IMDb > Red River (1948)
Red River
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Red River (1948) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
7.8/10   18,052 votes »
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Down 14% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Directors:
Howard Hawks
Arthur Rosson (co-director)
Writers:
Borden Chase (screenplay) and
Charles Schnee (screenplay) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Red River on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
17 September 1948 (USA) See more »
Tagline:
Greatest Spectacle Ever! See more »
Plot:
Dunson is driving his cattle to Red River when his adopted son, Matthew, turns against him. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 2 wins & 2 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
Epic Cattle Drive See more (151 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

John Wayne ... Thomas Dunson

Montgomery Clift ... Matt Garth

Joanne Dru ... Tess Millay

Walter Brennan ... Nadine Groot

Coleen Gray ... Fen (as Colleen Gray)

Harry Carey ... Mr. Melville (as Harry Carey Sr.)

John Ireland ... Cherry Valance

Noah Beery Jr. ... Buster McGee

Harry Carey Jr. ... Dan Latimer
Chief Yowlachie ... Quo (as Chief Yowlatchie)

Paul Fix ... Teeler Yacey

Hank Worden ... Simms Reeves
Mickey Kuhn ... Matt - as a Boy
Ray Hyke ... Walt Jergens
Hal Taliaferro ... Old Leather (as Hal Talliaferro)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Lane Chandler ... Colonel (uncredited)
Davison Clark ... Mr. Meeker (uncredited)
Harry Cording ... Gambler (uncredited)

Richard Farnsworth ... Dunston Rider (uncredited)
Paul Fierro ... Fernandez (uncredited)
George Lloyd ... Rider with Melville (uncredited)
Pierce Lyden ... Colonel's Trail Boss (uncredited)
Frank Meredith ... Train Engineer (uncredited)
John Merton ... Settler (uncredited)
Jack Montgomery ... Drover at Meeting (uncredited)
Ivan Parry ... Bunk Kenneally (uncredited)
Lee Phelps ... Gambler (uncredited)
William Self ... Sutter - Wounded Wrangler (uncredited)
Carl Sepulveda ... Cowhand (uncredited)
Chief Sky Eagle ... Indian Chief (uncredited)
Ray Spiker ... Wagon Train Member (uncredited)
Glenn Strange ... Naylor (uncredited)
Tom Tyler ... Quitter (uncredited)

Dan White ... Laredo (uncredited)
Guy Wilkerson ... Pete (uncredited)

Shelley Winters ... Dance Hall Girl in Wagon Train (uncredited)

Directed by
Howard Hawks 
Arthur Rosson (co-director)
 
Writing credits
Borden Chase (screenplay) and
Charles Schnee (screenplay)

Borden Chase (from "The Saturday Evening Post" story)

Produced by
Howard Hawks .... producer
Charles K. Feldman .... executive producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
Dimitri Tiomkin (music composed by)
 
Cinematography by
Russell Harlan (photographed by)
 
Film Editing by
Christian Nyby (film editor)
Francis Lyon (uncredited)
Jack Murray (uncredited)
 
Casting by
Dave Gunreth 
 
Art Direction by
John Datu  (as John Datu Arensma)
 
Makeup Department
Lee Greenway .... makeup
George Bau .... assistant makeup artist (uncredited)
Don L. Cash .... makeup department head (uncredited)
Mary Freeman .... hair stylist (uncredited)
Dotha Hippe .... hair stylist (uncredited)
Frank La Rue .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Anna Malin .... key hair stylist (uncredited)
Margaret Martin .... head hairdresser (uncredited)
Maudlee McDougall .... assistant hair stylist (uncredited)
Web Overlander .... makeup artist (uncredited)
 
