IMDb > The Woman on the Beach (1947)
The Woman on the Beach
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

The Woman on the Beach (1947) More at IMDbPro »

Photos (See all 2 | slideshow)

Overview

User Rating:
6.7/10   939 votes »
Your Rating:
Saving vote...
Deleting vote...
/10   (delete | history)
Sorry, there was a problem
MOVIEmeter: ?
Up 19% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Frank Davis (screenplay) and
Jean Renoir (screenplay) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for The Woman on the Beach on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
2 June 1947 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Go ahead and say it...I'm no good!
Plot:
A Coast Guardsman suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress becomes involved with a beautiful and enigmatic seductress married to a blind painter. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
User Reviews:
"Go ahead and say it... I'm no good" See more (27 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Joan Bennett ... Peggy

Robert Ryan ... Scott

Charles Bickford ... Tod
Nan Leslie ... Eve
Walter Sande ... Otto Wernecke

Irene Ryan ... Mrs. Wernecke
Glen Vernon ... Kirk (as Glenn Vernon)
Frank Darien ... Lars
Jay Norris ... Jimmy
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Robert Anderson ... Coast Guardsman (uncredited)
Carl Armstrong ... Lenny (uncredited)
Bonnie Blair ... Girl at Party (uncredited)
Hugh Chapman ... Young Fisherman (uncredited)
Kay Christopher ... Girl at Party (uncredited)
Maria Dodd ... Nurse Jennings (uncredited)
Carol Donell ... Girl at Party (uncredited)
John Elliott ... Old Workman (uncredited)
Carl Faulkner ... Old Fisherman (uncredited)
Donald Gordon ... Donnie (uncredited)
Harry Harvey ... Dr. Smith (uncredited)

Martha Hyer ... Mrs. Barton (uncredited)
Jackie Jackson ... Johnnie (uncredited)
Drew Miller ... Coast Guardsman (uncredited)
Nancy Saunders ... Girl at Party (uncredited)
Robert Seiter ... Coast Guardsman (uncredited)
Bill Shannon ... Blacksmith (uncredited)
Create a character page for: ?

Directed by
Jean Renoir 
 
Writing credits
Frank Davis (screenplay) and
Jean Renoir (screenplay)

J.R. Michael Hogan (adaptation) (as Michael Hogan)

Mitchell Wilson (novel "None So Blind")

Produced by
Jack J. Gross .... executive producer
Will Price .... associate producer
 
Original Music by
Hanns Eisler 
 
Cinematography by
Leo Tover (director of photography)
Harry J. Wild (director of photography) (as Harry Wild)
 
Film Editing by
Lyle Boyer 
Roland Gross 
 
Art Direction by
Albert S. D'Agostino 
Walter E. Keller 
 
Set Decoration by
Darrell Silvera 
John Sturtevant 
 
Costume Design by
Edward Stevenson (gowns)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
James E. Casey .... assistant director (as James Casey)
John Pommer .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Clem Portman .... sound
Jean L. Speak .... sound
 
Special Effects by
Russell A. Cully .... special effects
 
Editorial Department
Harold Palmer .... montage
 
Music Department
C. Bakaleinikoff .... musical director
Gil Grau .... orchestrator
 
Other crew
Charles H. Gardiner .... technical advisor (as Lt. Cmdr. Charles H. Gardiner)
Paula Walling .... dialogue director
Leonard Shannon .... unit publicity writer (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies
Create a character page for: ?

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
71 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Certification:
Finland:K-12 (1971) | Finland:K-16 (1948) | Iceland:L | USA:Approved (PCA #11450, Adult Audience)

Did You Know?

