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Eddie Redmayne to pocket role as Fagin

If you thought that becoming an Oscar-winning actor meant that all of Eddie Redmayne’s dreams had been realised, then you’d be wrong – until now that is. The Theory of Everything star has been in talks to play Fagin in a reboot of Oliver!, a role he has wanted to play from a very young age.

He may also be lining-up alongside superstar-songstress Adele, who herself has been linked with the part of Nancy.

And Redmayne can hold a note with the best of them, as he proved in 2012’s Les Miserables, so prepare for a memorable version of You’ve Got to Pick a Pocket or Two, Fagin’s main contribution to the piece. When he was a mere ten years old, he appeared in a Sam Mendes (no less) stage production of the Dickens-inspired musical, as workhouse boy No43, and ever since then has harboured the ambition
See full article at The Cultural Post »

All of the Films Joining Filmstruck’s Criterion Channel This July

Each month, the fine folks at FilmStruck and the Criterion Collection spend countless hours crafting their channels to highlight the many different types of films that they have in their streaming library. This July will feature an exciting assortment of films, as noted below.

To sign up for a free two-week trial here.

Saturday, July 1 Changing Faces

What does a face tell us even when it’s disguised or disfigured? And what does it conceal? Guest curator Imogen Sara Smith, a critic and author of the book In Lonely Places: Film Noir Beyond the City, assembles a series of films that revolve around enigmatic faces transformed by masks, scars, and surgery, including Georges Franju’s Eyes Without a Face (1960) and Hiroshi Teshigahara’s The Face of Another (1966).

Tuesday, July 4 Tuesday’s Short + Feature: Premature* and Ten*

Come hitch a ride with Norwegian director Gunhild Enger and the late Iranian master
See full article at CriterionCast »

Alien Star John Hurt Dies At 77

Alien star John Hurt has passed away today at the age of 77. He had been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer back in 2015, but at this time we’re unsure if that was the cause of death. The actor is survived by Anwen Rees-Myers, his wife of 12 years, and his two sons, Alexander and Nicholas.

The British film legend was a beloved, Academy Award-nominated talent with an incredibly accomplished career spanning six decades. Notable credits include V For Vendetta, Midnight Express, The Elephant Man, Harry Potter, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (a personal favorite of mine) and many, many more. So well recognized was Hurt that he even received a knighthood from Queen Elizabeth II in 2014 for his tremendous work.

Born in Chesterfield, Derbyshire in 1940, he was the youngest of three children. Though he wasn’t allowed to see movies when he was younger, at the age of eight he was sent to
See full article at We Got This Covered »

DVD Review – The Small World of Sammy Lee (1963)

The Small World Of Sammy Lee, 1963.

Directed by Ken Hughes.

Starring Anthony Newley, Julia Foster and Robert Stephens.

Synopsis:

The compère of a seedy strip club struggles to keep one step ahead of the bookies to whom he owes money.

Before video came along, the only way to see a film was at the cinema or on TV. As such as soon as the dawn of home release (with VHS evolving into DVD’s, and now Blu-ray) came, there was an entire history of film to catch up on in terms of releasing. The more iconic films would take precedent, or the box office success. Or some older films could be caught in a mire of rights issues due to folded companies or sold rights. British cinema boomed in the 60’s, yet finding available releases of some lost nuggets of gold can be tough and good releases even more difficult.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

The Capacity to Hope: Terence Davies Discusses "Sunset Song"

  • MUBI
Sunset Song is Terence Davies’s touching epic of love, hope, and tragedy at the dawn of the Great War. The story centers on a young woman, Chris Guthrie (Agyness Deyn), and the hardship of living in rural Scotland at the time, while looking at the themes of patriarchal and dysfunctional family life whose exploration originally hailed Davies as an auteur.Fernando F. Croce, covering the film for the Notebook, wrote from Toronto:"A passion project for the great British filmmaker with a decade-long production history of false starts, this adaptation of Lewis Grassic Gibbon's 1932 Scottish novel emerges as a full-bodied reverie of faces and landscapes, splendor and pain."We talked to Terence Davies following the world premiere of Sunset Song at the Toronto International Film Festival. This conversation contains spoilers of the film’s story.Notebook: What made you interested in this novel? How did it fit with your personality as a filmmaker?
See full article at MUBI »

After Christopher Lee, Another Nonagenarian British Actor Has Died: Oscar Nominee Moody

