast

 (Series Cast Summary - 2 of 298)

Jay Silverheels ... Tonto / ... (217 episodes, 1949-1957)

Clayton Moore ... The Lone Ranger / ... (169 episodes, 1949-1957)
(more)

Series Directed by
Hollingsworth Morse (50 episodes, 1950-1953)
George B. Seitz Jr. (32 episodes, 1949-1951)
Oscar Rudolph (32 episodes, 1954-1957)
Earl Bellamy (29 episodes, 1956-1957)
Wilhelm Thiele (26 episodes, 1954-1955)
Paul Landres (23 episodes, 1952-1953)
George Archainbaud (14 episodes, 1949-1950)
Charles D. Livingstone (4 episodes, 1955)
 
Series Writing credits
Fran Striker (81 episodes, 1949-1956)
Tom Seller (37 episodes, 1949-1957)
Joe Richardson (28 episodes, 1950-1955)
George W. Trendle (22 episodes, 1949-1957)
Charles Larson (21 episodes, 1952-1957)
Dan Beattie (20 episodes, 1950-1955)
Harry Poppe Jr. (15 episodes, 1949-1955)
Ralph Goll (15 episodes, 1950-1955)
Curtis Kenyon (15 episodes, 1950-1955)
Eric Freiwald (13 episodes, 1954-1957)
Robert Schaefer (13 episodes, 1954-1957)
David P. Sheppard (10 episodes, 1950-1953)
Herb Meadow (10 episodes, 1950-1951)
Betty Joyce (8 episodes, 1950-1955)
George B. Seitz Jr. (6 episodes, 1949-1953)
Felix Holt (6 episodes, 1950-1955)
Tom Dougall (6 episodes, 1951-1955)
William Bruckner (6 episodes, 1953-1955)
Jack Laird (6 episodes, 1954-1955)
Robert Leslie Bellem (6 episodes, 1956-1957)
Doane R. Hoag (6 episodes, 1956-1957)
Gibson Fox (5 episodes, 1949-1950)
Eve Greene (4 episodes, 1950)
Edmond Kelso (3 episodes, 1949-1957)
Polly James (3 episodes, 1949-1950)
Doris Schroeder (3 episodes, 1949-1950)
Ande Lamb (3 episodes, 1949)
Joseph F. Poland (3 episodes, 1950)
Steve McCarthy (3 episodes, 1953-1955)
Bert Lambert (3 episodes, 1954-1955)
Wells Root (3 episodes, 1956-1957)
Terence Maples (2 episodes, 1953)
Samuel Rice (2 episodes, 1955)
George Van Marter (2 episodes, 1955)
Hilary Creston Rhodes (2 episodes, 1956-1957)
Herbert Purdom (2 episodes, 1957)

Dwight V. Babcock (unknown episodes)
Hal G. Evarts (unknown episodes)
Shirley Ulmer (unknown episodes)

Series Produced by
Jack Chertok .... producer (182 episodes, 1949-1955)
Harry Poppe .... associate producer (182 episodes, 1949-1955)
Sherman A. Harris .... producer (39 episodes, 1956-1957)
George W. Trendle .... producer / executive producer (16 episodes, 1949-1954)
Jack Wrather .... executive producer (2 episodes, 1954-1957)

Paul Landers .... producer (unknown episodes)
 
Series Cinematography by
Robert Pittack (104 episodes, 1952-1955)
Mack Stengler (78 episodes, 1949-1951)
William P. Whitley (39 episodes, 1956-1957)
 
Series Film Editing by
Everett Dodd (59 episodes, 1949-1957)
Frank Capacchione (57 episodes, 1949-1957)
Ben Marmon (17 episodes, 1949-1955)
Marsh Hendry (16 episodes, 1950-1955)
Ernie Leadlay (8 episodes, 1953)
Harvey Manger (6 episodes, 1953)
Axel Hubert Sr. (5 episodes, 1949-1953)
Richard G. Wray (5 episodes, 1949-1952)
Stanley Rabjohn (5 episodes, 1954-1955)
Hal Gordon (2 episodes, 1956)

