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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2003

11 items from 2016


Patrick Wilson Wishes Jessica Biel Were Dead In Trailer For ‘A Kind Of Murder’

28 June 2016 11:42 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Alfred Hitchcock long had a fascination with the fine line between wishing someone dead and doing the deed (“Rope,” “Strangers On A Train“) and that vibe gets a workout in the ’50s-set “A Kind Of Murder.” Directed by Andy Goddard, starring Patrick Wilson, Jessica Biel, Haley Bennett, Vincent Kartheiser, and Eddie Marsan, and based on […]

The post Patrick Wilson Wishes Jessica Biel Were Dead In Trailer For ‘A Kind Of Murder’ appeared first on The Playlist. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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National Gay Killers Day. What? Ewww!

21 May 2016 7:36 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Because we're having fun with this little feature we'll continue. On this day in history as it relates to the movies...

1881 Ahead of her time Clara Barton founds the American Red Cross. She doesn't get a biopic because Hollywood is only interested in "Great Man" biopics

1916 Happy Centennial to author Harold Robbins who penned 25 best-sellers some of which became famous movies like The Carpetbaggers (1964), the Elvis flick King Creole (1958), and the notorious Pia Zadora Razzie winner The Lonely Lady (1983)

Rope (1949) and Swoon (1992) - two great movies inspired by the Leopold & Loeb case

1924 Chicago college students Leopold & Loeb murder a teenage boy in a "thrill killing." Their crime inspires the story of the gay deviants in Alfred Hitchcock's Rope (1949), the Cannes Best Actor winning Compulsion (1958) and is recreated in the New Queer Cinema classic Swoon (1992)

1926 Kay Kendall of Les Girls (1957) fame is born

1952 Two time Oscar nominee John Garfield (best »

- NATHANIEL R

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Daily | “Queer Cinema Before Stonewall”

22 April 2016 7:31 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

An Early Clue to the New Direction: Queer Cinema Before Stonewall, a series opening today at the Film Society of Lincoln Center and running through May 1, is "an unapologetic, unmitigated, mesmerizingly diverse assembly of 23 feature-length movies and 25 shorts that constitutes a kaleidoscopic portrait of self-discovery and shame," writes Wesley Morris in the New York Times. "This gamut covers a lot of ground, too: the winking mannerism of Alfred Hitchcock (Rope), the dimensional experimentalism of Gregory Markopoulos (Twice a Man, with a young Olympia Dukakis), the serene classicism of Vincente Minnelli (Tea and Sympathy), the icebox psycho-expressionism of Ingmar Bergman (Persona)." We're gathering previews. » - David Hudson »

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Watch: 4-Minute Video Details All The Edits In Alfred Hitchcock’s Classic ‘Rope’

8 April 2016 11:26 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Jimmy Stewart collaborated with Alfred Hitchcock four times, but their first endeavor together was 1948’s “Rope,” based on the play by Patrick Hamilton. Inspired by the notorious killing of a 14-year-old boy by Leopold and Loeb in the 1920s, “Rope” is the second of Hitch’s “limited setting” films (after 1944’s “Lifeboat”) and takes place largely in the same apartment. It also sees Stewart as a dark, manipulative college professor (the ubiquitous good guys always make the best villains, don’t they?) who pushes two of his students (the terrific Farley Granger and John Dall) against each other, which leads them to do the unthinkable and commit murder. Read More: Watch: 9-Minute Video Essay Examines How Alfred Hitchcock Brilliantly Blocks A Scene In an experimental turn, “Rope” is Hitchcock’s first Technicolor film, and, for those who haven’t seen it, gives off the illusion that it is all shot »

- Samantha Vacca

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Victoria review – gripping one-take thriller on the streets of Berlin

31 March 2016 7:30 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Captured in a continuous 138-minute shot, Sebastian Schipper’s stylish heist movie is carried along on a giant wave of adrenaline and logistical daring

Sebastian Schipper’s Victoria is a gripping heist drama set on the streets of Berlin that plays out in real time in one continuous, 138-minute camera shot, carried along on a giant skittery wave of adrenaline and logistical daring. Shooting this must have felt like pulling off an actual bank job, with the mind-boggling levels of planning and imposture it surely entailed. Like a bank robber, Schipper must have been terrified of some random passerby showing up and wrecking everything.