Production Management
Norman A. Cook .... production manager (as Norman Cook)
M.W. Kennedy .... assistant production manager
Walter Mayo .... production manager (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
William McGarry .... assistant director
Joseph C. Cavalier .... second assistant director (uncredited)
Arthur Rosson .... second unit director (uncredited)
Arthur Siteman .... assistant director: second unit (uncredited)
Joe Wonder .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
John F. Austin .... set dresser
Lester Hallett .... assistant property master
Howard Harbough .... standby painter
Harry Apperson .... drapery department head (uncredited)
Oscar Brodin .... studio construction department head (uncredited)
Jack Colconda .... 1st prop man (uncredited)
Al Hersh .... 2nd prop man (uncredited)
Winston Jones .... 2nd prop man (uncredited)
V.L. McFadden .... construction superintendent (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Richard DeWeese .... sound mixer
Jack Gard .... boom operator
Earl Crain Jr. .... boom operator (uncredited)
Larry Gannon .... cable man (uncredited)
Slim Houghton .... cable man (uncredited)
Gordon Sawyer .... studio sound department head (uncredited)
Cecil Shephard .... cable man (uncredited)
Frank Webster .... sound mixer (uncredited)
Kenneth C. Wesson .... sound recordist (uncredited)
 
Special Effects by
Donald Steward .... special effects
Allen Q. Thompson .... special photographic effects (as Allan Thompson)
Jack Caffee .... department head (uncredited)
Perzy High .... 3rd assistant (uncredited)
 
Stunts
Richard Farnsworth .... stunts (uncredited)
Ben Johnson .... stunts (uncredited)
Fred Kennedy .... stunts (uncredited)
Danny Sands .... stunts (uncredited)
Riley R. Waters .... stunt double: John Wayne (uncredited)
Jack Williams .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Dave Donlon .... best boy
Otto Johnson .... 1st assistant grip
Earl Stafford .... assistant camera
Palmer 'Pete' Swenson .... best boy electric
Pete Bernard .... 2nd man grip (uncredited)
Ray Binger .... second unit director of photography (uncredited)
Roy Black .... gaffer (uncredited)
George T. Clemens .... camera operator (uncredited)
Cleo Crabtree .... gaffer (uncredited)
Bert Eason .... assistant camera (second unit) (uncredited)
Carl Gibson .... grip department head (uncredited)
Henry Maak .... 2nd company grip (uncredited)
Robert Rhea .... assistant camera (uncredited)
James Ryan .... 3rd assistant grip (uncredited)
Herman Selgrath .... studio grip department head (uncredited)
John D. Thompson .... 1st company grip (uncredited)
Thomas Thompson .... grip (uncredited)
John D. Weiler .... camera operator (second unit) (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Chuck Arrice .... wardrobe assistant
Howard Child .... wardrobe assistant
Saul Jick .... tailor
Wesley Jeffries .... men's wardrobe (uncredited)
Jack E. Miller .... wardrobe department head (uncredited)
Adele Parmenter .... women's wardrobe (uncredited)
Nevada Penn .... wardrobe assistant (uncredited)
Fred Starns .... wardrobe (uncredited)
John Zacha .... wardrobe (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
Olive Hofmann .... negative cutter
Barbara Ford .... assistant editor (uncredited)
Stewart S. Frye .... assistant editor (uncredited)
Bernard Loftus .... feature editor (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Dimitri Tiomkin .... music director
Vinton Vernon .... music recorder
Lucien Cailliet .... orchestrator (uncredited)
David Chudnow .... music department head (uncredited)
Jester Hairston .... choral director (uncredited)
Paul Marquardt .... orchestrator (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Howard Alston .... accountant
Bea Benjamin .... comptroller
Grant Butler .... publicity assistant
Betty Church .... publicity secretary
Bob Clarke .... wrangler
Scoop Conlon .... publicity director
Andrew A. Dexter .... payroll
'Doc' Elliott .... assistant wrangler
Betty Evans .... accountant
Howard Hawks .... presenter
Don Hill .... first aid nurse
Ruth Horth .... payroll
Dorothy Huefner .... secretary
Stella Jacobs .... clerk
Cliff Lewis .... head publicist
Irene Lewis .... nurse
Sol London .... studio manager
John E. McDermott .... comptroller
Robert Shaw .... publicity assistant
Josephine Woods .... production secretary
Sid Davis .... stand-in: John Wayne (uncredited)
Gordon G. Jones .... wrangler boss (uncredited)
Helen McSweeney .... secretary to producer (uncredited)
Gus Schroeder .... location manager (uncredited)
Bobbie Sierks .... script clerk (uncredited)
Don Wyman .... paymaster (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
133 min | West Germany:92 min | USA:126 min (original theatrical version)
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Recording)
Certification:
Australia:PG (TV rating) | Australia:G (original rating) | Finland:K-12 | Netherlands:18 (original rating) (1948) | Norway:16 | Sweden:15 (cut) | UK:U | USA:Approved (PCA #12398) | West Germany:12 (nf)
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
During production, many members of the cast and crew caught illnesses and injuries. Howard Hawks was hospitalized for several days after being stung by a centipede. John Wayne caught a severe cold. Joanne Dru suffered from influenza.See more »
Goofs:
Revealing mistakes: Matthew Garth seems to beat Thomas Dunson to the draw in a mock contest orchestrated by Dunston and Groot Nadine. However the gun is already in Garth's right hand in order to fool the audience, as evidenced by the his empty holster as he walks away.See more »
Quotes:
Thomas Dunson:Who are you?
Cherry Valance:Some call me one thing, some another.
Thomas Dunson:What do they call you most?
Cherry Valance:By my name. Cherry Valance.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
Bury Me Not on the Lone PrairieSee more »

