The Lady from Shanghai
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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

4 items from 2015


Man From Reno Review

26 March 2015 5:15 PM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

There’s a light touch to much of Dave Boyle’s modern-noir Man from Reno, eschewing the usual aesthetic trappings of the genre, lulling the viewer into a false sense of comfort before inevitably pulling the rug out from under. The movie opens in the fog and climaxes on a sunny dock, rendering the so-called ambience of film-noir moot. The notion here that a noir doesn’t have to be set in run down alleys and shadowy high-contrast rooms and smoky bars to suggest something corrupt and malicious; a sunny dock and a warmly-lit hotel-room hold just as much, if not more, sinister intent. There’s something downright transgressive about using San Francisco in such a manner, the city that gave birth to the quintessential noirs The Lady From Shanghai & The Maltese Falcon now repurposed as their aesthetic counterpart. Two entwining storylines compete for attention. In the first, a successful »

- Tommy Cook

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New on Video: ‘The Lady from Shanghai’

24 March 2015 6:53 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The Lady from Shanghai

Written and directed by Orson Welles

USA, 1947

The Lady from Shanghai (1947) didn’t come easily for Orson Welles. No film ever really did after his breakthrough, the great Citizen Kane (1941), the movie that put him on the map and in the crosshairs of the Hollywood establishment. They wanted little to do with this iconoclastic hotshot from New York, and for the rest of his days, Welles struggled to achieve an autonomous artistic vision. That so many astonishing films came out of this struggle, like The Lady from Shanghai, surely says something about his cinematic gift, an inherent talent that could not be restrained or denied.

It took considerable wheeling and dealing for Welles to convince Harry Cohn to back the film. Welles had three features on his directorial résumé, and though Citizen Kane and The Magnificent Ambersons (1942) were not financially successful, his third film, The Stranger (1946), was. »

- Jeremy Carr

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From Orson Welles to Kurt Cobain, What to See at the Miami Film Festival

5 March 2015 12:48 PM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

The Miami International Film Festival (March 6-15) launches this weekend in balmy Florida with a full-bodied slate of international cinema. With its special focus on Ibero-American and Cuban films, the 32nd edition presents many North American premieres alongside hot circuit titles from Sundance, Cannes and beyond. From Sundance, acclaimed docs "Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck," Brett Morgan's portrait of the haunted Nirvana frontman, and "Best of Enemies," Robert Gordon and Morgan Neville's account of the televised sparring wars between William F. Buckley and Gore Vidal, touch down in Miami. Read More: Toronto Critics Go Crazy for Christian Petzold's "Phoenix" Cinephiles should know that the Miami Beach Cinematheque has partnered with the festival to present an Orson Welles retrospective featuring "Citizen Kane," "The Stranger," "The Lady From Shanghai," "Touch of Evil" and "Othello." Read More: Venice »

- Ryan Lattanzio

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Remembering Actress Simon Part 2 - Deadly Sex Kitten Romanced Real-Life James Bond 'Inspiration'

5 February 2015 7:53 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Simone Simon in 'La Bête Humaine' 1938: Jean Renoir's film noir (photo: Jean Gabin and Simone Simon in 'La Bête Humaine') (See previous post: "'Cat People' 1942 Actress Simone Simon Remembered.") In the late 1930s, with her Hollywood career stalled while facing competition at 20th Century-Fox from another French import, Annabella (later Tyrone Power's wife), Simone Simon returned to France. Once there, she reestablished herself as an actress to be reckoned with in Jean Renoir's La Bête Humaine. An updated version of Émile Zola's 1890 novel, La Bête Humaine is enveloped in a dark, brooding atmosphere not uncommon in pre-World War II French films. Known for their "poetic realism," examples from that era include Renoir's own The Lower Depths (1936), Julien Duvivier's La Belle Équipe (1936) and Pépé le Moko (1937), and particularly Marcel Carné's Port of Shadows (1938) and Daybreak (1939).[11] This thematic and »

- Andre Soares

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

4 items from 2015


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