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Silent Dust (1949)

 -  Drama  -  29 December 1949 (USA)
7.3
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Ratings: 7.3/10 from 33 users  
Reviews: 3 user | 1 critic

A wealthy blind man is determined to build a cricket pavilion as a memorial to his dead son, who was killed in battle in World War II. Not long before the dedication ceremony is to be held,... See full summary »

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Title: Silent Dust (1949)

Silent Dust (1949) on IMDb 7.3/10

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Cast

Cast overview:
Stephen Murray ...
Robert Rawley
Beatrice Campbell ...
Joan Rawley
George Woodbridge ...
Foreman
Seymour Hicks ...
Lord Clandon
Marie Lohr ...
Lady Clandon
Edgar Norfolk ...
Simpson
James Hayter ...
Pringle
Yvonne Owen ...
Nellie
Sally Gray ...
Angela Rawley
Derek Farr ...
Maxwell Oliver
Nigel Patrick ...
Simon Rawley
Irene Handl ...
Cook
Maria Var ...
Cafe Singer
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Storyline

A wealthy blind man is determined to build a cricket pavilion as a memorial to his dead son, who was killed in battle in World War II. Not long before the dedication ceremony is to be held, the son shows up; it turns out that he wasn't killed in battle but deserted, and has become a blackmailer and a killer. He wants to get some money to "start a new life", but his blind father senses that something is wrong and sets out to find out what's going on. Written by frankfob2@yahoo.com

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

29 December 1949 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Silent Dust  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Soundtracks

Quand Vous Chante
(uncredited)
Music by George Melachrino
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User Reviews

 
Dust to dust
6 May 2013 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

Blind, wealthy Stephen Murray (Robert Rawley) is disciplined and very matter-of-fact. He is wealthy and is the head figure of a country estate. He is organizing a memorial to his son (who was shot dead during WW2) to be unveiled when he is visited by Seymour Hicks (Lord Clandon). Hicks plays a far more sympathetic character and asks Murray to dedicate the memorial to all of the 50 or so villagers who never came back from the war, not just to his son. Murray refuses. At this point, we don't like Murray. One night, Nigel Patrick (Simon Rawley) shows up. Yep - he's the son.....and he's not been killed. He has quietly sneaked back to ask for money to make his escape as an army deserter. He hides in the house and the cast gradually become aware of his presence until he has a confrontation with his dad at the end, for which there can only be one outcome.

Stephen Murray and Nigel Patrick are the standout characters in the film. They are unpleasant people who I find quite likable, and this is due to the way that they deliver their dialogue. Blind Stephen Murray becomes more sympathetic as the film progresses as he stumbles across various anomalies in the household that he runs. Nigel Patrick is great as a lying 'spiv' - his recounting of his life story when he was supposedly on the run is very effectively told against a flashback of what actually happened - a great contrast.

I wasn't sure where the film was going for the first quarter of an hour or so, and was dreading that I had purchased a British comedy because of the comedy music used to accompany Seymour Hicks on his bicycle. Thankfully not. Things pick up with the arrival of Nigel Patrick and its a joy to watch from then on. I do wonder why they pick women that look the same - schoolboy error in the casting department - Sally Carr (Angela) and Beatrice Campbell (Joan) are thoroughly interchangeable. The best female role goes to the housekeeper Yvonne Owen (Nellie).

Overall, some great scenes, some good dialogue and a film worth seeing again.


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