Ron Moody in 'Oliver!' movie. Ron Moody: 'Oliver!' actor nominated for an Oscar dead at 91 (Note: This Ron Moody article is currently being revised.) Two well-regarded, nonagenarian British performers have died in the last few days: 93-year-old Christopher Lee (June 7, '15), best known for his many portrayals of Dracula and assorted movie villains and weirdos, from the title role in The Mummy to Dr. Catheter in Gremlins 2: The New Batch. 91-year-old Ron Moody (yesterday, June 11), among whose infrequent film appearances was the role of Fagin, the grotesque adult leader of a gang of boy petty thieves, in the 1968 Best Picture Academy Award-winning musical Oliver!, which also earned him a Best Actor nomination. Having been featured in nearly 200 movies and, most importantly, having had his mainstream appeal resurrected by way of the villainous Saruman in Peter Jackson's The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit movies (and various associated merchandising,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Ron Moody obituary

Actor best known for playing Fagin in Lionel Bart’s film and stage musical Oliver!

Ron Moody, who has died aged 91, saw himself not as a great comic actor – above all as Fagin in Lionel Bart’s Oliver! on stage and screen – but as a writer and as a composer of musicals. Most of the world could never quite be persuaded to agree. He wrote more than a dozen (mostly unperformed) musicals and a clutch of (mostly published) novels, and could be an explosively funny after-dinner speaker for theatre charities. To everything he did, he brought a questioning anarchic flair.

When the possibility of creating the role of Dickens’s miserly mentor of child pickpockets arose, he was wary: “At first I never wanted to do it. They told me there was this musical of Oliver Twist so I went to see the Alec Guinness film [Oliver Twist, 1948], which I found to
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Australian Actor Kerr Dead at 92: Best Known for Peter Weir Movies, British TV Series Doctor Who

Doctor Who’ actor Bill Kerr, also featured in Peter Weir’s ‘Gallipoli’ and ‘The Year of Living Dangerously,’ dead at 92 (photo: Bill Kerr and Patrick Troughton in ‘Doctor Who’) Australian actor Bill Kerr, best known internationally for a guest spot in the 1960s TV series Doctor Who, and for his supporting roles in the Peter Weir movies Gallipoli and The Year of Living Dangerously, died on August 28 (or 29, according to some sources), 2014, while watching the TV show Seinfeld at his home in Perth, West Australia. Kerr, whose exact cause of death is unclear, was 92. Born William Kerr on June 10, 1922, in Capetown, South Africa, to Australian vaudevillian parents touring the country, Bill Kerr grew up in Australia, where he became a popular television, stage, and film personality. His show business career began at an early age. “My mother took about 10 weeks off to have me, and when she returned to the
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Oswald Morris obituary

Oscar-winning British cinematographer who worked on a wide range of film classics

The Oscar-winning British cinematographer Oswald Morris, who has died aged 98, will be remembered for many classics, including Moulin Rouge, Fiddler on the Roof, Moby Dick and Lolita. He worked with some of the great directors, John Huston, Sidney Lumet, Carol Reed, Stanley Kubrick and Franco Zeffirelli. Many of Morris's films are landmarks in the history of colour cinematography. For Moulin Rouge (1952) he used filters to create a style reminiscent of paintings by Toulouse-Lautrec. For Fiddler on the Roof (1971), which won him an Oscar, he filmed with a silk stocking over the lens to give a sepia effect.

Morris also shot popular favourites such as The Guns of Navarone (1961), Oliver! (1968), The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1965) and The Man Who Would Be King (1975), and photographed acting luminaries: Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Burton, Gregory Peck and Humphrey Bogart.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Oswald Morris, Oscar And BAFTA-winning Cinematographer, Dead At Age 98

  • CinemaRetro
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Ossie Morris signs a copy of his 2006 autobiography 'Houston, We Have a Problem' for Matthew Field in February of this year.

 

Oscar-winning British cinematographer Oswald Morris passed away Monday evening at his home in Dorset, England. He was 98 years old.

A founding member and former president of the Bsc (the British Society of Cinematographers), 'Ossie', as he was known to all in the business, won an Academy Award in 1971 for the musical Fiddler on the Roof and four Baftas, including one for The Hill (1965) starring Sean Connery. His early career included working on David Lean's Oliver Twist and John Huston's Moulin Rouge. Ossie worked on over 40 major productions in his life, including Oliver!, The Wiz, The Guns of Navarone, Equus, The Man Who Would be King, and many, many more.

