Nightmare Alley (1947) - News Poster

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The Captive City | Blu-ray Review

  • ioncinema
Two obscure Robert Wise titles reach Blu-ray release this month, both direct follow-ups to some of the auteur’s more iconic works. First up is 1962’s Two for the Seesaw, a romantic drama headlined by Robert Mitchum and Shirley MacLaine following the famed 1961 title West Side Story. But the decade prior would fine Wise unveiling one of his most stilted efforts, The Captive City (1952), a sort-of noir procedural which followed his sci-fi social commentary The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951). Providing John Forsythe with his first starring role (a performer who would find his most famous roles decades later on television, as Blake Carrington in “Dynasty,” and of course, the famous voice in “Charlie’s Angels”), it has to be one of the most unenthusiastic renderings of organized crime ever committed to celluloid. A scrappy journalist defies the mob ruled police force and a slick Mafia boss in a tired
See full article at ioncinema »

Scott Reviews Jules Dassin’s Thieves’ Highway [Arrow Films Blu-ray Review]

Jules Dassin didn’t do much in the way of subversion. At least not cinematically. He didn’t have many overarching themes to his work, he didn’t twist his genre films into something they weren’t. What he did was utilize every one of the handful of tools he was given, and pushed his films to their absolute breaking point. His subversion was a sort of perversion, an excess of imagination and a willingness to show the world as he saw it. If that meant creating a filmography that looked suspicious to the House Committee of Un-American Activities, well, that was just the natural result of having an eye and an ear for how the common man lived.

It can’t have helped that his last film before the blacklist order came down was Thieves’ Highway, an all-out indictment of capitalism cloaked in the noir-drenched mode of a typical Fox gritty,
See full article at CriterionCast »

NYC Weekend Watch: ‘Out 1,’ Noir, Akerman, ‘Strange Days,’ ‘Johnny Guitar’ & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

BAMcinématek

This is the final weekend for marathon screenings of Out 1. We highly recommend taking the plunge.

Museum of the Moving Image

“Lonely Places: Film Noir and the American Landscape” highlights a different atmosphere of the noir picture, and it makes its case with some great films. Out of the Past shows on Friday; Saturday
See full article at The Film Stage »

Remembering Kubrick Actress Gray Pt.2: From The Killing to Leech Woman and Off-Screen School Prayer Amendment Fighter

Coleen Gray in 'The Sleeping City' with Richard Conte. Coleen Gray after Fox: B Westerns and films noirs (See previous post: “Coleen Gray Actress: From Red River to Film Noir 'Good Girls'.”) Regarding the demise of her Fox career (the year after her divorce from Rod Amateau), Coleen Gray would recall for Confessions of a Scream Queen author Matt Beckoff: I thought that was the end of the world and that I was a total failure. I was a mass of insecurity and depended on agents. … Whether it was an 'A' picture or a 'B' picture didn't bother me. It could be a Western movie, a sci-fi film. A job was a job. You did the best with the script that you had. Fox had dropped Gray at a time of dramatic upheavals in the American film industry: fast-dwindling box office receipts as a result of competition from television,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Remembering Actress Gray: Underappreciated Film Noir Heroine

Coleen Gray actress ca. 1950. Coleen Gray: Actress in early Stanley Kubrick film noir, destroyer of men in cult horror 'classic' Actress Coleen Gray, best known as the leading lady in Stanley Kubrick's film noir The Killing and – as far as B horror movie aficionados are concerned – for playing the title role in The Leech Woman, died at age 92 in Aug. 2015. This two-part article, which focuses on Gray's film career, is a revised and expanded version of the original post published at the time of her death. Born Doris Bernice Jensen on Oct. 23, 1922, in Staplehurst, Nebraska, at a young age she moved with her parents, strict Lutheran Danish farmers, to Minnesota. After getting a degree from St. Paul's Hamline University, she relocated to Southern California to be with her then fiancé, an army private. At first, she eked out a living as a waitress at a La Jolla hotel
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Remembering Actress Gray: Underappreciated Film Noir Heroine

