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William Schallert, Former SAG President and ‘Patty Duke Show’ Star, Dies at 93

William Schallert, Former SAG President and ‘Patty Duke Show’ Star, Dies at 93
Former SAG president William Schallert, best known as TV dad Martin Lane on “The Patty Duke Show,” died Sunday in Pacific Palisades, Calif. He was 93. His son Edwin confirmed his death.

His most memorable role was as beloved TV dad Martin Lane on “The Patty Duke Show” (1963-66). The performance still resonates: TV Guide slotted him at No. 39 on its list of Greatest TV Dads of All Time in 2004.

Schallert would be familiar to many for his memorable appearance on the famous “The Trouble With Tribbles” episode of the original “Star Trek” series: He played Nilz Baris, the agriculture undersecretary who is outraged to discover that the furry, endlessly reproducing aliens have devoured all the grain.

Schallert served as SAG president from 1979-81 and oversaw a three-month strike in 1980 that centered around rates and residuals for pay TV, videocassettes and videodiscs and included a successful boycott of the year’s primetime Emmy Awards.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

William Schallert, Former SAG President and ‘Patty Duke Show’ Star, Dies at 93

William Schallert, Former SAG President and ‘Patty Duke Show’ Star, Dies at 93
Former SAG president William Schallert, best known as TV dad Martin Lane on “The Patty Duke Show,” died Sunday in Pacific Palisades, Calif. He was 93. His son Edwin confirmed his death.

His most memorable role was as beloved TV dad Martin Lane on “The Patty Duke Show” (1963-66). The performance still resonates: TV Guide slotted him at No. 39 on its list of Greatest TV Dads of All Time in 2004.

Schallert would be familiar to many for his memorable appearance on the famous “The Trouble With Tribbles” episode of the original “Star Trek” series: He played Nilz Baris, the agriculture undersecretary who is outraged to discover that the furry, endlessly reproducing aliens have devoured all the grain.

Schallert served as SAG president from 1979-81 and oversaw a three-month strike in 1980 that centered around rates and residuals for pay TV, videocassettes and videodiscs and included a successful boycott of the year’s primetime Emmy Awards.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Actress Maureen O’Hara Dies At Age 95

From the AP:

Maureen O’Hara, the flame-haired Irish movie star who appeared in classics ranging from the grim “How Green Was My Valley” to the uplifting “Miracle on 34th Street” and bantered unforgettably with John Wayne in several films. She was 95.

O’Hara died in her sleep at her home in Boise, Idaho, said Johnny Nicoletti, her longtime manager.

O’Hara received an Honorary Award at the 2014 Governors Awards.

“She passed peacefully surrounded by her loving family as they celebrated her life listening to music from her favorite movie, ‘The Quiet Man,'” said a statement from her family.

“As an actress, Maureen O’Hara brought unyielding strength and sudden sensitivity to every role she played. Her characters were feisty and fearless, just as she was in real life. She was also proudly Irish and spent her entire lifetime sharing her heritage and the wonderful culture of the Emerald Isle with the world,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

94-Year-Old O'Hara Finally Gets Academy Recognition Tonight

Maureen O'Hara movies: 2014 Honorary Oscar for Hollywood legend (photo: Maureen O'Hara at the 2014 Governors Awards) In the photo above, the movies' Maureen O'Hara, 2014 Honorary Oscar recipient for her body of work, arrives with a couple of guests at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' 2014 Governors Awards. This year's ceremony is being held this Saturday evening, November 8, in the Ray Dolby Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland Center in Hollywood. For the last couple of years, Maureen O'Hara has been a Boise, Idaho, resident. Before that, the 94-year-old movie veteran -- born Maureen FitzSimons, on August, 17, 1920, in Dublin -- had been living in Ireland. Below is a brief recap of her movies. Maureen O'Hara movies: From Charles Laughton to John Wayne Following her leading-lady role in Alfred Hitchcock's British-made Jamaica Inn, starring Charles Laughton, Maureen O'Hara arrived in Hollywood in 1939 to play the gypsy Esmeralda opposite Laughton in William Dieterle
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Rex Harrison hat on TCM: ‘My Fair Lady,’ ‘Anna and the King of SiamRex Harrison is Turner Classic Movies’ final "Summer Under the Stars" star today, August 31, 2013. TCM is currently showing George Cukor’s lavish My Fair Lady (1964), an Academy Award-winning musical that has (in my humble opinion) unfairly lost quite a bit of its prestige in the last several decades. Rex Harrison, invariably a major ham whether playing Saladin, the King of Siam, Julius Caesar, the ghost of a dead sea captain, or Richard Burton’s lover, is for once flawlessly cast as Professor Henry Higgins, who on stage transformed Julie Andrews from cockney duckling to diction-master swan and who in the movie version does the same for Audrey Hepburn. Harrison, by the way, was the year’s Best Actor Oscar winner. (See also: "Audrey Hepburn vs. Julie Andrews: Biggest Oscar Snubs.") Following My Fair Lady, Rex Harrison
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