Retro's Matthew Field met the great man at his home just a few weeks ago, in what
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Review: "Oliver!" (1968) Starring Ron Moody, Mark Lester And Oliver Reed, Twilight Time Blu-ray Limited Edition

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer 

The magnificent Oscar-winning best picture of the year for 1968, Oliver!, has been released as a Blu-ray special limited edition (3,000 units) by Twilight Time. This adaptation of the smash stage hit was a dream project for director Lewis Gilbert but, much to his dismay, the director's seat was given to Sir Carol Reed. How Gilbert's version of the film would have differed will never be known but suffice it to say, it's hard to imagine he could have improved on Reed's vision. There had been numerous previous screen versions of Dickens' classic novel Oliver Twist, with the most notable being David Lean's 1948 movie with a star-making turn by Alec Guinness as Fagin. The 1963 stage musical by Lionel Bart was a sensation and it stood to reason that the screen rights were quickly scooped up. The film went against the tide when considering other major musicals of the period.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Long Before Obi-Wan There Were the Eight D'Ascoynes: Guinness Day

Alec Guinness: Before Obi-Wan Kenobi, there were the eight D’Ascoyne family members (photo: Alec Guiness, Dennis Price in ‘Kind Hearts and Coronets’) (See previous post: “Alec Guinness Movies: Pre-Star Wars Career.”) TCM won’t be showing The Bridge on the River Kwai on Alec Guinness day, though obviously not because the cable network programmers believe that one four-hour David Lean epic per day should be enough. After all, prior to Lawrence of Arabia TCM will be presenting the three-and-a-half-hour-long Doctor Zhivago (1965), a great-looking but never-ending romantic drama in which Guinness — quite poorly — plays a Kgb official. He’s slightly less miscast as a mere Englishman — one much too young for the then 32-year-old actor — in Lean’s Great Expectations (1946), a movie that fully belongs to boy-loving (in a chaste, fatherly manner) fugitive Finlay Currie. And finally, make sure to watch Robert Hamer’s dark comedy Kind Hearts and Coronets
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Guinness' Pre-Star Wars Years: Versatile - and Highly Controversial - Characterizations

Alec Guinness movies: Pre-’Star Wars’ Guinness runs the gamut from Dickens’ Fagin to Japanese businessman romancing Rosalind Russell Alec Guinness is Turner Classic Movies’ “Summer Under the Stars” star on Saturday, August 3, 2013. The bad news: No Alec Guinness TCM premieres or lesser-known Guinness movies, e.g., A Run for Your Money, Last Holiday, Malta Story, The Prisoner, Star Wars (kidding). The good news: Alec Guinness movies are always welcome, even when the movies themselves are unworthy of his talents — and there were quite a few of those — or when Guinness forces his characters to fit his persona (instead of the other way around), so that we’re watching Alec Guinness play Alec Guinness playing some role or other, instead of, for instance, a Japanese businessman who happens to be both Star Trek‘s George Takei’s father and Rosalind Russell’s platonic paramour. (TCM schedule: Alec Guiness movies.) (Photo: Alec Guinness ca.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Nosher Powell obituary

Heavyweight boxer, James Bond stuntman and bodyguard to Hollywood stars

The abiding memory that millions around the world will have of Nosher Powell, who has died aged 84, is of him fighting in vain to save his aeroplane after it had been attacked by a seagull in Those Magnificent Men in their Flying Machines (1965). Gert Fröbe may have been the German officer in charge of the plane but it was Powell who, as the stuntman and double, ended up in the water.

Powell's first appearance as a stuntman was in Laurence Olivier's Henry V (1944). He also had small roles in David Lean's Oliver Twist (1948) and Cosh Boy (1953), with Joan Collins. In 1952 he was a boxer in Emergency Call, in which he fought the former world champion Freddie Mills. Powell had a decent if not outstanding boxing career himself, reaching No 3 in the British heavyweight rankings.

George Frederick Bernard Powell was born in Camberwell,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Nosher Powell obituary

Heavyweight boxer, James Bond stuntman and bodyguard to Hollywood stars

The abiding memory that millions around the world will have of Nosher Powell, who has died aged 84, is of him fighting in vain to save his aeroplane after it had been attacked by a seagull in Those Magnificent Men in their Flying Machines (1965). Gert Fröbe may have been the German officer in charge of the plane but it was Powell who, as the stuntman and double, ended up in the water.

