The Red Shoes
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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2001

15 items from 2014


Dear Kodak By Martin Scorsese

5 August 2014 6:04 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Following a campaign by leading film directors getting Hollywood studios to accept a film stock quota in order to avert closure of the beleaguered Kodak factory, the good news was relayed that a deal had been struck and the operation will remain open for the foreseeable future. Yet a permanent shift to digital is only just around the corner and with that in mind a true heavyweight of the medium (and Chair of the Film Foundation) Martin Scorsese has weighed in using a typically eloquent turn of phrase.

Anyone who has seen one of his fascinating documentaries, such as A Personal Journey Through American Movies or read about his championing of the works of Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (The Red Shoes), much less watched his films themselves, will know Scorsese has been steeped in cinema from an early age. Who better to mount a short but heartfelt defence of »

- Steve Palace

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Best Criterion Titles to Buy During Barnes & Noble's 50% Off Sale

30 June 2014 3:54 PM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Barnes & Noble has just kicked off their 50% off Criterion sale and while it's impossible to suggest titles that will suit everyone looking to beef up their collection at this perfect time of year, I will do my best to offer some suggestions. Let's get to it... My Absolute First Pick I am almost done going through this collection and it was a collection I got for Christmas under these exact circumstances. Typically priced at $224.99, you can now get this amazing set of 25 Zatoichi films for only $112. Box sets, in my opinion, are what sales like this were made for. Zatoichi: The Blind Swordsman Next Ten Recommendations It isn't easy so this is a collection of just some of my favorite films (of all-time and within the collection) and a little variety, though pretty much my standard, go to Criterion first picks, especially if you are just starting out. Persona Breathless »

- Brad Brevet

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Filming Dance in "Test"

24 June 2014 12:07 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

One of this year's best indies Test is about a young understudy dancer in San Francisco. Though it's only made a teensy bit of money in a microscopic theatrical run (that's happening to more and more indies) at one point it climbed to the top 15 on iTunes' indie chart.

Test's dance troupe at rehearsal

It's a topic for another time perhaps but I wonder how far we are away from box office reports that include money from On Demand and iTunes now that so many films hit all three venues at once or in quick succession?

The following are unused excerpts (edited for length) from my Towleroad interview last week with Chris Mason Johnson the director. I thought they were well suited to you cinephile savvy musical-friendly nuts anyway. It's rare that we get such attentively filmed and beautiful dancing onscreen so I had to ask him about the »

- NATHANIEL R

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Exclusive Interview with Director Chris Mason Johnson for ‘Test’

10 June 2014 1:04 PM, PDT | LatinoReview | See recent LatinoReview news »

A few movies would venture into portraying the AIDs scare amongst the homosexual community of the 1980s.

In Chris Mason Johnson’s “Test,” rather than celebrating the death from AIDs, unlike many movies do, it showcased the community living in fear of the disease and the panics surrounding it.

The film is set around the free-spirited San Francisco of 1985 as it follows a young dancer in a modern dance company who must deal with the fear of disease, homophobia, effeminophobia during that period. And his ultimate escapism was through the music and dance.

The dance drama was on the film festival circuit for some time and won two grand jury prizes at Outfest.

Latino-Review had an exclusive phone interview with director Chris Mason Johnson last week. We discussed about the AIDs epidemic of the 1980s, homophobia, and the changes for gay cinema through the years.

Test” is currently in theaters »

- Gig Patta

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​'Gaslight': 7 Everlasting Legacies of the Ingrid Bergman Classic

9 May 2014 10:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

1. The term "gaslight." The Ingrid Bergman thriller "Gaslight" -- released 70 years ago this week, on May 4, 1944, wasn't the original use of the title. There was Patrick Hamilton's 1938 play "Gas Light," retitled "Angel Street" when it came to Broadway a couple years later. And there was a British film version in 1939, starring Anton Walbrook (later the cruel impresario in "The Red Shoes") and Diana Wynyard.

Still, the glossy 1944 MGM version remains the best-known telling of the tale, with the title an apparent reference to the flickering Victorian lamps that are part of Gregory's (Charles Boyer) scheme to make wife Paula (Bergman) think she's seeing things that aren't there, thus deliberately undermining her sanity in order to have her institutionalized so that he'll be free to ransack the ancestral home to find the missing family jewels.

This version of Hamilton's tale was so popular that it made the word "gaslight"into a verb, »

- Gary Susman

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James Cameron's Avatar: five years on

28 April 2014 2:29 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Feature Ryan Lambie 30 Apr 2014 - 06:27

Five years after James Cameron's Avatar appeared in cinemas, we look back at its hype, its critical backlash, and how it holds up today...

