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Lady in the Lake (1947)

Approved | | Crime, Film-Noir, Mystery | 14 April 1947 (Sweden)
The lady editor of a crime magazine hires Philip Marlowe to find the wife of her boss. The private detective soon finds himself involved in murder.

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Writers:

(screenplay), (novel)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
...
...
Lt. DeGarmot
...
Capt. Kane
...
Derace Kingsby
...
Mildred Havelend
...
Chris Lavery
...
Eugene Grayson
...
Receptionist
...
Artist
Kathleen Lockhart ...
Mrs. Grayson
Ellay Mort ...
Chrystal Kingsby
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Storyline

The camera shows Phillip Marlowe's view from the first-person in this adaptation of Raymond Chandler's book. The detective is hired to find a publisher's wife, who is supposed to have run off to Mexico. But the case soon becomes much more complicated as people are murdered. Written by Ken Yousten <kyousten@bev.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

M*G*M presents a Revolutionary motion picture; the most amazing since Talkies began! YOU and ROBERT MONTGOMERY solve a murder mystery together! See more »


Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

14 April 1947 (Sweden)  »

Also Known As:

A Dama do Lago  »

Box Office

Budget:

$1,026,000 (estimated)
 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The first-person camera technique used by Robert Montgomery is known as "subjective camera," and had not before been employed in this manner beyond the first few minutes of a film (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, in 1931, by pioneering director Rouben Mamoulian.) Raymond Chander didn't think the technique would work. After hearing that it was going to be utilized from co-writer Steve Fisher, the author called the studio the next day to complain. It apparently was a contributing factor to Chandler's refusal to take a film credit. See more »

Goofs

Audrey Totter's character uses the word "deducted" rather than the correct "deduced." See more »

Quotes

Derris Kingsby: Mr. Marlowe, may I speak to you?
Philip Marlowe: Why not? Everybody's been speaking to me.
See more »

Crazy Credits

SPOILER! In the opening credits Crystal Kingsby is written as being played by Ellay Mort, the phonetic spelling for 'elle est morte', French for 'she is dead' See more »

Connections

Referenced in Enter the Void (2009) See more »

Soundtracks

God Rest Ye Merry, Gentlemen
(uncredited)
Traditional Christmas song
Played during the opening credits
See more »

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User Reviews

 
YOU Share The Viewpoint of the Crankiest Marlowe in Cinema!
16 March 2004 | by (Whitehall, PA) – See all my reviews

Drawing on his life of crimefighting to write a short story, Raymond Chandler's tough but noble P.I. Philip Marlowe (Robert Montgomery, pulling double duty as actor and director) submits his work to Kingsby Publications, home of such pulp fiction mags as LURID DETECTIVE and MURDER MASTERPIECES. Before he can say "byline," editor Adrienne Fromsett (Audrey Totter) has Marlowe up to his neck in murder, missing dames, and crooked cops -- and you can see things Marlowe's way, literally! Before all those slasher movies came along during the last couple of decades, LADY IN THE LAKE used the subjective camera treatment -- hell, the camera was practically a character in the flick! Throughout most of LADY..., we see everything exactly as Marlowe sees it; the only times we see Marlowe/Montgomery's face is when he looks in a mirror, as well as in a brief prologue, an entrè-acte segment, and an epilogue. In the trailer (featured on the spiffy new DVD version of LADY..., along with an enjoyable and informative commentary track by film historians Alain Silver and James Ursini), MGM's publicity department did its best to push the film as the first interactive movie experience: "MGM presents a Revolutionary motion picture; the most amazing since Talkies began! YOU and ROBERT MONTGOMERY solve a murder mystery together! YOU accept an invitation to a blonde's apartment! YOU get socked in the jaw by a murder suspect!" YOU occasionally start snickering in spite of yourself when the subjective camera gimmick teeters dangerously close to parodying itself, like when Totter moves in for a smooch with Our Hero The Camera. Some of Totter's facial expressions in the first half of the film as she spars verbally with Montgomery are pretty funny, too, though I'm not sure all of them were meant to be (she uses the arched eyebrow technique done so much more effectively later by Eunice Gayson of DR. NO and FROM Russia WITH LOVE, Leonard Nimoy, CQ's Angela Lindvall, The Rock, et al... :-). Having said that, the subjective camera technique works more often than not; in particular, I thought the fight scenes and a harrowing sequence where an injured Marlowe crawls out of his wrecked car worked beautifully. It helps that Steve Fisher provided a good solid screenplay for Raymond Chandler's novel, though Chandler purists were annoyed that the novel's pivotal Little Fawn Lake sequence was relegated to a speech in the recap scene in the middle (apparently they tried to film that scene on location, but the subjective camera treatment proved harder to do in the great outdoors, so they gave up). The performances are quite good overall, including Lloyd Nolan as a dirty cop and an intense dramatic turn by young Jayne Meadows. Montgomery's sardonic snap mostly works well for cynical Marlowe, though he sometimes forgets to tone it down during tender dialogue, making him sound simply cranky. Totter eventually tones down her mugging and becomes genuinely affecting as her Adrienne lets down her guard and begins falling for Marlowe. You may love or hate this LADY..., but if you enjoy mysteries and you're intrigued by offbeat movie-making techniques, give her a try!


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Did any of you actually read the book?? romeo69_xoxo
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