FAQ

Did McMurtry use this as the basis for Lonesome Dove?
See more »
23 out of 30 people found the following review useful.
Epic Cattle Drive, 19 July 2006
Author: Lechuguilla from Dallas, Texas

Dimitri Tiomkin's thunderous score sets the tone for this rousing story of cowboy ranchers in nineteenth century Texas headed north, with a thunderous herd of cattle in tow. It's the archetypal story of the American West, with its strong, ethical male leader, Thomas Dunson (John Wayne), and his pursuit of a big dream, set in an era when men were men, times were tough, hardships were inevitable, guns ruled, and Native Americans were the bad guys. What a saga ...

What makes "Red River" such a grand adventure is its high quality. Its story is simple, direct, exciting, and well told, with complex characters, interesting and sympathetic because they show weakness as well as strength. Dunson is a good man, but he's stubborn and headstrong. His semi-adopted son, Matt (Montgomery Clift), is good with a gun but a little softhearted. Dunson's chief sidekick is Groot (Walter Brennan), a cantankerous old buzzard who has problems with his teeth.

It's the relationship between these three men that is the heart and soul of "Red River". Trouble ensues along the way, you can be sure. And how that trouble unfolds and plays out presents viewers with engaging human drama, and humor, centered on these three main characters. The lonesome High Plains, with all its inherent risks, adds grandeur to the epic story.

At strategic points in the film, the page of a book appears on screen with text that briefly summarizes upcoming events. It's like we, the viewers, are reading a book about some long ago trailblazers. It's a technique that could have been intrusive. But here, it is handled with such finesse that it actually helps the narrative, by functioning as a transition from one sequence to the next.

The acting is fine. John Wayne is more than convincing as Dunson. Walter Brennan is characteristically funny. And Montgomery Clift is terrific. Had he maintained his looks, and if real-life circumstances not intervened, Monty could have been one of the truly top actors through at least the 50s and 60s.

If the film has a weakness, it might be the cinematography. Not often, but at times, the actors appear to be standing in front of a canvas, an effect that renders a shallow depth of field. Maybe this was the result of technical limitations of photography at the time the film was made.

There are few film westerns that can compare in quality with "Red River". And I don't know of any other cinematic cattle drives that are this good. So, the next time you herd your cattle to market, this is the film to watch. Even if you have no cattle, "Red River" is still a wonderfully entertaining cinematic experience.

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (151 total) »

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