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News for
"The Ed Sullivan Show" (1948) More at IMDbPro »"Toast of the Town" (original title)


2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2004

1-20 of 23 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Bruce Springsteen Talks Elvis, Beatles And Trump On Stephen Colbert’s ‘Late Show’

24 September 2016 7:50 AM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

Bruce Springsteen visited The Late Show with Stephen Colbert to reminisce about being inspired to pick up a guitar by performances of Elvis and The Beatles on The Ed Sullivan Show, in the very theater where Colbert’s show is broadcast. The rocker also credited his Catholic upbringing with influencing his work, and picked his Top 5 Springsteen songs. Colbert interviewed “the master American troubadour of my lifetime” across all four segments of his show, coinciding with… »

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Film Review: History & Pure Fun in ‘The Beatles: Eight Days a Week - The Touring Years’

20 September 2016 8:32 AM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – They were the greatest show on earth, for what it was worth. But what they also were was one of the most fascinating show business stories in history. Director Ron Howard encapsulates John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr during their initial meteoric rise in the descriptively titled ‘The Beatles: Eight Days a Week - The Touring Years.’

Rating: 5.0/5.0

The Beatles history, in ten short years, continues to intrigue and delight rock music scholars and admirers. Ron Howard does a spectacular job of focusing on three crucial years, the years that The Beatles were a traveling road show. Beginning with their conquering of America in February of 1964, through their last organized live concert in San Francisco on August 29th, 1966, the four boys in the band became men, and faced a tsunami of adoration, backlash, surreality and collective joy. This is a love fest by Ron Howard, dedicated »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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The Beatles: Eight Days a Week review – moptops conquer the world

15 September 2016 7:30 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Ron Howard trashes the idea that there’s nothing new to say about the Beatles with a revealing survey of the four-year odyssey that changed everything

Blink and you’ll miss it, but Ron Howard’s intensely enjoyable documentary about the Beatles’ touring years has a great surreal moment at the very beginning. The moptops are getting out of the plane in New York, on their way to a date with destiny on The Ed Sullivan Show, and the newsreel camera briefly catches a couple of placards held up in the huge airport crowd. “Beatles Unfair 2 Bald Men” reads one, and another says: “England Get Out of Ireland.” The images vanish, and their atypical sentiments are in any case drowned by the global scream of unironic adulation. Yet both echo other undercurrents in Beatlemania: a fear of these weirdly attractive aliens, a hatred of youth culture and youth itself, and »

- Peter Bradshaw

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'The Beatles: Eight Days a Week' Review: The Fab Four on Tour

15 September 2016 5:00 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

No, there's nothing particularly revelatory here. But director Ron Howard, who put together the 2013 Jay-z concert pic Made in America, catches the exhilarating kick of Beatlemania as the band toured 15 countries from 1963 to 1966. Everything is here, from the band's hysteria-making American television debut on The Ed Sullivan Show to Lennon's controversial remark that the Beatles "are more popular than Jesus." Paul McCartney provides context: "By the end, it became quite complicated. But at the beginning, things were really simple." True, that.

In fresh interviews, McCartney and Ringo Starr offer comments »

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The Beatles: Eight Days a Week – The Touring Years documentary review: yeah yeah yeah

15 September 2016 4:44 AM, PDT | www.flickfilosopher.com | See recent FlickFilosopher news »

MaryAnn’s quick take…

There’s not a lot new here, but the vintage footage is fab, as is the much-needed reminder that the supposedly innocent past was hardly innocent at all. I’m “biast” (pro): love the Beatles’s music (who doesn’t?)

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

The band you know,” goes the tagline for The Beatles: Eight Days a Week – The Touring Years, “the story you don’t.” Can that really be true? The Beatles have not authorized a feature-length documentary like this one since they broke up in 1970, but surely everyone knows pretty much everything about the bestsellingest band of all time, the band that kickstarted the cultural revolution of the 1960s and helped create a truly global pop culture. Don’t they? Everyone’s seen A Hard Day’s Night, right? I mean, I »

- MaryAnn Johanson

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New clip from The Beatles: Eight Days a Week – The Touring Years

13 September 2016 10:40 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

With its world premiere taking place in Leicester Square tomorrow, StudioCanal has released a new clip from Ron Howard’s documentary The Beastles: Eight Days a Week – The Touring Years, which sees the Fab Four arriving in America. Take a look…

See Also: Watch the trailer for The Beatles: Eight Days a Week – The Touring Years