Coleen Gray actress ca. 1950. Coleen Gray: Actress in early Stanley Kubrick film noir, destroyer of men in cult horror 'classic' Actress Coleen Gray, best known as the leading lady in Stanley Kubrick's film noir The Killing and – as far as B horror movie aficionados are concerned – for playing the title role in The Leech Woman, died at age 92 in Aug. 2015. This two-part article, which focuses on Gray's film career, is a revised and expanded version of the original post published at the time of her death. Born Doris Bernice Jensen on Oct. 23, 1922, in Staplehurst, Nebraska, at a young age she moved with her parents, strict Lutheran Danish farmers, to Minnesota. After getting a degree from St. Paul's Hamline University, she relocated to Southern California to be with her then fiancé, an army private. At first, she eked out a living as a waitress at a La Jolla hotel
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Daily | Artforum, La Furia Umana, Bordwell

  • Keyframe
James Quandt in the new issue of Artforum on Jafar Panahi's Taxi: "That the director of such teeming, expansive works as The Circle (2000) and Offside (2006) should find himself limited to the confines of a car may seem lamentable, but Taxi has illustrious cab-bound ancestors, most obviously Ten (2002) by Panahi’s mentor, Abbas Kiarostami, as well as Jim Jarmusch’s Night on Earth (1991). And with the intrepid Panahi in the driver’s seat as both novice cabbie and veteran filmmaker, spatial restrictions predictably provide ample opportunity for formal innovation." Also today: David Bordwell on Edmund Goulding's Nightmare Alley, La Furia Umana on Manoel de Oliveira—and more. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Coleen Gray, star of film noir and Stanley Kubrick's The Killing, dies at 92

Actor who flourished during the 40s in films like Kiss of Death and Nightmare Alley, as well as Kubrick’s celebrated heist movie, has died

One of the last links to the glory years of the Hollywood film noir, Coleen Gray, has died at the age of 92. Gray was best known for her roles in the 1940s thrillers Kiss of Death and Nightmare Alley, both released in 1947 by 20th Century Fox for whom she was a contracted player, and for Stanley Kubrick’s The Killing, almost a decade later.

Related: Coleen Gray obituary

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Coleen Gray, star of film noir and Stanley Kubrick's The Killing, dies at 92

Actor who flourished during the 40s in films like Kiss of Death and Nightmare Alley, as well as Kubrick’s celebrated heist movie, has died

One of the last links to the glory years of the Hollywood film noir, Coleen Gray, has died at the age of 92. Gray was best known for her roles in the 1940s thrillers Kiss of Death and Nightmare Alley, both released in 1947 by 20th Century Fox for whom she was a contracted player, and for Stanley Kubrick’s The Killing, almost a decade later.

Related: Coleen Gray obituary

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Coleen Gray obituary

Actor who was often cast as the understanding girlfriend or steadfast wife in film noirs of the 1940s and 50s such as Kiss of Death and The Killing

The 2001 book Dark City Dames: The Wicked Women of Film Noir contained interviews with six female stars of the genre who were at their peak in the 1940s and 50s. One surprising inclusion was Coleen Gray, who has died aged 92. Surprising because she was seldom cast as a femme fatale in the classic film noirs in which she appeared.

In fact, Gray, with her pretty features, slightly pointed nose and wide eyes, was often the only ethical or innocent element in the dark, doom-laden crime dramas. In Kiss of Death (1947), she is the understanding girlfriend of an ex-con (Victor Mature), helping him to make a new life. In Nightmare Alley (1947), she is the steadfast wife and partner of Stan (Tyrone Power) in a carnival mind-reading act,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Coleen Gray, Star of ‘The Killing’ and ‘Kiss of Death,’ Dies at 92

Coleen Gray, Star of ‘The Killing’ and ‘Kiss of Death,’ Dies at 92
Coleen Gray, best known for her role in Stanley Kubrick’s heist thriller “The Killing,” died of natural causes on Monday at her home in Bel Air, Calif. She was 92.

“My last dame is gone. Always had the feeling she’d be the last to go,” Eddie Muller, founder and president of the Film Noir Foundation, wrote on Facebook. He became friends with Gray while collaborating on his 2001 book “Dark City Dames: The Wicked Women of Film Noir.”