John Faure (unknown episodes)
Stanley Frazen (unknown episodes)
 
Series Art Direction by
Howard Campbell (52 episodes, 1954-1955)
 
Series Set Decoration by
William Stevens (19 episodes, 1954-1955)
Harry Reif (10 episodes, 1957)
 
Series Costume Design by
John Sacha (unknown episodes)
 
Series Makeup Department
Gene Hibbs .... makeup artist (52 episodes, 1954-1955)
Ben Lane .... makeup artist (39 episodes, 1956-1957)
 
Series Production Management
Hugh McCollum .... production manager (39 episodes, 1956-1957)
 
Series Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Lester D. Guthrie .... assistant director (67 episodes, 1949-1951)
Herbert S. Greene .... assistant director (41 episodes, 1952-1955)
Gene Anderson Jr. .... assistant director (18 episodes, 1956-1957)
George Loper .... assistant director (12 episodes, 1957)
Mark Sandrich Jr. .... assistant director (9 episodes, 1956-1957)
Hal Herman .... assistant director (5 episodes, 1950)
Francis X. Baur Jr. .... assistant director (3 episodes, 1949)

Richard Bremerkamp .... assistant director (unknown episodes)
Leonard J. Shapiro .... assistant director (unknown episodes)
 
Series Sound Department
Richard Van Hessen .... sound (60 episodes, 1949-1951)
Earl Snyder .... sound (52 episodes, 1952-1953)
Robert B. Lee .... sound recordist (52 episodes, 1954-1955)
Philip Mitchell .... sound (29 episodes, 1949-1957)
William Brady .... sound (15 episodes, 1956-1957)

Byron Chudnow .... sound editor (unknown episodes)
Marsh Hendry .... sound (unknown episodes)
Francis J. Scheid .... sound (unknown episodes)
 
Series Stunts
David Sharpe .... stunt double: Clayton Moore (1 episode, 1954)

Troy Melton .... stunts (unknown episodes)
 
Series Camera and Electrical Department
Barlow Simpson .... lighting technician (91 episodes, 1954-1957)
Edward Petzoldt .... chief electrician (52 episodes, 1954-1955)
Maynard Rugg .... camera operator (22 episodes, 1956-1957)
 
Series Costume and Wardrobe Department
Richard Bachler .... wardrobe (21 episodes, 1956-1957)
John Zacha .... wardrobe (16 episodes, 1956-1957)
 
Series Editorial Department
Jack Ruggiero .... supervising editor / editorial supervisor (182 episodes, 1949-1955)
Everett Dodd .... supervising editor (4 episodes, 1957)
 
Series Music Department
Elias Friede .... music supervisor (8 episodes, 1956-1957)
 
Series Other crew
Freddie Fralick .... tv coordinator (52 episodes, 1952-1953)
C.D. Livingstone .... tv coordinator (51 episodes, 1954-1955)
Bertram Millhauser .... story editor (39 episodes, 1956-1957)

Shirley Ulmer .... script supervisor (unknown episodes)
 

Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
30 min (221 episodes)
Country:
Language:
Color:
Black and White (1949-1956) | Color (1956-1957)
Aspect Ratio:
1.33 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Recording)
Certification:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Clayton Moore sat out 52 episodes. The studio claimed it was a pay dispute, but Moore insisted up until his death that it was over creative differences. John Hart was hired to replace him, but the change did not sit well with audiences. When George W. Trendle sold the rights for the series to Jack Wrather in 1954, Wrather immediately rehired Moore.See more »
Quotes:
[repeated line]
Tonto:Um, that right, Kemosabe.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
Finale from 'William Tell Overture'See more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
19 out of 21 people found the following review useful.
From Radio To The Small Screen, Movie Serials, Feature Films, Newspaper Strips, Comic Books into being an Indestructible Icon of Our Very Being as a People, Americans!, 1 November 2007
Author: John T. Ryan (redryan64@hotmail.com) from United States

Someone once defined what is the definition of AN INTELLECTUAL as being: "A person who can listen to "The William Tell Overture" without thinking of the LONE RANGER!" In this, we heartily concur! It surely would be a tall order to accomplish this, and one that Leopold Stokowski, Arturo Toscanini or .Leonard Bernstein would all find nigh well impossible to do.