After their now-legendary North American debut on “The Ed Sullivan Show” in 1964, The Beatles transfixed the U.S. and the tremors were felt worldwide, transforming music and pop culture forever with their records and television appearances. The Beatles’ extraordinary musicianship and charisma also made them one of the greatest live bands of all time. In The Beatles: Eight Days a Week – The Touring Years, Oscar®-winning director Ron Howard (A Beautiful Mind, Apollo 13) explores the history of The Beatles through the lens of the group’s concert performances, from their early days playing »

- Gary Collinson

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Win movie merchandise with The Beatles: Eight Days a Week – The Touring Years

10 September 2016 2:45 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

To celebrate the release of The Beatles: Eight Days A Week – The Touring Years – only in cinemas September 15th, we’re giving away five limited edition official branded merchandise sets featuring t-shirt, tote bag, mug and a poster! After their now-legendary North American debut on “The Ed Sullivan Show” in 1964, The Beatles transfixed the U.S. and […]

The post Win movie merchandise with The Beatles: Eight Days a Week – The Touring Years appeared first on HeyUGuys. »

- Competitions

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First clip from The Beatles: Eight Days a Week – The Touring Years

7 September 2016 6:21 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Ahead of its UK theatrical release next Friday, we’ve got the first clip from Ron Howard’s new documentary The Beatles: Eight Days a Week – The Touring Years, which sees the Fab Four reflecting on their gig at Shea Stadium; check it out here…

See Also: Watch the trailer for The Beatles: Eight Days a Week – The Touring Years

After their now-legendary North American debut on “The Ed Sullivan Show” in 1964, The Beatles transfixed the U.S. and the tremors were felt worldwide, transforming music and pop culture forever with their records and television appearances. The Beatles’ extraordinary musicianship and charisma also made them one of the greatest live bands of all time. In The Beatles: Eight Days a Week – The Touring Years, Oscar®-winning director Ron Howard (A Beautiful Mind, Apollo 13) explores the history of The Beatles through the lens of the group’s concert performances, from »

- Gary Collinson

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10 years ago today: ‘Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby’ opened in theaters

4 August 2016 8:30 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

One decade ago today, we first learned the story of American hero Ricky Bobby. Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby opened in theaters 10 years ago today. Audiences came out in droves that weekend for the comedy starring Will Ferrell as a winning-obsessed Nascar driver. Behind The Lego Movie, Talladega Nights remains Ferrell’s second largest movie opening.  The movie reunited Ferrell with his Anchorman director Adam McKay. The two of them, along with John C. Reilly (who plays Ricky Bobby’s teammate Cal Naughton Jr. in Talladega Nights) would soon team up again for Step Brothers. Other notable August 4 happenings in pop culture history: • 1942: Bing Crosby-Fred Astaire film Holiday Inn premiered in New York. Crosby song “White Christmas” is featured in the movie musical. • 1957: The Everly Brothers made their second appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show. They introduced their upcoming single, “Wake Up Little Susie »

- Emily Rome

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Red-Carpet Exclusive Portraits: Woody Allen for ‘Café Society’

25 July 2016 8:51 PM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – He is one of the most prolific American directors of the modern cinema era, and has also forged a career as stand-up comedian, actor, playwright and screenplay artist. He is Woody Allen, and he walked the Red Carpet at the Chicago History Museum on July 21st, 2016, for his new film ‘Café Society.’

The film is his 47th feature film as writer/director, from “What’s Up, Tiger Lily” (1966) to the present day, and highlights Allen’s strengths as an artist. “Café Society” is filled with romance, heartbreak and the glamour of 1930s Hollywood, and features Steve Carrell, Jesse Eisenberg, Kristen Stewart, Blake Lively, Corey Stoll and Parker Posey. It is schedule for nationwide release on July 29th, 2016

Woody Allen’s Latest Film is ‘Café Society, Releasing Nationwide on July 29th, 2016

Photo credit: Joe Arce of Starstruck Foto for HollywoodChicago.com

Woody Allen was born Allen Stewart Konigsberg in Brooklyn, »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Marni Nixon, Voice Behind Stars in Movie Musicals Like ‘My Fair Lady,’ Dies at 86

25 July 2016 8:51 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Marni Nixon, who gained fame as a “ghost singer” for Deborah Kerr in “The King and I,” Natalie Wood in “West Side Story” and Audrey Hepburn in “My Fair Lady,” died of breast cancer on Sunday in New York City. She was 86.

In the 1940s, ’50s and into the ’60s, major film actresses without great singing voices were often “dubbed” by anonymous background singers. Studio execs preferred to keep alive the myth that the stars did their own singing. Nixon became the most famous of these — inadvertently at first, because Kerr spilled the beans in an interview about “The King and I” in 1956.

