Odd Man Out
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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006

10 items from 2014


Which is the greatest British film in history? No one seems to be in agreement

11 October 2014 5:32 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Best British movies of all time? (Image: a young Michael Caine in 'Get Carter') Ten years ago, Get Carter, starring Michael Caine as a dangerous-looking London gangster (see photo above), was selected as the United Kingdom's very best movie of all time according to 25 British film critics polled by Total Film magazine. To say that Mike Hodges' 1971 thriller was a surprising choice would be an understatement. I mean, not a David Lean epic or an early Alfred Hitchcock thriller? What a difference ten years make. On Total Film's 2014 list, published last May, Get Carter was no. 44 among the magazine's Top 50 best British movies of all time. How could that be? Well, first of all, people would be very naive if they took such lists seriously, whether we're talking Total Film, the British Film Institute, or, to keep things British, Sight & Sound magazine. Second, whereas Total Film's 2004 list was the result of a 25-critic consensus, »

- Andre Soares

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Telluride Film Review: ‘Escobar: Paradise Lost’

31 August 2014 1:06 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

A Canadian surfer finds himself in the deadliest closeout of his life — on dry land — in “Escobar: Paradise Lost,” which imagines that downfall of Colombian drug kingpin Pablo Escobar (played by Benicio Del Toro) as seen through the eyes of a naive acolyte drawn into his web. The directorial debut of veteran Italian actor Andrea di Stefano (“The Prince of Homburg,” “Eat Pray Love”), “Escobar” offers and Di Stefano’s assured, muscular helming. Pickled up during production by Weinstein Co. subsidiary Radius, this smarter-than-average genre pic (scheduled for a Nov. 26 release) could prove a robust performer in niche theatrical and VOD play, especially if it connects with the large and underserved Latino moviegoing crowd.

It’s fitting that Di Stefano took pause to note the presence of Francis Coppola in the audience for the film’s Telluride world premiere, since one needn’t look too hard to see the lipstick »

- Scott Foundas

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Exclusive New Poster For '71

28 August 2014 8:00 AM, PDT | EmpireOnline | See recent EmpireOnline news »

Set over one terrifying night during a pivotal period of the Troubles, '71 is a thriller that will make your nerves audibly jangle and even your popcorn break out in a light sweat. It stars man-of-moment Jack O'Connell in another life-and-death military turn to add to his work in Angelina Jolie's Unbroken. This time, he's a British soldier left to fend for himself in territory that, as the film's new poster suggest, is hardly rolling out the red carpet for squaddies. O'Connell is Gary Hook, a newbie infantryman who is separated from his comrades when a raid goes horribly wrong. Like Carol Reed's Odd Man Out in reverse, Hook is left to negotiate a deadly rabbit warren of alleys, houses and darkened streets as he seeks to evade the Ira men hunting him down. But will he make it through the night? Frankly, we don't know, but we're strapping in for the ride. »

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Nyff 2014. Main Slate

19 August 2014 5:16 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Opening Night – World Premiere

Gone Girl

David Fincher, USA, 2014, Dcp, 150m

David Fincher’s film version of Gillian Flynn’s phenomenally successful best seller (adapted by the author) is one wild cinematic ride, a perfectly cast and intensely compressed portrait of a recession-era marriage contained within a devastating depiction of celebrity/media culture, shifting gears as smoothly as a Maserati 250F. Ben Affleck is Nick Dunne, whose wife Amy (Rosamund Pike) goes missing on the day of their fifth anniversary. Neil Patrick Harris is Amy’s old boyfriend Desi, Carrie Coon (who played Honey in Tracy Letts’s acclaimed production of Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?) is Nick’s sister Margo, Kim Dickens (TremeFriday Night Lights) is Detective Rhonda Boney, and Tyler Perry is Nick’s superstar lawyer Tanner Bolt. At once a grand panoramic vision of middle America, a uniquely disturbing exploration of the fault lines in a marriage, »

- Notebook

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‘Honorable Woman’ Writer-Director Hugo Blick Talks His ‘Meditative Pace,’ Why Viewers Should Stick Around

30 July 2014 12:20 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Hugo Blick wants viewers to know that “The Honorable Woman,” which he wrote and directed for co-producers BBC and SundanceTV, will reward its patient and dedicated viewers. “I have a meditative pace,” Blick told TheWrap when asked about the way he disperses information in “The Honorable Woman.” “The type of filmmakers I have loved in the past are people like John Boorman of ‘Point Blank,’ and Carol Reed of ‘Odd Man Out.'” “The Honorable Woman” stars Maggie Gyllenhaal in the impeccably acted role of Nessa Stein, who runs her assassinated father's company, which previously sold arms to Israel. Under her leadership, »

- Jethro Nededog

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Movie Poster of the Week: F.W. Murnau’s “Tabu” and the Posters of Boris Streimann