Before 1960, director Michael Powell was one of the UK’s most respected directors, with a string of acclaimed films to his name, among them A Matter Of Life Or Death, The Red Shoes and Black Narcissus. Then Powell made Peeping Tom, and the critical backlash ruined him.

An intimate character study of a serial killer made at a time when such things were entirely out of the ordinary in British cinema, Peeping Tom was savaged by UK film critics, and it took a full decade for Powell’s film to be reappraised; the likes of Martin Scorsese and Robert Ebert championed Peeping Tom, but their admiration arrived entirely too late to save Powell’s filmmaking career, which was never the »

- ryanlambie

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Tribeca Film Review: ‘Ballet 422’

20 April 2014 3:13 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Director Jody Lee Lipes delivers an exhilarating third feature with “Ballet 422,” tracing the two-month creation of a new work by New York City Ballet dancer/choreographer Justin Peck. Sampling various stages of the process from initial conception through rehearsals to premiere performance, the documentary moves with the same fluidity that characterizes Peck’s choreography. Himself a noted cinematographer, Lipes captures the dancers, musicians, costumers and lighting designers from a variety of angles within the larger canvas, always suggesting kinetic movement continuing beyond the frame. A delight for balletophiles, the film reps a beautifully crafted entree into the intricacies of collective endeavor.

Lipes makes films about artists at work (“Brock Enright: Good Times Will Never Be the Same,” “NY Export: Opus Jazz,”), and “Ballet 422” focuses on the 25-year-old Peck as he conceives and shapes his third choreographed piece for Nycb, “Paz de la Jolla.” Expectations run high, given the »

- Ronnie Scheib

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Watch: Martin Scorsese Talks Characters & Directors Who Took Bold Risks

8 April 2014 9:28 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Martin Scorsese knows a thing or two about taking risks—there aren't many 71-year-old directors who stake their reputation on 3-hour depictions of orgiastic financial crime, or on similarly lengthy children's films about the earliest days of cinema and the internal politics of large train stations. But Marty does, so he seems a good person to ask about risk-taking in cinema, which is exactly what he does in this series of videos, dissecting briefly seven of his favourite risky directing decisions, from the very well-known—the risks Orson Welles took making “Citizen Kane”—and Scorsese's own well-established favourites, including the startling brilliance of Powell and Pressburger's “The Red Shoes,” a film whose directors Scorsese has spent much of his career boosting. But Scorsese also takes in lesser-known names. William Friese-Greene, for one, is not a name on many people's lips, but Scorsese as the consummate cinema historian knows all »

- Ben Brock

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Movie Poster of the Week: F.W. Murnau’s “Tabu” and the Posters of Boris Streimann

28 March 2014 9:13 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Above: 1978 re-release poster for Tabu (F.W. Murnau, USA, 1931)

I only recently came across the posters of German artist Boris Streimann (1908-1984)—who was known to also sign his work as B. Namir—and was immediately struck by both the dynamism and the color of his work. The author of hundreds, if not thousands, of posters from the late 20s through the late 60s, Streimann loved diagonals. All of the posters I have selected— the best of his work that I could find—work off a strong diagonal line, with even his varied and very inventive title treatments (which could have been the work of another designer) often placed on an angle. On top of the sheer energy and movement of his posters, his use of color is extraordinary: brash and expressionistic like his brushwork. I especially love the multi-colored accordion in Port of Freedom, the loin cloth in Tabu, and »

- Adrian Curry

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Martin Scorsese's Top 10 Criterion Films

28 February 2014 8:26 AM, PST | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

The Criterion Collection has just released a new filmmaker top ten and this time it's Martin Scorsese getting the honors and he has quite a lot to say about each. The list includes obvious titles such as The Red Shoes, 8 1/2, The Leopard, Ashes and Diamonds and others as they were all on his list of Top 12 Films of All-Time from back in 2012. Nevertheless, it remains fascinating to read his words and reasoning. For example, I find it interesting to see him placing Roberto Rossellini's Paisan at #1. So often Rome Open City is the most talked about of Rossellini's fabulous War Trilogy (read my review) and so infrequently you hear about Paisan or Germany Year Zero, the latter of which is an absolute stunner. I've never sen Jean Renoir's The River or Francesco Rosi's Salvatore Giuliano, but the rest I've viewed. I'm not a huge fan of The Leopard, »

- Brad Brevet

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English Heritage honours London flat that was base for Powell and Pressburger

17 February 2014 4:31 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

British film duo Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger's film company, the Archers, produced classics including A Matter of Life and Death and The Red Shoes

Martin Scorsese: why I restored Colonel Blimp

In the dog days of the second world war, the heart of British cinema could be found inside a three-room flat off the Marylebone Road in London. This, from 1942-1947, was the headquarters of film-makers Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, and the production office for such pictures as A Matter of Life and Death, The Red Shoes and The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp. In the event of air raids, the office came equipped with a set of camp beds.