Powell's first appearance as a stuntman was in Laurence Olivier's Henry V (1944). He also had small roles in David Lean's Oliver Twist (1948) and Cosh Boy (1953), with Joan Collins. In 1952 he was a boxer in Emergency Call, in which he fought the former world champion Freddie Mills. Powell had a decent if not outstanding boxing career himself, reaching No 3 in the British heavyweight rankings.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Stuart Freeborn obituary

Makeup artist who created Yoda and Chewbacca for the Star Wars films

If there was a film made in Britain between the early 1940s and early 1980s that required innovations in makeup and prosthetics design, chances are that Stuart Freeborn, who has died aged 98, was involved in it in some capacity. The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp, David Lean's adaptation of Oliver Twist, 2001: A Space Odyssey, The Omen, Star Wars, The Empire Strikes Back: all these benefited from Freeborn's pioneering approach to makeup. When audiences gaze with wonder upon the apes in the "dawn of man" sequence at the beginning of 2001, or fall under the spell of the 2ft tall guru Yoda and his gnomic proclamations, their response is a testament to Freeborn's persuasive artistry.

He was born in Leytonstone, east London, where it was assumed that he would follow in the footsteps of his father,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

In Memoriam: Makeup Artist Extraordinaire Stuart Freeborn (1914-2013)

The film world has lost one of the giants of movie makeup and creature design. Stuart Freeborn, whose credits go back to the 1930s, died earlier this week from a combination of ailments due to his age, according to The Guardian. He was 98. He worked for David Lean on 1948's Oliver Twist, setting up Alec Guinness with his prosthetic teeth, and later worked with Guinness and Lean on The Bridge on the River Kwai.Freeborn was brought to my attention thanks to another series of films starring Guinness. As the principal artist behind the creature shop on the first Star Wars film, Freeborn was responsible for the team that created Chewbacca. The costume was designed based upon designs that had been created for Stanley Kubrick's earlier...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Stuart Freeborn, Yoda's maker, dies

Stuart Freeborn, Yoda's maker, dies
Stuart Freeborn, the British pioneering movie makeup artist behind creatures such as Yoda and Chewbacca in the Star Wars films, has died. He was 98.

LucasFilm confirmed Wednesday that Freeborn had died, "leaving a legacy of unforgettable contributions".

Star Wars director George Lucas said in a statement that Freeborn was "already a makeup legend" when he started working on the space epic.

"He brought with him not only decades of experience but boundless creative energy," Lucas said. "His artistry and craftsmanship will live on forever in the characters he created. His Star Wars creatures may be reinterpreted in new forms by new generations but at their heart they continue to be what Stuart created for the original films."

Freeborn's granddaughter, Michelle Freeborn, said he died on Tuesday in London from a
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

'Star Wars' Makeup Man Stuart Freeborn Dies at 98

'Star Wars' Makeup Man Stuart Freeborn Dies at 98
Stuart Freeborn, the legendary British makeup artist who worked on films for Stanley Kubrick and David Lean and created such creatures as Yoda and Chewbacca for the Star Wars films, died Tuesday in London. He was 98. Freeborn transformed Alec Guinness into Fagin for Lean's 1948 version of Oliver Twist and aged Roger Livesay through the decades in another British film classic, Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger’s The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943). Photos: Hollywood's Notable Deaths of 2013 His other makeup credits include Powell’s The Thief of Bagdad (1940), Lean’s The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957),

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See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

'Star Wars' Makeup Artist Stuart Freeborn Dead at 98

  • The Wrap
'Star Wars' Makeup Artist Stuart Freeborn Dead at 98
Stuart Freeborn, the makeup artist who designed Yoda, Chewbacca and a number of other memorable "Star Wars" characters, died Wednesday in England. He was 98. Freeborn began his six-decade career in the movie business with uncredited work on 1936's "Rembrandt" before creating makeup magic for 75 other films, including "Oliver Twist," "Dr. Strangelove," 2001: A Space Odyssey," four "Superman" films and the original "Star Wars" trilogy. Also read: Disney Planning 'Star Wars' Spin-Off Films "Stuart was already a makeup legend when he started on 'Star Wars,'" George Lucas said in a statement on StarWars.com.
See full article at The Wrap »
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