Now, there’s traditionally a fair bit of cinephile machismo involved in the continuous tracking shot, both doing it and praising it. No movie flourish draws attention to itself quite as emphatically as this, with its swaggering mastery of time and space. Despite murky nightclub scenes, »

- Peter Bradshaw

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Watch: 9-Minute Video Essay Examines How Alfred Hitchcock Brilliantly Blocks A Scene

24 March 2016 7:45 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

It’s safe to say most filmmakers today have learned something from Alfred Hitchcock, if not been directly influence. The master filmmaker's resumé speaks for itself — “Rear Window,” “Psycho,” “Rebecca,” “Notorious,” “Strangers on a Train,” “Rope,” “The Birds,” “North by Northwest,” “Shadow of a Doubt” and “Dial M for Murder” — and his remarkable grasp on technical prowess in achieving big screen spectacle has been rarely matched. And among the things Hitchcock knew best about filmmaking was how to stage a scene, as broken down and analyzed by Nerdwriter1 in his latest video, “How Alfred Hitchcock Blocks A Scene.” Read More: Watch: 7-Minute Video Essay Explores Ensemble Staging In Bong Joon-Ho's 'Memories Of Murder' Taking a closer look at an early scene in “Vertigo” — the 1958 picture some cinephiles would argue is not only Hitchcock’s greatest work, but also quite possibly the best film of all-time — the nine-minute »

- Will Ashton

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I Confess

23 January 2016 4:50 PM, PST | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

What's it all about, Alfie? The master of suspense goes in an unusual direction with this murder mystery with a Catholic background. And foreground. Actually, it's a regular guidebook for proper priest deportment, and it's so complex that we wonder if Hitchcock himself had a full grip on it. Montgomery Clift is extremely good atop a top-rank cast that includes Anne Baxter and Karl Malden. Rated less exciting by audiences, this is really one of Hitch's best. I Confess Blu-ray Warner Archive Collection 1953 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 94 min. / Street Date February 16, 2016 / available through the WBshop / 17.95 Starring Montgomery Clift, Anne Baxter, Karl Malden, Brian Aherne, Roger Dann, Dolly Haas, Charles Andre, O.E. Hasse. Cinematography Robert Burks Art Direction Edward S. Haworth Film Editor Rudi Fehr Original Music Dimitri Tiomkin Written by George Tabori, William Archibald from a play by Paul Anthelme Produced and Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson »

- Glenn Erickson

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Actor Douglas Dick in Alfred Hitchcock's Rope Dead at 95

7 January 2016 9:00 PM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

The actor Douglas Dick has died at the age of 95. His family announced the news in an obituary in The Los Angeles Times. Dick. who appeared in Alfred Hitchcock's thriller Rope, died peacefully in his sleep at his home in Los Angeles on Dec. 19, 2015. As well as an esteemed actor, Dick's family noted that Dr. Douglas M. Dick was also a naval officer, writer and psychologist. In 1960 he starred alongside Elvis Presley and Barbara Eden in Flaming Star. He was described by his family as "an honest, intelligent, charitable and principled man, was an active member of the Academy »

- George Stark, @GeorgeStark_

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Actor Douglas Dick in Alfred Hitchcock's Rope Dead at 95

7 January 2016 9:00 PM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

The actor Douglas Dick has died at the age of 95. His family announced the news in an obituary in The Los Angeles Times. Dick. who appeared in Alfred Hitchcock's thriller Rope, died peacefully in his sleep at his home in Los Angeles on Dec. 19, 2015. As well as an esteemed actor, Dick's family noted that Dr. Douglas M. Dick was also a naval officer, writer and psychologist. In 1960 he starred alongside Elvis Presley and Barbara Eden in Flaming Star. He was described by his family as "an honest, intelligent, charitable and principled man, was an active member of the Academy »

- George Stark, @GeorgeStark_

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Douglas Dick, a Dinner Guest in Alfred Hitchcock’s 'Rope,' Dies at 95

7 January 2016 3:20 PM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Douglas Dick, who starred in such films as Rope, directed by Alfred Hitchcock, and John Huston’s The Red Badge of Courage before exiting show business to work as a psychologist, has died. He was 95. The actor died Dec. 19 in his sleep in his Los Angeles home, his family announced. Dick played the indecisive dinner guest Kenneth Lawrence in Rope (1948), the first of Hitchcock’s Technicolor movies. The crime drama takes place in one room and is edited so as to appear as one continuous shot. Dick played a major in Mark Robson’s Home of the Brave (1949) and

read more

»

- Mike Barnes

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Notebook's 8th Writers Poll: Fantasy Double Features of 2015

4 January 2016 6:41 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

How would you program this year's newest, most interesting films into double features with movies of the past you saw in 2015?Looking back over the year at what films moved and impressed us, it is clear that watching old films is a crucial part of making new films meaningful. Thus, the annual tradition of our end of year poll, which calls upon our writers to pick both a new and an old film: they were challenged to choose a new film they saw in 2015—in theatres or at a festival—and creatively pair it with an old film they also saw in 2015 to create a unique double feature.All the contributors were given the option to write some text explaining their 2015 fantasy double feature. What's more, each writer was given the option to list more pairings, with or without explanation, as further imaginative film programming we'd be lucky to catch »

- Notebook

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2003

11 items from 2016


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