Now the flat at Dorset House has been commemorated with an English Heritage blue plaque, honouring the work of Powell and Pressburger's film company, the Archers. Attending the unveiling were Powell's widow, the Oscar-winning American editor Thelma Schoonmaker, »

- Xan Brooks

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Martin Scorsese hails Powell and Pressburger at blue plaque unveiling

17 February 2014 10:12 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Wolf of Wall Street director pays tribute to 'extraordinary' work of British film-making greats honoured by English Heritage

Martin Scorsese paid tribute to the British film-making greats Powell and Pressburger as he helped to unveil a plaque in their honour.

Following his visit to the Bafta awards, the film director attended a ceremony on Monday unveiling the English Heritage blue plaque on the duo's London office.

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger were behind some of the most celebrated British films of their era such as The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp, Black Narcissus, The Red Shoes and A Matter of Life and Death.

The plaque has been placed outside the office at Dorset House in Gloucester Place, Marylebone, which served as a base for their production company, The Archers, from 1942 to 1947.

In keeping with the austerity of those days, their office was sparsely decorated, with camp beds in case of air-raid warnings, »

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2014 TCM Classic Film Festival to Open with Gala Screening of Newly Restored Oklahoma!

13 February 2014 6:45 PM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Turner Classic Movies (TCM) will open the 2014 edition of the TCM Classic Film Festival with the world premiere of a brand new restoration of the beloved Rodgers & Hammerstein musical Oklahoma! (1955). TCM’s own Robert Osborne, who serves as official host for the festival, will introduce Oklahoma!, with the film’s star, Academy Award®-winner Shirley Jones, in attendance. Vanity Fair will also return for the fifth year as a festival partner and co-presenter of the opening night after-party. Marking its fifth year, the TCM Classic Film Festival will take place April 10-13, 2014, in Hollywood. The gathering will coincide withTCM’s 20th anniversary as a leading authority in classic film.

In addition, the festival has added several high-profile guests to this year’s lineup, including Oscar®-winning director William Friedkin, who will attend for the screening of the U.S. premiere restoration of his suspenseful cult classic Sorcerer (1977); Kim Novak, who »

- Melissa Thompson

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Channel 4's Big Ballet shows that this is an art form that should be open to all | Deborah Orr

7 February 2014 4:07 PM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Dance can improve the health and happiness of people of all body shapes – but too often those who don't conform to the professional ideal are shut out, and that's a great shame

There is, I think, a very serious point at the heart of Channel 4's new three-part reality show, Big Ballet. That point is not about being fat or being thin. It's about differences in gender attitudes to work and leisure that go back centuries. Not that any of this is intentional or explicit in the show, which, if last Thursday's opening episode is anything to go by, follows the formula of an established contemporary genre. The contention of the show's presenter, the former Royal Ballet principal dancer Wayne Sleep, is simply that anyone and everyone should have access to classical ballet as a means of enjoyment and exercise, however they look. He's right. Why not?

The reason why not is complex. »

- Deborah Orr

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‘Wolf of Wall Street’ Editor on Scorsese and that Infamous Candle Sex Scene

7 January 2014 10:00 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Scrambling to get “The Wolf of Wall Street” ready for awards season, Martin Scorsese leaned on the nimble touch of longtime editor Thelma Schoonmaker.

At 73, Schoonmaker has been an essential cog in the director’s moviemaking machine for more than three decades, winning the Oscar for editing on “Raging Bull,” “The Aviator” and “The Departed.” “Wolf” marks Schoonmaker’s 19th collaboration with Scorsese (and the filmmaker’s fifth with Leonardo DiCaprio) and presented a different set of challenges.

The shooting script, based on the memoirs of Jordan Belfort, a corrupt stockbroker, was already 162 pages long. And Scorsese stretched the story further when he asked his actors to freely improvise, resulting in reels of footage that resembled a documentary. The first cut of the film ran four hours.

Even though there was some talk about releasing “Wolf” in two parts, the real solution was to continue trimming throughout the fall. A »

- Ramin Setoodeh

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2001

15 items from 2014


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