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Perry Como's Kraft Music Hall (TV Series 1948–1967) Poster

Trivia

Perry Como gave early support and TV exposure on his show to black performers like The Ravens and Nat 'King' Cole.
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Debuted on Christmas Eve, 1948 on NBC. Switched to CBS in October 1950 but would revert back to NBC in September 1955 until its final weekly broadcast on 12 June 1963. From time to time the show would return still bearing the title "The Perry Como Show", but, like the "Hallmark Hall of Fame", not as a weekly series. Perry remained quite popular and would continue doing irregular specials through 1966 along with his ubiquitous Christmas shows.
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Shown as a 15-minute show until June 1949 on NBC. Expanded to a 30-minute format on NBC after its return from summer hiatus but reverted to a 15-minute show when it moved over to CBS in October 1950 until June 1955. After another summer hiatus and a move back to NBC, it expanded to a full hour until it ended its weekly run in June 1963. Kraft Foods assumed sponsorship from Chesterfield Cigarettes in 1961.
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All New York City television networks' contracts with the United Scenic Artist's Union IATSE # 829 designated that the production's designer credit clause be stipulated that a television (stage) scenic designer credit could only be designated as a "Scenic Designer" - not "Art Director". On the west coast, the networks did not have this agreement with any union contract, specifically, The Society of Motion Picture and Television Art Directors - IATSE #876 Union. (Changed to The Art Directors Guild IATSE #800). The NYC networks had a contract with the graphic artists' union designating employed graphic artists and affiliated associates be given the credit "Art Directors." This television irony is the reason scenic designers could not have nor redeem the "art director" title for a credit title. With production for television specials being produced by both independent sponsors and producers, the "art director credit" used on a New York based television program's credit list prevented the network's monopolized "art director-graphic artist" credit denied to the stage scenic designer performing theatrical set design duties.
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