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The Paleface (1948)

Not Rated | | Comedy, Family, Western | 16 February 1949 (France)
Calamity Jane is despatched to find out who's smuggling rifles to the Indians, and winds up married to a hapless correspondence school dentist as part of her cover.

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Writers:

(original screenplay) (as Edmund Hartmann), (original screenplay) | 1 more credit »
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Won 1 Oscar. Another 2 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Terris
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Toby Preston (as Robert Watson)
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Jasper Martin (as Jack Searl)
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Indian Scout
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Gov. Johnson
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Hank Billings
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Commissioner Emerson
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Jeb
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Chief Yellow Feather
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Chief Iron Eyes
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Village gossip
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Storyline

Someone is selling guns to the Indians and in order to find the culprit Calamity Jane and a secret agent go undercover posing as man and wife. When the agent is killed Jane recruits a new husband -- none other than innocent dupe "Painless" Peter Potter, a totally inept dentist and confirmed coward who's main goal is to leave the barbaric west far behind. When their wagon train is attacked by the Indians it's Jane's sharpshooting that saves the day, but she gives the credit to Potter making him an instant hero to the townspeople and instant target to both the Indians and the gunrunners. Written by A.L.Beneteau <albl@inforamp.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

A Perfect Team! A Perfect Theme! A Perfect Scream! They Belong Together! See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Family | Western

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

16 February 1949 (France)  »

Also Known As:

A sápadt arcú  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Recording)

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In 1968, Don Knotts and Barbara Rhodes starred in a remake of "The Paleface" titled "The Shakeiest Gun In the West" (Universal 1968). See more »

Goofs

When the gunrunners arrive in the Indian village they are seen to be travelling in a covered-wagon in one shot, and on an open buckboard covered with furs in the next shot. See more »

Quotes

Potter: Ladies and gentlemen, at this time, I'd like to say a few words.
Pioneer: Oh, let's get out of here before them redskins come back.
Potter: Those are the words!
See more »

Connections

Featured in Paramount Presents (1974) See more »

Soundtracks

Buttons and Bows
by Jay Livingston and Ray Evans
Sung by Bob Hope
See more »

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User Reviews

 
The Paleface Is What Made Jane Russell's Career
22 June 2006 | by (Buffalo, New York) – See all my reviews

The Paleface one of the funniest films Bob Hope ever did was a godsend to the career of Jane Russell. Take a look at her film credits and see how few there were during the Forties. She did The Outlaw which kept going in and out of release every time Howard Hughes re-edited it. She did a film called The Young Widow which she hated and was a box office flop and then The Paleface.

Although Howard Hughes kept messing around with The Outlaw and kept Russell off the screen for most of the Forties, the man did know about publicity and certainly kept her name before the public. But a movie star has to make movies. So even Hughes realized that and I'm sure he exacted a good price for Russell's services to Paramount for The Paleface.

Hope of course is his usual character. A recent graduate of a dentistry college, he's gone west to seek fame and fortune, Hope the schnook gets tangled up with the notorious Calamity Jane.

Of course Russell is Calamity Jane, she's being offered a pardon in order to trap some no good outlaws selling weapons to the Indians. When her contact is killed and she nearly is also, she picks up Hope and they get married and join a wagon train.

Of course the some of the funniest stuff in The Paleface when Russell does some fancy shooting and let's Hope take the credit for it, giving him an undeserved reputation for fearlessness. One of my favorite bits is when Iron Eyes Cody gets a hold of some of Hope's laughing gas and Hope thinks he's Russell behind a barrier.

Bob Hope got to introduce his second Oscar winning song in The Paleface, Buttons and Bows by the Paramount contract song writers, Jay Livingston and Ray Evans. He sold a few records of it, but the real big hit was done by Dinah Shore. It's now become identified with Russell as well, but she sings it in Son of Paleface, not here.

This was Bob Hope's first trip to the American west in search of laughs and it was a successful expedition.


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