She was born Feb. 22, 1930, in Altadena, Calif. By the time she was 4, her family discovered that she had the rare gift of “perfect pitch” and started her on violin lessons.

By the time she was 7, she was working as an extra or bit player in films, which continued through her teen years. »

- Jon Burlingame

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Yumi Ito – One of the Twin Fairies Who Sang to Mothra Dead at 75

16 July 2016 5:25 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Kaiju fans are in mourning today. Yumi Ito may not be a household name but anyone who grew up watching the Godzilla movies on television remembers the two magical fairies who would sing those lovely lullabies to Mothra, the giant moth. The identical twins were perhaps the most memorable human characters in the Godzilla series, and Emi and Yumi Ito were the two actresses who played the roles. They recorded hit albums in Japan going by the name “The Peanuts” and were one of that country’s first pop sensations, one of the few that became well known internationally.

The sisters Emi and Yumi Ito, were born Hideyo and Tsukiko Ito on April 1, 1941 in Aichi prefecture. They were discovered by Watanabe Pro founder Sho Watanabe, a music impresario who first saw them performing at a club in Nagoya as the Ito Sisters. In 1958 brought them to Tokyo, where they were dubbed The Peanuts. »

- Tom Stockman

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30 years ago today: ‘Karate Kid II’ showed us the Glory of Love

20 June 2016 6:00 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

30 years ago today, audiences were treated again to the utterly watchable pair of Daniel and Mr. Miyagi. The Karate Kid, Part II opened in theaters on June 20, 1986. In the sequel, released two years after the original film, Daniel’s wax on, wax off early training days are behind him, and he’s impressively slicing through six blocks of ice. The boy and his mentor travel together to Mr. Miyagi’s home village in Okinawa, Japan. Sparks fly between Daniel and Kumiko, the niece of Mr. Miyagi’s childhood girlfriend, to the synthesizer-tastic tune of “Glory of Love” by Peter Cetera. The song hit the top of the Billboard Hot 100 later that summer and got an Oscar nomination for Best Original Song. Other notable June 20 happenings in pop culture history: • 1948: The Ed Sullivan Show — then titled Toast of the Town — premiered on CBS. Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis performed in that first episode, »

- Emily Rome

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On this day in pop culture history: Pixar’s ‘Cars’ opened in theaters

9 June 2016 9:00 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

It’s been 10 years since audiences first got to see Mater and Lightning McQueen on the big screen. Pixar’s Cars opened in theaters on June 9, 2006, following its world premiere at Lowe’s Motor Speedway in Concord, Nc. The seventh feature from the Emeryville, CA-based animation studio, it returned John Lasseter to the director’s chair. Cars failed to reach the box office grosses of the three other Pixar movies released before it in the new millennium — Monsters, Inc., Finding Nemo and The Incredibles — but, unsurprisingly, merchandise sales were huge for this one. A sequel was released in 2011, and Cars 3 is set for a June 2017 release. Other notable June 9 happenings in pop culture history: • 1950: British noir film Night and the City had its U.S. premiere. • 1963: Barbra Streisand appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show for the third time. • 1984: Cyndi Lauper’s “Time After Time” hit the top of the Billboard singles chart. »

- Emily Rome

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On this day in pop culture history: Michael J. Fox said goodbye to ‘Spin City’

24 May 2016 6:00 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

16 years ago today, Mike Flaherty bid adieu to City Hall and Michael J. Fox said goodbye to Spin City. It was the actor’s final episode as a regular on the ABC sitcom after playing the lead role since the show premiered in 1996. Fox had revealed to the public in 1998 his battle with Parkinson’s disease. As his symptoms worsened, during Spin City’s fourth season, Fox, then 38 years old, announced he would be leaving the show at the end of the season to spend more time with his family and to raise money for Parkinson's research and awareness. Spin City lasted another two seasons after Fox’s departure, with Charlie Sheen as the new lead. Fox did return for appearances in a few episodes in the final season. In that May 24, 2000 episode, the season 4 finale, Mike Flaherty fired himself to save everyone else on the mayor’s staff in the midst of a scandal, »

- Emily Rome

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Peabody Awards Live Blog: ‘Mr. Robot,’ ‘Black-ish,’ ‘Transparent,’ David Letterman Receive Honors

21 May 2016 4:12 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

The 75th annual Peabody Awards are underway in New York, with stars and showrunners of “Mr. Robot,” “Unreal,” “Transparent,” “Marvel’s Jessica Jones” and other programs on hand to accept their kudos. David Letterman and Jon Stewart are also in the house to receive special achievement honors.

