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A Southern Yankee (1948)

 -  Comedy | History | War  -  5 August 1948 (USA)
6.9
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Ratings: 6.9/10 from 281 users  
Reviews: 16 user | 2 critic

A hapless bellboy in a St. Louis hotel near the end of the Civil War is recruited by the Union secret service to impersonate a notorious Confederate spy.

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(story), (story), 2 more credits »
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Title: A Southern Yankee (1948)

A Southern Yankee (1948) on IMDb 6.9/10

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Cast

Credited cast:
...
Aubrey Filmore
...
Kurt Devlynn
...
Sallyann Weatharby
George Coulouris ...
Maj. Jack Drumman aka The Grey Spider
Lloyd Gough ...
Capt. Steve Lorford
...
Capt. Jed Calbern
Minor Watson ...
Gen. Watkins
Charles Dingle ...
Col. Weatherby
Art Baker ...
Col. Clifford M. Baker
Reed Hadley ...
Fred Munsey
Arthur Space ...
Mark Haskins
Joyce Compton ...
Hortense Dobson
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Byron Foulger ...
Mr. Duncan (scenes deleted)
Edward Gargan ...
Male Nurse (scenes deleted)
Bert Moorhouse ...
Capt. Jeffreys (scenes deleted)
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Storyline

Aubrey Filmore (Red Skelton) is a bumbling bellboy in a Missouri town who pesters the Union officers there; he desperately wants to be a spy for the North in the American Civil War. When Filmore accidentally waylays an infamous Confederate spy known as "The Grey Spider" and is mistaken for him by the Rebels, the Union brass see it as an opportunity for real espionage - and though Filmore is a coward as well as a fool, his real motivation for derring-do is a sweet Southern girl named Sallyann, whom he will see again behind Southern lines. Written by Gary Dickerson <slug@mail.utexas.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

HE'S A SPY FOR BOTH SIDES! See more »

Genres:

Comedy | History | War | Western

Certificate:

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

5 August 1948 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A Southern Yankee  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

No one could figure out a simple, yet funny way to get Aubrey out of the house when he was being held captive by the angry dog. Buster Keaton, employed by MGM as a roving gag man, was called to the set, looked at the set up, and came up with the idea of removing the door hinges and letting the dog in as Aubrey got out. The most famous gag in the movie took Keaton all of five minutes to devise. See more »

Goofs

Mention of prisoner exchange is mentioned by the colonel. Prison exchanges wee stopped by Grant in 1864, the first union commander who realized the road to victory lay through attrition. See more »

Quotes

Aubrey Filmore: Let's talk about living.
See more »

Connections

References Our Hospitality (1923) See more »

Soundtracks

Dixie
(uncredited)
Attributed to Daniel Decatur Emmett in 1850s minstrel shows
Instrumental version heard on soundtrack under battle.
See more »

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User Reviews

 
A smart and funny comedy
2 June 2004 | by See all my reviews

Red Skelton shines in this funny stereo-typical movie from the forties. All in all, the movies feels as though it was written for Bob Hope whom I personally dislike in the movies. Skelton and Hop both used double entendres and fast quipped one-liners to good effect. The funny plot includes a union hotel bellhop who mistakenly finds and captures the most dangerous spy of the confederates during the civil war and is asked by superiors to impersonate him because if he were caught, it would not matter, he being dispensable. So start the laughs and they come at a minute a dime including a classic scene at a hospital involving a chase and a couple of dentists. Brilliant. Arlene Dahl does what she does and that is look extremely beautiful. It is said Buster Keaton worked behind the scenes on this movie and some have compared it to the General but I don't see the resemblance. The movie it most resembles is Bob hope's The Paleface, a scathological spoof of genres as this movie is. When you get to see it, have fun.


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