6.5/10
247
11 user 3 critic

Vice Versa (1948)

Businessman Paul Bultitude is sending his son Dick to a boarding school. While holding a magic stone from India, he wishes that he could be young again. His wish is immediately fulfilled ... See full summary »

Director:

Writers:

(novel),
Reviews
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Kay Walsh ...
...
David Hutcheson ...
...
...
Patricia Raine ...
Alice
Joan Young ...
Mrs. Grimstone
Vida Hope ...
1st Nanny
...
2nd Nanny
Ernest Jay ...
Bowler
Kynaston Reeves ...
Dr. Chawner
...
Judge
...
Lord Gosport
Andrew Blackett ...
Duke of Margate
Edit

Storyline

Businessman Paul Bultitude is sending his son Dick to a boarding school. While holding a magic stone from India, he wishes that he could be young again. His wish is immediately fulfilled and the two change bodies with each other. Mr Bultitude becomes a school boy who smokes cigars and has a very conservative view on child upbringing, while his son Dick becomes a gentleman who spends his time drinking lemonade and arranging children's parties. Written by Mattias Thuresson

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

1 March 1948 (UK)  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Costume designer Nadia Benois was the mother of director Peter Ustinov. See more »

Crazy Credits

Costume Designer and Corsetry Supervisor: Mme. Nadia Benois See more »

Connections

Version of Your Favorite Story: Vice Versa (1953) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Another identity exchange farce...directed by Peter Ustinov...
28 September 2007 | by (U.S.A.) – See all my reviews

In the tradition of films like TURNABOUT and FREAKY Friday, VICE VERSA attaches the theme to a couple of males this time, in a British comedy written and directed by Peter Ustinov that tries too hard to be clever, but succeeds, instead, in being exceedingly foolish.

ANTHONY NEWLEY is a Victorian schoolboy who trades places with his stuffy British father by wishing on a magic stone from India. Newley brings his father's knowledge and stuffiness to the school that he returns to, much to the bewilderment of his classmates and professors. The father, ROGER LIVESEY, adopts childish preferences rather than smoking his favored cigars and confounds his household servants.

You have to be a fan of overly broad, non-subtle British humor to fully enjoy this comedy. Most of it is beyond silly, however delightful the performances are. Especially absurd is the confrontation of battle swords in a duel over a young woman, played for zany humor but somehow missing the mark.

None of it can be taken seriously, so your enjoyment of the story will depend entirely on whether or not you favor this sort of humor. Newley does a decent enough job as the young boy and Livesey seems to be enjoying himself in a comic role, looking and sounding an awful lot like Nigel Bruce behind his scruffy mustache.

Anyone with a sharp eye will notice that so many of the story ingredients are used in FREAKY Friday, but American style.

Too overdone for my taste.


5 of 9 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?