Follow Variety‘s live coverage from Cipriani Wall Street here as the winners take the stage.

7:14 p.m.: Host Keagan-Michael Key takes the stage following a goofy video featuring him consulting Fred Armisen and Stephen Colbert on hosting the ceremony.

7:17: Key notes the high level of diversity among the honorees. He calls out Jada Pinkett-Smith as being in the crowd, noting her vocal protest regarding the Oscar nominees this year. When he’s told that she’s not here, he exclaims: “This would have been the one for Jada to come to!”

7:24: Jill Soloway accepts for “Transparent. »

- Cynthia Littleton

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Entertainment News: Film, TV Star & Oscar Winner Patty Duke Dies at 69

29 March 2016 12:47 PM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Coeur D’Alene, Idaho – She was a lesson in duality. One of her most famous roles was as “identical cousins” on “The Patty Duke Show,” and Anna Marie “Patty” Duke also made public her fight with bipolar disorder. She was also a talented actress, winning an Oscar as teenager for “The Miracle Worker.” Ms. Duke passed away on March 29th, 2016, at the age of 69, at her home in Idaho.

Anna Marie Duke (her friends call her “Anna”) became Patty Duke when she was only eight years old. She went on to fame in the role of Helen Keller in the original 1959-61 Broadway run of “The Miracle Worker,” co-starring Anne Bancroft as Annie Sullivan. The film version (1962) garnered Duke the Best Supporting Actress Oscar, the youngest to ever win at the time at age 16. The next year she starred in “The Patty Duke Show,” with its familiar theme song beginning »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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20 years ago today: Ewan McGregor’s ‘Trainspotting’ opened in theaters

23 February 2016 7:00 AM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

20 years ago today, Trainspotting began winning over audiences on its way to becoming a breakout British hit. The film, about drug addiction in Edinburgh, was released in the U.K. and Ireland on this day in 1996, and a U.S. release followed that summer. The film launched Ewan McGregor into international stardom — he was cast in the Star Wars prequels shortly afterward. Trainspotting was his second team-up with director Danny Boyle, following Boyle’s feature debut, Shallow Grave. Boyle went on to earn Oscar attention for Slumdog Millionaire and 127 Hours. Diane, the teenager McGregor’s character becomes entangled with, was played by Kelly Macdonald, who turned 20 on the day of Trainspotting’s U.K./Ireland release. Boyle is currently working on a Trainspotting sequel that he plans to shoot later this year. Other notable February 23 happenings in pop culture history: • 1939: At the 11th Academy Awards, Frank Capra film You »

- Emily Rome

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5 years ago today: We said goodbye to ‘Friday Night Lights’

9 February 2016 8:00 AM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

“Clear eyes. Full hearts. Can’t Lose.” It was five years ago today that Friday Night Lights fans said goodbye to Coach Taylor, Tami, Julie, Matt, Riggins, and the rest of the residents of Dillion, TX they had grown to love. On February 9, 2011 the series finale aired on DirecTV’s 101 Network. A re-broadcast of the fifth and final season aired a few months later on NBC (where the show debuted in 2006). NBC had cut that deal with DirecTV for the final three seasons of the show because it never gained a large audience. But it was hailed by critics and had a strong devotion from its small following. Celebrating 10 years since Fnl’s premiere, some cast members of the show are set for a reunion at Atx Fest this June. Other notable February 9 happenings in pop culture history: • 1953: The Adventures of Superman first aired in Los Angeles (a syndicated »

- Emily Rome

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Bob Elliott, Half of Comedy Duo Bob and Ray, Dies at 92

3 February 2016 12:16 PM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Bob Elliott, half of the famed radio and television comedy team of Bob and Ray, died Tuesday from throat cancer, the New York Times reports. He was 92.

Elliott and his comedy partner Ray Goulding performed unique skits, as they took turns playing the jokester or straight man, while most comedy duos had one permanent person for each role. Soft-spoken Elliot and rambunctious Ray hosted the TV sketch show “The Bob and Ray Show” from 1951-1953.

The duo recorded comedy albums and frequently appeared on “The Tonight Show” and “The Ed Sullivan Show,” and were seen in Norman Lear’s “Cold Turkey” and Arthur Hiller’s “Author! Author!” Staring in 1970, they starred in “Bob and Ray: The Two and Only” on Broadway.

“I like jokes, but Ray and I, we never did jokes,” Elliott said in a 2011 interview with the Archive of American Television. “We weren’t in that line of humor. »

- Margaret Lenker

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2004

1-20 of 23 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


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