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Lumière Festival: Bertrand Tavernier on His Lifelong Love of Classic Westerns

Lumière Festival: Bertrand Tavernier on His Lifelong Love of Classic Westerns
This year’s 9th Lumière Festival includes a section dedicated to classic American Westerns, selected by French helmer Bertrand Tavernier (“The French Minister”), who is also curating a collection of books dedicated to the genre, published by Actes Sud.

The fourteen films to be screened span the period between 1943 and 1962, including titles such as William A. Wellman’s “The Ox-Bow Incident” (1943), John Ford’s “My Darling Clementine” (1946), Howard Hawks’ “Red River” (1948), Delmer Daves’ “Broken Arrow” (1950), King Vidor’s “Man Without a Star” (1955) and John Ford’s “The Man who Shot Liberty Valance” (1962).

Tavernier will personally present each film. He has been a fan of American Westerns since he was a teenager and became an avid reader of Western novels as soon as he learned how to read English, in his early twenties.

Through this section and also a book collection published by Actes Sud, Tavernier is paying his own personal tribute to this quintessentially American genre. He is
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Curious Languor of Robert Mitchum

  • MUBI
Everyone notices the eyes first, languid, those of a somnambulist. Robert Mitchum, calm and observant, is a presence that, through passivity, enamors a viewer. His face is as effulgent as moonlight. The man smolders, with that boozy, baritone voice, seductive and soporific, a cigarette perched between wispy lips below which is a chin cleft like a geological fault. He’s slithery with innuendo. There’s an effortless allure to it all, a mix of malaise and braggadocio, a cocksure machismo and a hint of fragility. He’s ever-cool, a paradox, “radiating heat without warmth,” as Richard Brody said. A poet, a prodigious lover and drinker, a bad boy; his penchant for marijuana landed him in jail, and in the photographs from his two-month stay he looks like a natural fit. He sits, wrapped in denim, legs spread wide, hair shiny and slick, holding a cup of coffee. His mouth is
See full article at MUBI »

Mitchum Stars in TCM Movie Premiere Set Among Japanese Gangsters Directed by Future Oscar Winner

Robert Mitchum ca. late 1940s. Robert Mitchum movies 'The Yakuza,' 'Ryan's Daughter' on TCM Today, Aug. 12, '15, Turner Classic Movies' “Summer Under the Stars” series is highlighting the career of Robert Mitchum. Two of the films being shown this evening are The Yakuza and Ryan's Daughter. The former is one of the disappointingly few TCM premieres this month. (See TCM's Robert Mitchum movie schedule further below.) Despite his film noir background, Robert Mitchum was a somewhat unusual choice to star in The Yakuza (1975), a crime thriller set in the Japanese underworld. Ryan's Daughter or no, Mitchum hadn't been a box office draw in quite some time; in the mid-'70s, one would have expected a Warner Bros. release directed by Sydney Pollack – who had recently handled the likes of Jane Fonda, Barbra Streisand, and Robert Redford – to star someone like Jack Nicholson or Al Pacino or Dustin Hoffman.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

The top 25 underappreciated films of 1988

Our look at underappreciated films of the 80s continues, as we head back to 1988...

Either in terms of ticket sales or critical acclaim, 1988 was dominated by the likes of Rain Man, Who Framed Roger Rabbit and Coming To America. It was the year Bruce Willis made the jump from TV to action star with Die Hard, and became a star in the process.

It was the year Leslie Nielsen made his own jump from the small to silver screen with Police Squad spin-off The Naked Gun, which sparked a hugely popular franchise of its own. Elsewhere, the eccentric Tim Burton scored one of the biggest hits of the year with Beetlejuice, the success of which would result in the birth of Batman a year later. And then there was Tom Cruise, who managed to make a drama about a student-turned-barman into a $170m hit, back when $170m was still an
See full article at Den of Geek »

On the Hunt: The Films of James B. Harris

  • MUBI
CopAt the ripe age of twenty-six—the two were born within days of each other in 1928—James B. Harris and Stanley Kubrick formed Harris-Kubrick Productions. With Kubrick leading the charge behind the camera and Harris acting as the right-hand-man producer, the duo completed three major critical successes: The Killing (1956), Paths of Glory (1957), and Lolita (1962). But where Kubrick’s subsequent work has achieved a supreme, hall-of-fame stature, Harris’s own directorial career—consisting of five excellent movies made across a four-decade span—remains, despite the valiant effort of a few notable English-language critics (Michael Atkinson, Jonathan Rosenbaum), on the relative sidelines. The latest attempt to boost Harris’s reputation: BAMcinématek’s week-long retrospective of Harris’s producing and directing output, selected by “Overdue” co-programmers Nick Pinkerton and Nicolas Rapold.Harris and Kubrick stopped working together amidst a pre-production disagreement during the making of what would become Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb
See full article at MUBI »

