IMDb > Lady in the Lake (1947)
Lady in the Lake
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Lady in the Lake (1947) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
6.7/10   2,810 votes »
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Down 6% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Steve Fisher (screenplay)
Raymond Chandler (novel)
Contact:
View company contact information for Lady in the Lake on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
14 April 1947 (Sweden) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
DIFFERENT...DRAMATIC...DARING! (original print media ad - all caps) See more »
Plot:
The lady editor of a crime magazine hires Philip Marlowe to find the wife of her boss. The private detective soon finds himself involved in murder. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
User Reviews:
Chandler supplies grapes – pinot noir? – for film experiment of doubtful vintage See more (82 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Robert Montgomery ... Phillip Marlowe
Audrey Totter ... Adrienne Fromsett

Lloyd Nolan ... Lt. DeGarmot
Tom Tully ... Capt. Kane

Leon Ames ... Derace Kingsby

Jayne Meadows ... Mildred Havelend
Dick Simmons ... Chris Lavery
Morris Ankrum ... Eugene Grayson
Lila Leeds ... Receptionist
William Roberts ... Artist
Kathleen Lockhart ... Mrs. Grayson
Ellay Mort ... Chrystal Kingsby
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Eddie Acuff ... Ed, the Coroner (uncredited)
Charles Bradstreet ... Party Guest (uncredited)
David Cavendish ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Wheaton Chambers ... Property Clerk (uncredited)
Roger Cole ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Frank Dae ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Jack Davis ... Policeman (uncredited)
John Webb Dillon ... Policeman (uncredited)
Ralph Dunn ... Sergeant (uncredited)
Budd Fine ... Policeman (uncredited)
John Gallaudet ... Policeman (uncredited)
Sherry Hall ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Cy Kendall ... Jailer (uncredited)
Ann Lawrence ... Party Guest (uncredited)
George Magrill ... Policeman (uncredited)
Bert Moorhouse ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Sandra Morgan ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Thomas Murray ... Policeman (uncredited)
William Newell ... Drunk (uncredited)
James Nolan ... Party Guest (uncredited)
William O'Leary ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Frank Orth ... Floyd Greer (uncredited)
William McKeever Riley ... Buster, Young Party Guest (uncredited)

Ellen Ross ... Elevator Girl (uncredited)
Nina Ross ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Fred Santley ... Charlie, Party Guest (uncredited)
Fred Sherman ... Reporter (uncredited)
Florence Stephens ... Party Guest (uncredited)
George Travell ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Laura Treadwell ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Kay Wiley ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Robert Williams ... Detective (uncredited)
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Directed by
Robert Montgomery 
 
Writing credits
Steve Fisher (screenplay)

Raymond Chandler (novel)

Produced by
George Haight .... producer
 
Original Music by
David Snell 
Maurice Goldman (uncredited)
 
Cinematography by
Paul Vogel (director of photography) (as Paul C. Vogel)
 
Film Editing by
Gene Ruggiero 
 
Art Direction by
E. Preston Ames  (as Preston Ames)
Cedric Gibbons 
 
Set Decoration by
Edwin B. Willis 
 
Makeup Department
Jack Dawn .... makeup designer
Sydney Guilaroff .... hair designer: Miss Totter
 
Production Management
Robert E. Barnes .... unit manager (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Dolph Zimmer .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Thomas Theuerkauf .... associate set decorator
 
Sound Department
Douglas Shearer .... recording director
 
Special Effects by
A. Arnold Gillespie .... special effects
 
Camera and Electrical Department
J. Harper .... camera operator (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Irene .... costume supervisor
Eugene Joseff .... costume jeweller (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Maurice Goldman .... choral director
Wally Heglin .... orchestrator (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Robert Spencer .... stand-in: Robert Montgomery (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
105 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Sound System)
Certification:
Argentina:13 | Canada:PG (video rating) | Finland:K-16 | Netherlands:AL (2005) (DVD) | Sweden:15 | USA:Approved (PCA #11803)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The entire movie plot unfolds from lead Robert Montgomery's point of view, thus creating a rarity in film: the principal character is only seen on-screen as a reflection in mirrors and windows, and as the narrator speaking directly to the audience.See more »
Goofs:
Factual errors: Audrey Totter's character uses the word "deducted" rather than the correct "deduced."See more »
Quotes:
Adrienne Fromsett:[on Marlowe's submission] I plan to slash the emotion right out of that story.See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Kiss Kiss Bang Bang (2005)See more »
Soundtrack:
Deck the Halls with Boughs of HollySee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
35 out of 43 people found the following review useful.
Chandler supplies grapes – pinot noir? – for film experiment of doubtful vintage, 28 August 2002
Author: bmacv from Western New York

