5.8/10
47
8 user

Variety Time (1948)

Approved | | Comedy, Music | 21 August 1948 (USA)

Director:

Writers:

(Jack Paar material), (Edgar Kennedy screenplay)
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Cast

Credited cast:
Frankie Carle ...
Orchestra Leader
...
Rudy La Paix
...
Leon Errol (footage from 'Hired Husband') (archive footage)
...
Edgar's Mother-in-Law (from "I'll Build It Myself") (archive footage)
...
Dorothy Errol (footage from 'Hired Husband') (archive footage)
...
Edgar Kennedy (footage from 'I'll Build It Myself') (archive footage)
...
Florence Kennedy (footage from 'I'll Build It Myself') (archive footage)
Lynn Royce & Vanya ...
Speciality dancers
...
Mr. Drinkwater (footage from 'Hired Husband') (archive footage)
...
Master of Ceremonies
Jack Rice ...
Edgar's Brother-in-Law (footage from 'I'll Build It Myself') (archive footage)
...
Aunt Jessie (footage from 'Hired Husband') (archive footage)
Miguelito Valdés ...
Miguelita
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Storyline

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Genres:

Comedy | Music

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

21 August 1948 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Connections

References Superman (1941) See more »

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User Reviews

Cripes! No wonder RKO went under
24 October 2005 | by (New York, NY) – See all my reviews

Gruesome collection of RKO cast-offs, with a few variety acts bolstered, if that's the word, by large swatches of two shorts with Leon Errol and Edgar Kennedy. These last two play like prehistoric versions of UPN or WB sitcoms, all obvious slapstick and cross-eyed slow burns. Interspersed are some negligible specialty dancing, big bands, and silent shorts with "comic" sub-MST3K commentary. Jack Paar, in his screen debut, does maintain some Bob Hope aplomb, even though his jokes about Hollywood circa 1947 aren't funny. There are two lovely minutes of the great vaudevillian Pat Rooney clog-tapping to "The Daughter of Rosie O'Grady," and a slapstick dancing threesome are noteworthy if only for their sheer bizarreness. The rest can be fast-forwarded through.


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