28 March 2014 9:13 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Above: 1978 re-release poster for Tabu (F.W. Murnau, USA, 1931)

I only recently came across the posters of German artist Boris Streimann (1908-1984)—who was known to also sign his work as B. Namir—and was immediately struck by both the dynamism and the color of his work. The author of hundreds, if not thousands, of posters from the late 20s through the late 60s, Streimann loved diagonals. All of the posters I have selected— the best of his work that I could find—work off a strong diagonal line, with even his varied and very inventive title treatments (which could have been the work of another designer) often placed on an angle. On top of the sheer energy and movement of his posters, his use of color is extraordinary: brash and expressionistic like his brushwork. I especially love the multi-colored accordion in Port of Freedom, the loin cloth in Tabu, and »

- Adrian Curry

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Odd Thomas | Review

24 February 2014 9:00 AM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Odd Man Out: Delayed Koontz Adaptation a Tone Deaf Misfire

Filmed way back in 2011 and then delayed indefinitely in 2013 due to legal actions woes in relation to marketing and advertising funds, Stephen Sommers’ adaptation of Dean Koontz’s novel, Odd Thomas, at long last arrives after notable anticipation. The first of a series of novels, the success of the film will dictate future adaptations, but the results, especially after such a long gestational period, are superbly woeful. Questionable casting and a gruesomely synthetic screenplay that awkwardly veers from broad comedy to schmoozy romance to demonic hunting super hero scenario gives the film an unappealing adolescent quality that only gets worse as the film drags on and on.

Odd Thomas (Anton Yelchin), resides in the small California desert town, Pico Mundo. Having somewhat of a strange reputation due to his name, thus coined by his mother who now resides in »

- Nicholas Bell

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'71 – first look review

7 February 2014 9:50 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

A young English squaddie is trapped in a hostile area of Belfast, 1971 in director Yann Demange's harrowing drama, writes Andrew Pulver

• Berlin 2014: Wes Anderson's Grand Budapest Hotel - review

• More on the Berlin film festival

The Northern Ireland Troubles emerge as a phantasmagoric nightmare in this harrowing, powerful study of a single violent night in Belfast in, as the title indicates, 1971. The date is key: the sectarian conflict in the North had only recently reignited after the civil rights campaigns of the mid 60s, and British soldiers deployed on the streets in 1969. Within a short time both republican and loyalists were engaged in copious bloodletting; the British army, jumpy and out of its depth, had little experience with dealing with hostile civilians so close to home. 1971 saw internment introduced; the following year, 1972, was the Troubles' most deadly, with nearly 500 killings.

This, then, is the historical backdrop: we »

- Andrew Pulver

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Film, TV Producer Paul Pompian Dies at 72

20 January 2014 2:26 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Award winning motion picture and television producer Paul Pompian, best known for films including “The Watcher,” “Swimming Upstream,” “Waste Land,” Truman Capote’s “Children on Their Birthdays,” “Resurrection,” “The Stepford Children,” “Time Served,” “Guests of the Emperor,” “The Preppie Murder,” “Fatal Deception: The Marina Oswald Story,” “Death of a Centerfold: The Dorothy Stratten Story” and “Joshua,” died of leukemia on January 1 at the City of Hope in Duarte, Calif. He was 72.

Pompian produced more than 50 film and TV productions, working first with Roger Corman’s New World Pictures beginning in 1971, and then with MGM, Universal Pictures, Lionsgate, Aeg, and his own production company.

At the time of his death, Pompian had several projects in various stages of development, including “Operation Family Secrets” based on his Random House book co-authored by Keith and Kent Zimmerman. He was also in pre-production on “Short Cut Man” written by Preston Sturges Jr. and to be directed by Neil Tardio, »

- Variety Staff

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Film, TV Producer Paul Pompian Dies at 72

20 January 2014 2:26 PM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Award winning motion picture and television producer Paul Pompian, best known for films including “The Watcher,” “Swimming Upstream,” “Waste Land,” Truman Capote’s “Children on Their Birthdays,” “Resurrection,” “The Stepford Children,” “Time Served,” “Guests of the Emperor,” “The Preppie Murder,” “Fatal Deception: The Marina Oswald Story,” “Death of a Centerfold: The Dorothy Stratten Story” and “Joshua,” died of leukemia on January 1 at the City of Hope in Duarte, Calif. He was 72.

Pompian produced more than 50 film and TV productions, working first with Roger Corman’s New World Pictures beginning in 1971, and then with MGM, Universal Pictures, Lionsgate, Aeg, and his own production company.

At the time of his death, Pompian had several projects in various stages of development, including “Operation Family Secrets” based on his Random House book co-authored by Keith and Kent Zimmerman. He was also in pre-production on “Short Cut Man” written by Preston Sturges Jr. and to be directed by Neil Tardio, »

- Variety Staff

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006

10 items from 2014


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