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Glamour Girl (1948)

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The marriage of Ray Royle (Jack Leonard) to recording company talent scout Lorraine (Virginia Grey) ends in divorce after she tries to dictate both his personal and professional life. Her ... See full summary »

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Title: Glamour Girl (1948)

Glamour Girl (1948) on IMDb 7/10

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Cast

Cast overview:
Gene Krupa and His Orchestra ...
Orchestra
Gene Krupa ...
Gene Krupa
Virginia Grey ...
Lorraine Royle
Michael Duane ...
Johnny Evans
Susan Reed ...
Jennie Higgins
Jimmy Lloyd ...
Buddy Butterfield
Jack Leonard ...
Ray Royle
Pierre Watkin ...
T.J. Hopkins
Eugene Borden ...
Luigi Tamarini
Netta Packer ...
Aunt Hattie Higgins
...
Gertrude
Jeannie Bell ...
Rosa
Carolyn Grey ...
Vocalist, Gene Krupa's Orchestra
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Storyline

The marriage of Ray Royle (Jack Leonard) to recording company talent scout Lorraine (Virginia Grey) ends in divorce after she tries to dictate both his personal and professional life. Her boss, T. J. Hopkins (Pierre Watkin) sends her to Memphis to sign a trio he admires. En route, she is forced to spend the night at a farmhouse where she hears Jennie Higgins (Susan Reed) sing folk songs and play the zither. Sensing that she would be a recording sensation, Lorraine takes Jennie back to New York without signing the trio. Higgins is furious and refuses to hear Jennie, so Lorraine and employees Johnny Evans (Michael Duane) and Buddy Butterfield ('Jimmy Lloyd') quit and start their own small record company. Johnny tells Lorraine they need a bigger name for their initial record, so Lorraine gets her ex-husband Ray arrange to have Jennie sing at the night club where he and Gene Krupa (Gene Krupa) and his Orchestra are appearing. Written by Les Adams <longhorn1939@suddenlink.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

GENE KRUPA'S drummin' SUSAN REED'S strummin' keep love in a recording studio hummin'! (insert card) See more »

Genres:

Drama | Music | Romance

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

16 January 1948 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Golden Girl  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Soundtracks

Molly Malone
(uncredited)
Traditional
Performed by Susan Reed
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User Reviews

Filling in the who-did-what blanks in the plot summary.

Which, since I wrote it (the IMDb summary, not the plot), I presume I can do.

Susan Reed was a folk singer,born in Columbia, South Caroline with part of her childhood years spent in Ashville, North Carolina, working mostly in NYC night clubs (Cafe Society Uptown for one), who usually accompanied her songs playing either a zither (mostly), harps or lutes. Her songs in this film were: "Turtle Dove," "The Soldier and the Lady," "Molly Malone," "Go Way From My Window" and "Black is the Color of My True Love's Hair." While billed 5th in the cast, she did get all upper-case letters but shared the line with a musical instrument...as in SUSAN REED AND HER ZITHER. Susan's Reed's non-P.C. attributes included more than just her zither.

Jack Leonard (not the comedian Jack E. Leonard) was a former vocalist with the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra and sings Jule Styne's and Sammy Cahn's "Anywhere" and "Without Imagination" written by Columbia Pictures' resident (mostly) songwriters Allan Roberts and Doris Fisher.

The musical offerings from the top billed GENE KRUPA AND HIS ORCHESTRA (16 musicians and vocalist Carolyn Grey)included a novelty number, "Gene's Boogie", by Segar Ellis and George Williams, and Krupa's rewritten-version of Rubenstein's "Melody in F."


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