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Out of the Past (1947) Poster

Trivia

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Robert Mitchum told Roger Ebert he smoked so much that when the camera was rolling and Kirk Douglas offered him a pack and asked, "Cigarette?", Mitchum, realizing he'd carried a cigarette into the scene, held up his fingers and replied, "Smoking." His improvisation saved the take and they kept it in the movie.
Jane Greer recalled that the laconic Robert Mitchum projected an equally cavalier attitude off camera. She got the impression that he came to the set unprepared, in order to give a more spontaneous performance. She explained, "I remember him saying 'What are the lyrics?' to the script person. 'I never know the lyrics,' he'd say, and she would give him the lines. I said, 'You don't learn your lines beforehand?' and he'd said, 'Naah.' Gosh, I learned mine a week ahead of time. I thought that might be part of why he seemed so much more spontaneous, why he was so easy and underplayed. I decided I'd do that, not be letter perfect. So I tried learning my lines under the dryer in the morning. I hoped I'd look as though I was thinking. But I blew take after take, and he was letter perfect. Well, I figured out later that, of course, he knew the lines."
After Humphrey Bogart refused the lead it was offered to John Garfield and then Dick Powell, both of whom turned it down. Robert Mitchum was fourth choice.
Humphrey Bogart read the script and, seeing the similarities between this and The Maltese Falcon (1941), wanted to play Jeff. However, Warner Bros. didn't buy the material and RKO produced this movie.
By all accounts, it was obvious that an undeniable tension developed between Kirk Douglas and Robert Mitchum early on during the filming. Certainly the acting styles of the two men could not have been more different. Mitchum's relaxed, laconic manner contrasted with the aggressive, grandstanding Douglas. In the first scenes to be shot with the two actors, Douglas attempted some scene stealing by manipulating distracting props, such as swinging a key chain or flipping a coin, George Raft style. Jacques Tourneur saw through these ploys and put a stop to them. For his part, Mitchum would retaliate by making faces when the camera was behind his head, so as to throw off Douglas' reaction shots. Eventually the one-upmanship faded, and the two let their natural styles compliment each other.
On November 14, 1987, Robert Mitchum was the guest host on Saturday Night Live (1975), broadcast from the NBC Studios at 30 Rockefeller Plaza in New York. One of the sketches he participated in was a black-and-white spoof of the film called "Out of Gas." The sketch featured an unbilled guest appearance by none other than Jane Greer.
In terms of developing her character, Jane Greer got helpful but minimal direction from Jacques Tourneur. "Zzjjane, do you know what ahm-pahs-eeve mean?" he asked the actress. "Impassive? Yes". "No 'big eyes', no expressive. In the beginning you act like a nice girl. But then, after you kill the man you meet in the little house, you become a bad girl. Yes? First half, good girl. Second half, bad." "I get you," she said. That was his direction, Greer recalled. "But I did throw in a few big eyes anyway. I couldn't help myself." Tourneur also discussed with her his plan for the character's wardrobe, something typical of his films' subtle, insidious visual design. "At first you wear light colors. After you kill the man, darker colors. In the end, black."
Jane Greer took notice of the differing personalities and styles of her leading men. She found that Robert Mitchum was protective on the set. She said that he "was just terrific to me and just took care of me. Even the way I looked. One costume I wore was a little too large--Bob was the one who noticed it was bulging around the waist. So he stopped everything, borrowed a pin from the wardrobe lady and gathered it in and pinned me up in the back". On the other hand, Greer said, "Kirk Douglas is a more physical actor. He bruised my arms grabbing me, and my face was roundly slapped. How he did Champion (1949) without maiming his partner is a miracle".
When asked in later years about the confusing storyline, Robert Mitchum's standard response was that "two or three pages were lost in the mimeo department."
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Filming got off to a rocky start with a near-fatal plane accident at the Bridgeport (CA) airport landing field. The pilot, accompanied by Robert Mitchum, a studio accountant and an assistant to executive Walter Duff, realized his brakes didn't work when they touched down, causing the plane to crash through a fence, over a ditch and through an outhouse before coming to a stop. Although the two men in the back seat were knocked unconscious, Mitchum and the pilot were not hurt. Typical of Mitchum's nonchalant attitude, he quickly crawled out of the wreckage, dusted off his clothes and thumbed a ride into town to begin filming.
Although in later years the film was often viewed as the teaming of two major stars, at the time Kirk Douglas was virtually unknown.
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Jane Greer's first scene in the movie with Robert Mitchum was the famous kissing scene on the beach. She remembered shooting the scene, "I'm looking at Bob and I see he has something on his mouth and it looked funny. Finally I got courage enough to say, 'Excuse me, Bob, but they've done something with your makeup; I think they messed it up. Your lips, that brown lip liner, or whatever it is, is smeared." Mitchum said, "What are you talking about?" He yelled for the makeup man. "They bring him a mirror," said Greer, "he takes a look into the mirror, and he says, "Oh, honey, that's just chawin' tabbacky." Bob wiped his mouth with the back of his hand and resumed kissing position. Greer thought, "Well, this movie is going to be different."