Goofs:
Factual errors: Peggy says her husband's "optic nerve was cut," which is why he's blind. But although she refers to the optic nerve in the singular, people have two optic nerves, one for each eye.See more »
Quotes:
Tod:Peggy, did it ever occur to you that to me you'll always be beautiful no matter how old you grow? I'll always remember you as you were the last day I saw you - young, beautiful, bright, excitimg. No one who can see can say that to you. Peg, you're so beautiful... so beautiful outside... so rotten inside.See more »
Movie Connections:
Featured in Val Lewton: The Man in the Shadows (2007) (TV)See more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
6 out of 8 people found the following review useful.
"Go ahead and say it... I'm no good", 28 December 2008
Author: ackstasis from Australia

By 1947, Jean Renoir, at least indirectly, wasn't new to the American film noir style. Two years earlier, Fritz Lang had released the first of his two Renoir remakes, 'Scarlet Street (1945),' which was based upon 'La Chienne / The Bitch (1931)' {the second film, 'Human Desire (1954),' was inspired by 'La Bête humaine (1938)'}. 'Scarlet Street' notably starred Joan Bennett in a prominent role, which makes it interesting that, despite allegedly disliking that film, Renoir himself used her in his own Hollywood film noir, 'The Woman on the Beach (1947).' It's a visually-magnificent film, with photography from Leo Tover and Harry Wild (the latter of whom shot 'Murder, My Sweet (1944)' and 'Macao (1952)') that perfectly captures the mystery and eerie calm of the beach-side setting, frequently swathed in gentle clouds of mist that foreshadow the ambiguity and uncertainty of the story that follows. When we first glimpse Joan Bennett on the fog-swathed coast, collecting driftwood at the wreck of a grounded ship, she really does look ghostly and ethereal, a premonition that may or may not be real.

Robert Ryan plays Scott, a coastguard who suffers from regular night terrors concerning memories of a war-time naval tragedy, when his ship was presumably torpedoed. His dream sequences are gripping and otherwordly, recalling the excellently surreal work achieved by Renoir in his silent short film, 'The Little Match Girl (1928).' During his nightmares, Scott imagines an underwater romantic liaison, which, before he can get intimate, unexpectedly blows up in his face; this is an apt indication of the events that unfold later in the film. Scott is engaged to marry the pretty Eve (Nan Leslie), but his attention is soon distracted by Peggy (Joan Bennett), the titular "woman on the beach." Peggy is married to Tod (Charles Bickford), a famous blind artist who is still coming to terms with his relatively recent affliction. At just 71 minutes in length, 'Woman on the Beach' feels far too short, the apparent victim of studio interference. Scott is obviously enamoured, and later obsessed, with femme fatale Peggy, in a manner than suggests Walter Neff's fixation with Phyllis Dietrichson, but the motivations behind his actions are inadequately explored and explained.

Perhaps as a result of the studio's trimming of scenes, many plot-twists in the film seem somewhat contrived. Scott's extreme determination in proving that Tod is faking blindness feels so incredibly illogical – why, indeed, would Tod even consider such a con? Many wonderful scenes are severely hampered by the story's lack of exposition. In the film's most dramatic scene, amid the choppy waters of the Atlantic, Robert Ryan displays a frighteningly convincing rage that borders on pure psychosis, a quality that Nicholas Ray exploited five years later in 'On Dangerous Ground (1952).' However, because Scott's obsession and emotional transformation had previously been explored so sparsely, the sequence feels, above all else, out of context. The performances are nevertheless solid across the board, with Bickford probably the most impressive. Bennett's character is tantalisingly ambiguous: throughout the film, she slowly reveals herself to be nothing but a greedy tramp, though Scott insists on treating her as a tormented victim of abuse. The ending offers little in the way of resolution, reaffirming the sentiment that perhaps this film isn't all there.

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (27 total) »

Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for The Woman on the Beach (1947)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
It will play on TCM at 8:45 AM (EDT) on Wednesday, 4/10/2013. michaelhelwick
Where can I find it???? worldofgabby
NEW DVD RELEASE: WARNER ARCHIVE 21/6/11 bjnevin
the ambiguous endding sleepybone
See more »

Recommendations

If you enjoyed this title, our database also recommends:
- - - - -
The Ghost and Mrs. Muir I Dreamed of Africa Greed Shutter Island Ray
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
Show more recommendations

Related Links

Full cast and crew Company credits External reviews
News articles IMDb Drama section IMDb USA section

You may report errors and omissions on this page to the IMDb database managers. They will be examined and if approved will be included in a future update. Clicking the 'Edit page' button will take you through a step-by-step process.