Gray played the accomplice of Sterling Hayden, the leader of a gang of thieves, in Kubrick’s “Killing.” She famously uttered the line, “I may not be pretty and I may not be smart …”

Gray appeared in a slew of films in the late 1940s and ’50s, primarily noir thrillers, including Henry Hathaway’s “Kiss of Death” (1947), as the film’s narrator and ex-con Victor Mature’s love interest; Tyrone Power’s
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Early Kubrick Leading Lady in Classic Film Noir Dead at 92

Coleen Gray ca. 1950. Coleen Gray dead at 92: Leading lady in early Stanley Kubrick film noir classic Actress Coleen Gray, best known for Stanley Kubrick's crime drama The Killing, has died. Her death was announced by Classic Images contributor Laura Wagner on Facebook's “Film Noir” group. Wagner's source was David Schecter, who had been friends with the actress for quite some time. Via private message, he has confirmed Gray's death of natural causes earlier today, Aug. 3, '15, at her home in Bel Air, on the Los Angeles Westside. Gray (born on Oct. 23, 1922, in Staplehurst, Nebraska) was 92. Coleen Gray movies As found on the IMDb, Coleen Gray made her film debut as an extra in the 20th Century Fox musical State Fair (1945), starring Jeanne Crain and Dana Andrews. Her association with film noir began in 1947, with the release of Henry Hathaway's Kiss of Death (1947), notable for showing Richard Widmark
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Tcmff 2015: ‘Nightmare Alley’ is an under-appreciated Carny-Noir

Nightmare Alley

Written by Jules Furthman

Directed by Edmund Goulding

U.S.A., 1947

A carny cons his way up to high society through cold-reading and (un)timely circumstance. Based on that one-liner, who would you cast? If you say Tyrone Power, I’d say that my friend Stan Carlisle is on his way (The name Stan Carlisle being a con-industry handshake of sorts, informing one con-artist that he’s stepping in on another man’s con, or at least according to Eddie “The Czar of Noir” Muller’s introduction of this film at Tcmff). In Nightmare Alley, Tyrone Power, the 20th Century Fox matinee idol, plays a lowlife con man, who lies and cheats his way from a podunk carnival to becoming a spiritualist amongst the more gullible of Chicago’s upper crust. His character is also the namesake of the above con slang.

And any which way, yes, Tyrone Power
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Join The Academy on Sept 9th for Young Frankenstein 40th Anniversary Screening

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences will present a 40th anniversary screening of “Young Frankenstein” with special guests Mel Brooks, Cloris Leachman, Teri Garr and executive producer Michael Gruskoff on Tuesday, September 9, at 7:30 p.m. at the Academy’s Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills. Film historian Leonard Maltin will introduce the comedy classic and host a live onstage discussion with Brooks, Leachman, Garr and Gruskoff.

Young Frankenstein,” Brooks’s 1974 homage to the Golden Age of monster movies, features a large ensemble cast including Leachman, Garr, Gene Wilder, Peter Boyle, Marty Feldman, Madeline Kahn, Kenneth Mars and Gene Hackman. It earned Oscar® nominations for Adapted Screenplay (Wilder, Brooks) and Sound (Richard Portman, Gene Cantamessa).

Additional Academy events coming up in September at the Bing Theater in Los Angeles are listed below, with details at www.oscars.org/events:

“Let There Be Fright: William Castle Scare Classics”

The
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

‘Nightmare Alley’ is a dark, pessimistic descent into compulsion and greed

  • SoundOnSight
Nightmare Alley

Written by Jules Furthman

Directed by Edmund Goulding

U.S.A., 1947

Who can tell when they are being conned? Or lied to for that matter? Some people are blessed (or cursed) with a potentially dangerous gift, that of being able to fool their way into earning other people’s confidence. It is a perverse talent to say the least, a double-edged sword. When caught in a rut, the ability to smooth talk one’s way to calmer shores is commendable, but when the same talents are applied by someone with far fewer moral scruples, then the consequences may ultimately prove painful for both the con victim and the artist. Nightmare Alley, directed by Edmund Goulding, is a bit of an anomaly within film noir for its setting and the sort of protagonist the story evolves around. In fact, the case can be made that he is more antagonist than protagonist.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Exclusive: Editor Charles Ardai Discusses Joyland, Working with Stephen King, and Producing the TV Show Haven

Stephen King's new novel, Joyland (review here), is set to release on June 4th, and we had a chance to chat with the book's editor, Charles Ardai.