2013 Labor Day weekend marathons: 'White Queen, 'Continuum' and more

Labor Day weekend is here for 2013 and if you don't have any plans, there are plenty of great shows to check out over the weekend. You can catch up on "Continuum" Season 2 on Syfy, or watch the first three episodes of "The White Queen" on Starz. Sunday, Sept. 1 there's a killer Alfred Hitchcock movie marathon running all day on TCM.

Also, it's college football kick-off weekend, so settle in Saturday for the guys' returning to the gridiron.

Set your DVRs and check your local listings for times and channel numbers. All times Eastern below.

Friday, Aug. 30

A&E: "Shipping Wars" and "Storage Wars" marathon, 9 a.m. to 11 p.m.

The CW: New "America's Next Top Model" episode, 9 p.m.

Discovery: "Alaskan Steel Men" premiere, 10 p.m.

Espn: Cfb, Texas Tech at Southern Methodist, 8 p.m.

Espn 2: 2013 U.S. Open Tennis, men's second and women's third round, 1 p.m. to 7 p.
See full article at Zap2It - From Inside the Box »

DVD Playhouse--August 2012

By Allen Gardner

A Separation (Sony) This drama from Iran won the 2011 Best Foreign Film Oscar, telling the story of a couple who file for a legal separation, with the wife pushing for a divorce. He won’t leave his Alzheimer’s-afflicted father behind, while she is wanting to take their young daughter with her to the United States. After a series of misunderstandings, threats and legal actions, the couple find that there is more than just their marriage that’s on the line. Hyper-realistic to a fault, reminiscent of the neo-realist films that came out of post-ww II Europe, but also repressive and redundant in the extreme, with the characters seeming to throw the same temper tantrum for two hours straight while the story, meanwhile, seems stalled. Wildly overpraised film is a real litmus test, with viewers seeming to be staunch defenders or equally impassioned detractors. It did win an Oscar,
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

20th Century Fox Digs Into Archives To Release 'The Foxes Of Harrow' On DVD For 1st Time Ever

Maybe someone at 20th Century Fox reads S&A; specifically, maybe they read This April post titled The First Book By A Black Author Adapted To Film By A Hollywood Studio Was...?, in which I talked about the adaptation of a 1946 book by African American author, Frank Yerby, titled, The Foxes of Harrow, which was the answer to the post's title question. Recall in that post I stated that the film wasn't available in any easily accessible format (DVD, Blu-ray, VOD specifically), and that I couldn't find it available anywhere? Well, wonder/search no more; this afternoon, I received a press release with a list of never-before-released titles from the Fox Cinema...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Patricia Medina obituary

A spirited damsel in distress and a familiar face in postwar Hollywood films

Although the actor Patricia Medina, who has died aged 92, had a cut-glass English accent, her voluptuous Latin looks often prevented her from playing English characters. As her name suggests, she was half-Spanish, born in Liverpool, the daughter of a Spanish father – a lawyer and former opera singer – and an English mother.

Medina, who appeared in more than 50 feature films, many of them costume dramas, was seldom called upon to display much acting ability, though she was an unusually spirited damsel in distress. However, she used the one chance she had to work with a director of magnitude, Orson Welles, in Mr Arkadin (also known as Confidential Report, 1955), to show what she was capable of. As Mily, in this breathless, globetrotting film, she is an earthy nightclub dancer who attempts to seduce the amnesiac billionaire Welles. It was
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The First Book By A Black Author Adapted To Film By A Hollywood Studio Was…?

While researching for a future books-to-film post, I suddenly wondered what the first book by a black author to be adapted to film by a Hollywood studio was…!

Anyone… anyone… anyone…?

No, Oscar Micheaux doesn’t count in this case, because, again, I’m only considering books that have been optioned and adapted by Hollywood studios.

A headscratcher… so, I went through a few books of mine that cover, in some facet, black film history, notably books by Donald Bogle, bell hooks, Manthia Diawara and Ed Guerrero, and others. And I think I found the answer within the pages of Guerrero’s Framing Blackness: The African American Image In Film (a recommended read if you haven’t read it already).

On page 28, in the chapter titled Hollywood’s Inscription Of Slavery, Guerrero mentions a 1946 book by African American author, Frank Yerby, titled, The Foxes of Harrow. Guerrero doesn’t explicitly
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

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