And in this there is no disgrace. The Radio Series and the Television Series, along with some Movie Serials, Feature Films, Syndicated Newspaper Comic Strip and Comic Books, all did their part to make "the Masked Man of the Plains and his Faithful Indian companion, Tonto" a deeply seeded element of our collective psyche and of our literary folklore.

As with most legends, it all started gradually, first with a series of Radio Plays, written for local use in Detroit over Radio Station WXYZ. The Creator was one George W. Trendle and the Principal Writer on the Series was Mr. Trendle's brother-in-law, Mr. Fran Striker. The year was 1933 when the Ranger first rode out to "…the Plains of the Early Western United States!" The Lone Ranger, Tonto and the Radio Series all successfully guided Depression Era Americans through the mid and late '30's up to and through World War II. But the Post-War Era found the country in the midst of a Super-Nova Explosion of invention and technology. There had been a new communications medium standing ready in the wings, but unable to go forth until both VE Day and VJ Day had been achieved. Once these were accomplished and the World and America was ready to settle down to both Peace and Prosperity. The "New Technology" was, of course was TELEVISION! And we would surely need something else than "Roller Derby" and "Wrestling From Marigold Arena" to fill up the broadcast hours. And while at first, the time that a TV Station had anything on, except that portrait of that Mohican Chief (Test Pattern, Schultz!) Very soon and with post haste, the Networks began tapping their existing Natural Resources, their existing programming! Virtually all would be ripe for adaptation to the TV Screen.

So, the folks over at Lone Ranger, Incorporated were very interested when Producers Jack Chertok, Harry Poppe, Sherman Harris and Jack Wrather all approached them with a deal to put The Masked Man and Tonto on the Television waves, as well as the Radio.

Immediately they went to work and gave us the first season, which made use of the considerable back log of Radio Dramas, all potentially adaptable to TV dramas. They cast Clayton Moore, a fine supporting actor in many a feature film, and with about a dozen years experience. He also had done some work in Serials over at Republic Pictures' "Thrill Factory", which would be invaluable experience in doing "THE LONE RANGER". Cast as his "faithful Indian companion" and partner in bringing Justice to various parts of the Frontier, we had sheer perfection in character-supporting Actor, Jay Silverheels.** We must mention that there was that rift in about '53, when Clayton Moore walked and was replaced with John Hart. After a season or so, Mr. Moore was back in-having been missed so much! Now, Back to Our Story!! The first years of filming gave the episodes a look and a sound all of their own. They made good use of off screen Narrator, which gave these shows a feel of authenticity and an individual, stand-out one of a kind series. The actors employed were all veterans of the movies of the late silent era thru the 1930's and 1940's. A lot of them had been just about exclusively "Cowboy Movie" players. A good example of these is the casting of Glenn Strange (Bartender Sam on "GUNSMOKE") as the vicious, murderous Gang Leader, Butch Cavandish. And it was the Cavendish Gang's massacre of the Texas Rangers that led to the origin of John Reid (thought to have been slain with the other Texas Rangers) as the "LONE RANGER".

In addition to the old timers in the cast, you will find a lot of new and up and coming talent (then) in the cast. We see people like Phyllis Coates, Dwayne Hickman, Denver Pyle and others in the cast from week to week. All of this, along with an always calling for fair-play, justice and peace in a western world.

The last couple of seasons brought some big changes. First was the use of Colour Filming. That made no difference as a Colour TV Set was still a long way off for our household. The second was a new set of musical themes and queues. (Other than Rossini's Finale from "U NO Wutt!") The new music was never a big deal to us, as we preferred the "old Radio" stock stuff.

With this series and two Feature Films done during this period, THE LONE RANGER (Warner Brothers, 1956) and THE LONE RANGER AND THE LOST CITY OF GOLD (United Artists, 1958), the character has been permanently and indelibly impressed in our identity as a People, we Americans!

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