Ardai, who is also a producer on the TV show "Haven," spoke about the upcoming release and what fans can expect, working with Stephen King, and lots more.

Amanda Dyar: First off, can you tell us how you got involved with Joyland and why fans should pick it up?

Charles Ardai: In 2005, Hard Case Crime was fortunate enough to get to publish a new book by Stephen King called The Colorado Kid. We stayed in touch on and off over the next 8 years, and at one point Steve sent me email saying he’d just finished writing another book he thought might be right for us, and would I like to take a look. Would I? I’d have walked
See full article at Dread Central »

Spanish Prisoners: 5 Indispensable Books of Scam Fiction

  • Boomtron
Neil Gaiman and Jim Thompson bonded by Scam Fiction?

It’s all a scam, isn’t it?

My alarm goes off in the morning and I eat some cereal some marketer scammed me into thinking tastes good and is good for me. I wash myself with products I’ve been scammed into thinking will make me more pleasant company. I buy cigarettes I’ve scammed myself into thinking won’t really shorten my life from a convenience store clerk who scams me into thinking I’m paying a fair price. I go to my day-job and scam my boss into thinking I’m working hard just as he scams me into thinking my paycheck is as much as I deserve. Then I come home and attempt to scam you fine people into thinking I know what I’m talking about when it comes to crime fiction.

But of course, you’re too smart for that.
See full article at Boomtron »

AFI Fest 2011

  • MUBI
This year's AFI Fest opens this evening in Los Angeles with Clint Eastwood's J. Edgar, closes on November 10 with Steven Spielberg and Peter Jackson's The Adventures of Tintin and, as the Playlist is reporting today, the festival will host the world premiere of Steven Soderbergh's Haywire on Sunday: "Haywire marks the big screen debut of Mma fighter Gina Carano, who takes the lead in the gritty spy thriller written by Lem Dobbs (The Limey) about Mallory Kane, a black ops soldier on a mission of revenge after she's double crossed by one of her teammates. As usual, Soderbergh has assembled a crackerjack ensemble that includes Michael Fassbender, Channing Tatum, Ewan McGregor, Michael Douglas, Bill Paxton, Michael Angarano, Matthieu Kassovitz and Antonio Banderas… 'People really get hit in this film and they get hurt,' the director told us this summer." Update: The Playlist's headline's been tweaked; Haywire
See full article at MUBI »

Pedro Almodóvar Selects Four Classics, Law Of Desire Screening: AFI Fest 2011

AFI Fest 2011 Guest Artistic Director Pedro Almodóvar has selected the following classic thrillers to be presented at the festival: Georges Franju's Eyes Without a Face, Jean-Pierre Melville's Le Cercle rouge, Edmund Goulding's Nightmare Alley, and Robert Siodmak's The Killers. Why this particular quartet? "Because in some way, albeit tangentially, they have a relationship with my present." Eyes Without a Face, in which a doctor uses the skin of young women to help restore the face of his disfigured daughter, certainly has some elements in common with Almodóvar's latest, The Skin I Live In. Pierre Brasseur and Alida Valli shine in this creepily poetic classic. The crime thriller Le Cercle rouge stars Alain Delon, Yves Montand, Gian Maria Volonté, and veteran Bourvil. Starring Tyrone Power as a carnival shyster, Nightmare Alley is less an outright thriller than a dark melodrama; it was also a box-office disappointment at
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Guest Artistic Director Pedro Almodóvar Adds Four Classic Thrillers to AFI Fest

Guest Artistic Director Pedro Almodóvar Adds Four Classic Thrillers to AFI Fest
As guest artistic director of the 2011 AFI Fest, Pedro Almodóvar has selected a program of four classic thrillers that will screen during the event. Almodóvar's choices are Georges Franju's "Eyes Without a Face," Jean-Pierre Melville's "Le Cercle Rouge," Edmund Goulding's "Nightmare Alley" and Robert Siodmak's "The Killers." Almodovar said he chose the films "because in some way, albeit tangentially, they have a relationship with my present." In addition, AFI ...
See full article at Indiewire »
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