IMDb > Lady in the Lake (1947)
Lady in the Lake
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Lady in the Lake (1947) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
6.7/10   2,951 votes »
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Down 2% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Steve Fisher (screenplay)
Raymond Chandler (novel)
Contact:
View company contact information for Lady in the Lake on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
14 April 1947 (Sweden) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
DIFFERENT...DRAMATIC...DARING! (original print media ad - all caps) See more »
Plot:
The lady editor of a crime magazine hires Philip Marlowe to find the wife of her boss. The private detective soon finds himself involved in murder. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
User Reviews:
YOU Share The Viewpoint of the Crankiest Marlowe in Cinema! See more (81 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Robert Montgomery ... Phillip Marlowe
Audrey Totter ... Adrienne Fromsett

Lloyd Nolan ... Lt. DeGarmot
Tom Tully ... Capt. Kane

Leon Ames ... Derace Kingsby

Jayne Meadows ... Mildred Havelend
Dick Simmons ... Chris Lavery
Morris Ankrum ... Eugene Grayson
Lila Leeds ... Receptionist
William Roberts ... Artist
Kathleen Lockhart ... Mrs. Grayson
Ellay Mort ... Chrystal Kingsby
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Eddie Acuff ... Ed, the Coroner (uncredited)
Charles Bradstreet ... Party Guest (uncredited)
David Cavendish ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Wheaton Chambers ... Property Clerk (uncredited)
Roger Cole ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Frank Dae ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Jack Davis ... Policeman (uncredited)
John Webb Dillon ... Policeman (uncredited)
Ralph Dunn ... Sergeant (uncredited)
Budd Fine ... Policeman (uncredited)
John Gallaudet ... Policeman (uncredited)
Sherry Hall ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Cy Kendall ... Jailer (uncredited)
Ann Lawrence ... Party Guest (uncredited)
George Magrill ... Policeman (uncredited)
Bert Moorhouse ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Sandra Morgan ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Thomas Murray ... Policeman (uncredited)
William Newell ... Drunk (uncredited)
James Nolan ... Party Guest (uncredited)
William O'Leary ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Frank Orth ... Floyd Greer (uncredited)
William McKeever Riley ... Buster, Young Party Guest (uncredited)

Ellen Ross ... Elevator Girl (uncredited)
Nina Ross ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Fred Santley ... Charlie, Party Guest (uncredited)
Fred Sherman ... Reporter (uncredited)
Florence Stephens ... Party Guest (uncredited)
George Travell ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Laura Treadwell ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Kay Wiley ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Robert Williams ... Detective (uncredited)

Directed by
Robert Montgomery 
 
Writing credits
Steve Fisher (screenplay)

Raymond Chandler (novel)

Produced by
George Haight .... producer
 
Original Music by
David Snell 
Maurice Goldman (uncredited)
 
Cinematography by
Paul Vogel (director of photography) (as Paul C. Vogel)
 
Film Editing by
Gene Ruggiero 
 
Art Direction by
E. Preston Ames  (as Preston Ames)
Cedric Gibbons 
 
Set Decoration by
Edwin B. Willis 
 
Makeup Department
Jack Dawn .... makeup designer
Sydney Guilaroff .... hair designer: Miss Totter
 
Production Management
Robert E. Barnes .... unit manager (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Dolph Zimmer .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Thomas Theuerkauf .... associate set decorator
 
