Edit
Captain Video and His Video Rangers (TV Series 1949–1955) Poster

Trivia

During the Vietnam War, American soldiers who were taken as Prisoners of War by the North Vietnamese were often interrogated and asked whom the American military leaders were. Reportedly, several POWs would respond with "Captain Video." The North Vietnamese interrogators, being extremely gullible, accepted this answer. This allowed the POWs to escape possible torture and avoid giving the identities of the real military leaders.
6 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Al Hodge, who played Captain Video for most of the series' run, and Hal Conklin, who played his nemesis, Dr. Pauli, both died in March 1979 in New York City.
6 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Set in the 22nd century, there were 51+ serialized stories in all, totaling 1,537 episodes. The show was 30 minutes in length, but for the first few years approximately half of the program consisted of serialized excerpts from old B-Westerns. Thes segments were supposed to depict Video's "agents". Eventually - likely by Summer, 1952 - these clips were phased out in favor of full length Captain Video adventures. In mid-September, 1953, the program reverted to a 15 minutes running time. Until late in 1950 there was no Wednesday episode, but it was seen on Saturday. (NOTE: This statement is questionable.) By 1951, the series' level of sophistication had become much more finely-honed. Scripts came from top science-fiction writers and consultants, and many Broadway stage actors were cast. At its peak, over 125 stations carried the series, including many non-DuMont affiliates. The first TV-to-Hollywood spin-off, a 15-chapter serial from Columbia Pictures (Captain Video, Master of the Stratosphere (1951) with a different cast), came from this program in 1951, and a Saturday-morning TV series (The Secret Files of Captain Video (1953)) began in 1953. However, despite the program's immense popularity, the DuMont network's insurmountable problems caused it to cease operations by 1955. While other DuMont programs were continued on other networks, DuMont refused to sell "Captain Video" to NBC, and Al Hodge returned as the Captain to host a local cartoon/documentary film series over New York station WABD, the former DuMont flagship. DuMont's television archive was destroyed by a successor after it's collapse. The total number of stories is probably closer to 100, and the episodes may number higher than 1,537, but remaining information only accounts for 51 stories.
4 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
This series inspired the first board game (The Captain Video Space Game, early 1950) to be based on a television program.
3 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The show's theme song was the beginning of the overture to Richard Wagner's opera "Der Fliegender Hollander (The Flying Dutchman)"
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Arthur C. Clarke's short story "Arms Race" (written especially for his collection "Tales from the White Hart") is based on his experiences writing for the show.
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The show was able to tap the talents and resources of the Broadway stage during its run. A number of well-known writers and players were able to work on the series. In its first two seasons, the writing staff included Willie Gilbert, George Lowther, Larry Weinstock and Carey Wilber, among others. From 1951 to 1955, the writers included James Blish, Arthur C. Clarke, Damon Knight, Cyril M. Kornbluth, J.T. McIntosh, Robert Sheckley and Jack Vance, among others.
3 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The Captain Video character was ranked #25 in TV Guide's list of the "25 Greatest Sci-Fi Legends" (1 August 2004 issue).
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
David Lewis TV debut.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
On some Thursday nights TV viewers and classic music lovers could get to hear The series' main theme "Overture to The Flying Dutchman" an extra time, as it was was also used on several episodes of "The Lone Ranger'(1949), seen later on ABC.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
On one occasion, an episode ended with "Captain Video" and "The Video Ranger" encountering a lab explosion. As this was strictly live TV, and "Captain Video" had to go quickly from one scene to another, the next days' episode began with "Captain Video", as usual, in the control tower, with facial bandages quite visible, under his helmet.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Frank Sutton`s TV debut.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Captain Video flew three craft: the X-9 jet plane, and his flagships the Galaxy and Galaxy II spaceships.
1 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Lawrence Menkin, who created the series, thought of it as "a western in outer space" (and applied that simile to the later Star Trek (1966) as well).
1 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Captain Video was an agent of, and worked for, the Solar Council of the Interplanetary Alliance.
1 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Robert Hastings' TV debut.
0 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

Contribute to This Page