Daily | Goings On | Afrofuturism, Wiseman, Noir Westerns

Ashley Clark, who's curated Space Is the Place: Afrofuturism on Film, the series that opened at New York's BAMcinématek yesterday and runs through April 15, picks out a few highlights for the Guardian, including John Coney's Space Is the Place with Sun Ra, Ngozi Onwurah's Welcome II the Terrordome, John Akomfrah's The Last Angel of History and Terence Nance's An Oversimplification of Her Beauty. Also, more on Walerian Borowczyk, an overview of the career of producer and director James B. Harris, a major Frederick Wiseman retrospective in Chicago, noir westerns such as Robert Wise's Blood on the Moon and Budd Boetticher's The Tall T in San Francisco and films by Gregory J. Markopoulos in Los Angeles. » - David Hudson
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

Daily | Goings On | Afrofuturism, Wiseman, Noir Westerns

Ashley Clark, who's curated Space Is the Place: Afrofuturism on Film, the series that opened at New York's BAMcinématek yesterday and runs through April 15, picks out a few highlights for the Guardian, including John Coney's Space Is the Place with Sun Ra, Ngozi Onwurah's Welcome II the Terrordome, John Akomfrah's The Last Angel of History and Terence Nance's An Oversimplification of Her Beauty. Also, more on Walerian Borowczyk, an overview of the career of producer and director James B. Harris, a major Frederick Wiseman retrospective in Chicago, noir westerns such as Robert Wise's Blood on the Moon and Budd Boetticher's The Tall T in San Francisco and films by Gregory J. Markopoulos in Los Angeles. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Raising Cain: The work of James M. Cain

Hammett, Chandler, Cain: the modern mystery thriller starts with them. They are the godfathers of that sensibility that would come to be called noir which would, in time, overflow the printed page and onto the stage, the big screen, and eventually even to television. Identified primarily with mysteries, the concept of flawed human beings ethically tripping and stumbling in a moral No Man’s Land, equidistant between Right and Wrong, Good and Bad would bleed across genre lines. There would be noir Westerns (Blood on the Moon, 1948), noir war movies (Attack!, 1956), noir horror (The Body Snatcher, 1945), even noir melodramas like Cain’s own Mildred Pierce, adapted for the screen in 1945.

But they all started with what Hammett, Chandler, and Cain did on the page, and each provided an evolutionary step which took what had once been usually dismissed as a flyweight genre dedicated to colorful private investigators and clever puzzles,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Phyllis Thaxter obituary

Hollywood actor known for playing wholesome wives and Ma Kent in Superman

Although Phyllis Thaxter, who has died aged 92, had a successful career in films throughout the 1940s and 50s, many will remember her for her last movie role, in Superman (1978). It was the small but key part of Ma Kent, the childless farmer's wife who adopts a foundling baby and names him Clark. Together with her husband (Glenn Ford) – both made intentionally to resemble the couple in Grant Wood's American Gothic painting – they bring up the abnormally physically gifted boy until he's ready to fly off "to fight for truth, justice and the American way".

At one stage, she tells him: "We Kents don't like show-offs, ain't that so? A body's got to be humble even if he knows that he's better'n his neighbours." A fragile beauty, Thaxter was never a show-off, but made an impact in a gentle way,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Book Review: Seagalogy – The Ass-Kicking Films of Steven Seagal (Updated Ed.)

Seagalogy: The Ass-kicking Films Of Steven Seagal

Written by Vern | Published by Titan Books | Format: Paperback, 512pp

Ain’t It Cool News’ Vern is back once again with an updated version of his essential book Seagalogy, an in-depth study of the films of the world’s only aikido instructor turned actor, director, writer, blues guitarist and police man, the ass-kicking spiritualist Steven Seagal. Originally released in 2008, this new updated version includes 11 new chapters and tons of brand new material including Vern’s hilarious deconstruction of Seagal’s appearance in the Robert Rodriguez movie Machete, and coverage of Seagal’s own hit reality TV show, Lawman. In all the book contains 38 chapters, starting with 1988′s Above the Law (aka Nico) right up to the DVD release of the third volume of his new TV series True Justice. In all that’s massive 512 pages of pure Seagalism!

Some might say that a
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Worth Remembering: Robert Mitchum (1917-1997) – “Baby I Don’t Care”

The title of Lee Server’s acclaimed 2002 biography, Robert Mitchum: Baby I Don’t Care (MacMillan), offers a perfect encapsulization of the eponymous actor: a hard-partying Hollywood Bad Boy who didn’t give a damn what moralizing finger-waggers thought of him, or what his peers in the movie business thought, or the press, or even the public. He was going to go his own way and to hell with you, and anyone positioning themselves to make strong objection was just as likely to get a punch in the nose as shown the actor’s broad back. He worked hardest at conveying the idea that the thing he did for a living – acting – was also the thing he cared least about; an impression that may have been his most convincing performance.

The Bad Boy part of Mitchum’s reputation was honestly come by. As a youth, he’d been booted from more than one school,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

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