Robert Mitchum and Jane Greer were teamed again for the RKO noir film The Big Steal (1949). While at first glance it might seem like a natural follow-up to the success of this film, Mitchum and Greer were paired up again only after very trying circumstances. Originally Lizabeth Scott, on loan from Paramount and Hal B. Wallis, was to star opposite Mitchum in the film, which had been set to start production in October of 1948. On August 31, however, Mitchum was arrested in Los Angeles on marijuana possession charges. Howard Hughes had acquired RKO just a month prior and decided to rush production and start shooting The Big Steal (1949) as soon as Mitchum was out on bail. Then Scott dropped out of the film, so Greer was brought in only at the last minute. Later, production on the film was halted for two months as Mitchum served his sentence. Daniel Mainwaring worked on the script for the film, which was directed by Don Siegel.
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This film was selected to the National Film Registry, Library of Congress, in 1991.
Dickie Moore plays "The Kid", despite barely being younger than the main actresses in the movie. For instance, there is only one year between him and leading lady Jane Greer, and less than five months between him and Virginia Huston.
As a result of the film's success, Jacques Tourneur was given a new term contract by RKO in April 1947.
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This was the final collaboration between Jacques Tourneur and director of photography Nicholas Musuraca, who worked together on such films as Cat People (1942).
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The film is included on Roger Ebert's "Great Movies" list.
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The story takes place in Bridgeport, CA. Robert Mitchum was born in Bridgeport, CT.
Although RKO had focused on making more lucrative "B" pictures during the early 1940s, this was given an "A" budget.
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Released in the UK as "Build My Gallows High".
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RKO borrowed Kirk Douglas from Paramount for the picture.
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Included among the American Film Institute's 1998 list of the 400 movies nominated for the Top 100 Greatest American Movies.
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One of the memorable lines of the film, "Baby, I don't care," was used by author Lee Server as the title of his 2001 biography of Robert Mitchum.
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In the mid-1970s producer Jerry Bick, who had already produced the neo-noir films The Long Goodbye (1973) and Farewell, My Lovely (1975) starring Robert Mitchum as Philip Marlowe, announced plans for a new adaptation of "Build My Gallows High". He had a screenplay and a director lined up, but the project fell through.
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Two lines from this film ("Do you wanna talk business or do you wanna play house" and "I'm tired of gettin' pushed around") were sampled in an early house music track entitled "Tired of Getting Pushed Around." It was the only song released by 2 Men, a Drum Machine and a Trumpet, which was comprised of two of the three members of the band Fine Young Cannibals (who took their name from the film All the Fine Young Cannibals (1960)).
Edward Dmytryk was the original director, but dropped out due to scheduling conflicts with So Well Remembered (1947).
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The movie was remade as Against All Odds (1984). In the remake, Jane Greer plays the mother of her character in this film, the woman who flees to Mexico with her employer's money (played by Rachel Ward).
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Included among the "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die", edited by Steven Schneider.
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In November 1945 J. Robert Bren was announced as producer, although Warren Duff, who is credited on screen in that capacity, had already been slated to produce.
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French visa # 7991.
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Lex Barker was tested for the role in the production.
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Spoilers 

The trivia item below may give away important plot points.

PCA director Joseph I. Breen rejected early drafts of the script in which "Kathie" is shown living with both "Whit" and "Jeff" without benefit of marriage. Noting in a June 12, 1946, letter that "such a brazen portrayal of gross illicit sex is in violation of the Code," Breen strongly recommended that the novel not be filmed. However, after changes had been made in two different scripts, Breen softened his objections and stated that, as long as Kathie does not appear to be living with Jeff, the story would be approved. In the film, Kathie and Jeff's living arrangements are left rather vague. Breen also objected to Jeff's "deliberate suicide" at the end, but agreed that his demise was morally necessary.

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