Sound Department
Douglas Shearer .... recording director
 
Special Effects by
A. Arnold Gillespie .... special effects
 
Camera and Electrical Department
J. Harper .... camera operator (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Irene .... costume supervisor
Eugene Joseff .... costume jeweller (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Maurice Goldman .... choral director
Wally Heglin .... orchestrator (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Robert Spencer .... stand-in: Robert Montgomery (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
105 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Sound System)
Certification:
Argentina:13 | Canada:PG (video rating) | Finland:K-16 | Netherlands:AL (2005) (DVD) | Sweden:15 | USA:Approved (PCA #11803)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The first-person camera technique used by Robert Montgomery is known as "subjective camera," and had not before been employed in this manner beyond the first few minutes of a film (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, in 1931, by pioneering director Rouben Mamoulian.)See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: During the office party scene, the group sings "Jingle Bells" but the key shifts suddenly in the middle of the song, probably due to two takes being joined together.See more »
Quotes:
Adrienne Fromsett:How d'you get back from the lake so soon?
Philip Marlowe:Fast dog team.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Kiss Kiss Bang Bang (2005)See more »
Soundtrack:
God Rest Ye Merry, GentlemenSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
43 out of 50 people found the following review useful.
YOU Share The Viewpoint of the Crankiest Marlowe in Cinema!, 16 March 2004
Author: Dorian Tenore-Bartilucci (dtb) from Whitehall, PA

Drawing on his life of crimefighting to write a short story, Raymond Chandler's tough but noble P.I. Philip Marlowe (Robert Montgomery, pulling double duty as actor and director) submits his work to Kingsby Publications, home of such pulp fiction mags as LURID DETECTIVE and MURDER MASTERPIECES. Before he can say "byline," editor Adrienne Fromsett (Audrey Totter) has Marlowe up to his neck in murder, missing dames, and crooked cops -- and you can see things Marlowe's way, literally! Before all those slasher movies came along during the last couple of decades, LADY IN THE LAKE used the subjective camera treatment -- hell, the camera was practically a character in the flick! Throughout most of LADY..., we see everything exactly as Marlowe sees it; the only times we see Marlowe/Montgomery's face is when he looks in a mirror, as well as in a brief prologue, an entrè-acte segment, and an epilogue. In the trailer (featured on the spiffy new DVD version of LADY..., along with an enjoyable and informative commentary track by film historians Alain Silver and James Ursini), MGM's publicity department did its best to push the film as the first interactive movie experience: "MGM presents a Revolutionary motion picture; the most amazing since Talkies began! YOU and ROBERT MONTGOMERY solve a murder mystery together! YOU accept an invitation to a blonde's apartment! YOU get socked in the jaw by a murder suspect!" YOU occasionally start snickering in spite of yourself when the subjective camera gimmick teeters dangerously close to parodying itself, like when Totter moves in for a smooch with Our Hero The Camera. Some of Totter's facial expressions in the first half of the film as she spars verbally with Montgomery are pretty funny, too, though I'm not sure all of them were meant to be (she uses the arched eyebrow technique done so much more effectively later by Eunice Gayson of DR. NO and FROM Russia WITH LOVE, Leonard Nimoy, CQ's Angela Lindvall, The Rock, et al... :-). Having said that, the subjective camera technique works more often than not; in particular, I thought the fight scenes and a harrowing sequence where an injured Marlowe crawls out of his wrecked car worked beautifully. It helps that Steve Fisher provided a good solid screenplay for Raymond Chandler's novel, though Chandler purists were annoyed that the novel's pivotal Little Fawn Lake sequence was relegated to a speech in the recap scene in the middle (apparently they tried to film that scene on location, but the subjective camera treatment proved harder to do in the great outdoors, so they gave up). The performances are quite good overall, including Lloyd Nolan as a dirty cop and an intense dramatic turn by young Jayne Meadows. Montgomery's sardonic snap mostly works well for cynical Marlowe, though he sometimes forgets to tone it down during tender dialogue, making him sound simply cranky. Totter eventually tones down her mugging and becomes genuinely affecting as her Adrienne lets down her guard and begins falling for Marlowe. You may love or hate this LADY..., but if you enjoy mysteries and you're intrigued by offbeat movie-making techniques, give her a try!

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Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for Lady in the Lake (1947)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Other Point of View Movies rob-cooper-3
Did any of you actually read the book?? romeo69_xoxo
Did I miss something? puppetmom
But where was the Lake? waldenpond88
Montgomery was terrible b6283
Why Oh Why do screenwriters think they're better? schwapj
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