For a suspense writer whose observations of mid-20th-century Los Angeles proved so gimlet-eyed that he has been enshrined as the city's unofficial bard, Raymond Chandler had a bumpy fling with Hollywood. The first of his five major novels to be filmed during the classic period of film noir, Farewell, My Lovely was first turned into an installment in the Falcon series of programmers, then into Edward Dmytryk's 1944 Murder, My Sweet (a success, but too short; to do justice to Chandler's atmospherics and milieu demands longer time spans than the movies allot them).

From 1946, probably the most adroit blending of style and content taken from his works was Howard Hawks' The Big Sleep. But its popularity, then and now, owes as much to the chemistry between Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall – and to the frisky, irreverent tone Hawks brought to the movie – as to Chandler, whose outlook was one of dispassionate observation tinged with disgust.

The following year, The Brasher Doubloon, from the book The High Window, can be deemed a failure. That leaves the odd case of The Lady in the Lake, also from ‘47, which Robert Montgomery, starring as Philip Marlowe, ill-advisedly decided to direct himself. The movie labors under two huge handicaps: one of technique, the other of tone.

Cited often (and often by those who may not have actually seen the movie) for its subjective use of the-camera-as-character, The Lady in The Lake flounders on an idea that may have sounded good when initially floated but had to have looked bad once the first rushes came in.

Except for an explanatory prologue (the necessity for which should have raised red flags) or in scenes where he's caught in a window or mirror, Montgomery's Marlowe remains unseen. We, through the camera lens, are the detective. Conceivably, this gimmick might have worked at a later date, when swift, lithe Steadicams were part of Hollywood's technical arsenal. But in1947, the camera lumbers along as though it were being shoved through wet sand. As a result the pace slows to deadening, as though a senescent Marlowe were tracking down clues from the rail of an aluminum walker.

In consequence, time that might profitably been expended on filling in missing pieces of the puzzle gets wasted on Marlowe's getting from point A to point B. Vital and evocative parts of Chandler's novel take place in the summer resort areas of Puma Point and Little Fawn Lake; that snail of a camera, however, was not up to a hike in the great outdoors, so the movie preserves none of them.

And in tossing away chunks of the novels to accommodate budgets and shooting schedules, movie versions (like this one) mistake Chandler's strengths, which did not lay in plot. (The scriptwriters on The Big Sleep, including William Faulkner, couldn't figure out who killed one of the characters, so they asked Chandler, who didn't know either.)

His strengths were in weaving intricate webs of duplicity and deceit shot through with corruption and dread. That was heavy fare for Hollywood – even during the noir cycle. So stories tended to be simplified and atmosphere lightened: the freighted response gave way to the wisecrack, suggestive tension between two characters turned into a meet-cute, the brooding loner became a red-blooded American joe.

So, in The Lady in The Lake, the icy and questionable Adrienne Fromsett of the book (Audrey Totter) is now a sassy minx to Marlowe's snappy man-about-town, and so on. The plot deals with Marlowe's attempts to find a missing woman (an off-screen character whom the Christmas-card credits, in a droll fit of Francophone humor, call Ellay Mort).

Is a verdict possible? Some viewers find the movie's conceits and distortions amateurish and self-congratulating, while others overlook them to find a vintage mystery from postwar vaults. The Lady in The Lake remains a flawed experiment that over the years has developed its own distinctive – if not quite distinguished – period bouquet.



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Other Point of View Movies rob-cooper-3
Did I miss something? puppetmom
Montgomery was terrible b6283
Why Oh Why do screenwriters think they're better? schwapj
One brilliant scene theclockticks
I´ve never been seduced by a gal from 1947, those girls had my attention aciago
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