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Bicycle Thieves (1948)

Ladri di biciclette (original title)
Not Rated | | Drama | 13 December 1949 (USA)
Trailer
2:00 | Trailer

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ON DISC
In post-war Italy, a working-class man's bicycle is stolen. He and his son set out to find it.

Director:

Writers:

(story), (novel) | 7 more credits »
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Top Rated Movies #95 | Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 18 wins. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
...
Lianella Carell ...
Elena Altieri ...
The Charitable Lady
Gino Saltamerenda ...
Giulio Chiari ...
Vittorio Antonucci ...
The Thief
Michele Sakara ...
Secretary of the Charity Organization
Fausto Guerzoni ...
Amateur Actor
Emma Druetti
Carlo Jachino ...
A Beggar

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Storyline

Ricci, an unemployed man in the depressed post-WWII economy of Italy, gets at last a good job - for which he needs a bike - hanging up posters. But soon his bicycle is stolen. He and his son walk the streets of Rome, looking for the bicycle. Ricci finally manages to locate the thief but with no proof, he has to abandon his cause. But he and his son know perfectly well that without a bike, Ricci won't be able to keep his job. Written by jolusoma

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

bicycle | thief | job | italy | search | See All (212) »

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

13 December 1949 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Bicycle Thieves  »

Box Office

Budget:

$133,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$11,845 (USA) (2 October 1998)

Gross:

$332,930 (USA) (3 September 1999)
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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (DVD edition)

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Even though Lamberto Maggiorani remained uncomfortable with the mechanics of filmmaking and acting, he nevertheless began to feel a merging of his own identity with that of his character Antonio. Vittorio De Sica later stated that Maggiorani "confessed to me that he had experienced this sensation, acutely and poignantly, in the last scene in the film: Antonio, in a moment of revolt against his cruel fate, attempts robbery and is arrested and maltreated in front of his son. When, through his tears, Lamberto Maggiorani felt his hand seized by little Staiola, it seemed to him that it really was his son who took his hand, and his tears became real tears of burning shame. In a few months of patient effort, I had brought this man to the point of being able to forget himself in his role and to enter fully into the sad story." See more »

Quotes

La Santona: [Addressing a young man seated before her, apparently seeking advice on his love life] You must plant your seeds in another field. Do you understand what I mean?
Young man seeking advice: No, I don't understand.
La Santona: It's simple, my boy. What good is planting seeds if the soil rejects them? You plant, but don't gather. Understand?
Young man seeking advice: I haven't understood a word.
La Santona: [Becoming impatient] She doesn't love you! Forget her!
La Santona: [Pausing for effect] Dear boy, you're very ugly. Yes, ugly. There are so many other women... Go and plow another ...
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Connections

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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Exceptional film which should be honored and treasured
9 May 2002 | by (Tucson, AZ) – See all my reviews

Italian Neorealism has always been one of my favorite film movements, and The Bicycle Thief appears to be one the finest examples of this medium. While people today might not understand the power in the story, one has to understand the nature state of Italy after World War II. The country was in ruins, and finding a good job was difficult. Desperation took over more often than reason, and this leads to the eventual climax of self pity and remorse. Quite a powerful film, for it is the only foreign film I have on my personal Top 25 list.


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