IMDb > Dark Passage (1947)
Dark Passage
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Dark Passage (1947) More at IMDbPro »

Photos (See all 34 | slideshow) Videos (see all 2)
Dark Passage -- Humphrey Bogart is Vincent Parry, a prison escapee framed for murder who
emerges from plastic surgery with a new face. Lauren Bacall is Irene
Jansen, Vincent's lone ally.
Dark Passage -- Bogart and Bacall in this classic trailer

Overview

User Rating:
7.6/10   11,695 votes »
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Up 27% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Delmer Daves (screenplay)
David Goodis (novel)
Contact:
View company contact information for Dark Passage on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
27 September 1947 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Two Of A Kind ! Tough . . . Torrid . . . Terrific ! See more »
Plot:
A man convicted of murdering his wife escapes from prison and works with a woman to try and prove his innocence. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
User Reviews:
You're too marvelous, too marvelous for words.... See more (122 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Humphrey Bogart ... Vincent Parry

Lauren Bacall ... Irene Jansen

Bruce Bennett ... Bob

Agnes Moorehead ... Madge Rapf
Tom D'Andrea ... Cabby (Sam)
Clifton Young ... Baker
Douglas Kennedy ... Detective Kennedy
Rory Mallinson ... George Fellsinger
Houseley Stevenson ... Dr. Walter Coley
rest of cast listed alphabetically:

John Alvin ... Blackie (scenes deleted)

John Arledge ... Lonely Man (uncredited)
Leonard Bremen ... Bus Ticket Clerk (uncredited)

Clancy Cooper ... Man on Street Seeking Match (uncredited)
Deborah Daves ... Child with Aunt Mary (uncredited)
Michael Daves ... Michael (uncredited)

Vince Edwards ... Cop at Tollbooth (uncredited)
Tom Fadden ... Diner Counterman Serving Parry (uncredited)
Bob Farber ... Policeman (uncredited)
Mary Field ... Aunt Mary (uncredited)
Ross Ford ... Ross (uncredited)
Craig Lawrence ... Bartender (uncredited)
Ian MacDonald ... Cop in Bus Depot (uncredited)
Dudie Maschmeyer ... Man (uncredited)
Patrick McVey ... Impatient Cabbie (uncredited)
Ray Montgomery ... Theatre Usher in Trailer (uncredited)
Paul Panzer ... Bus Passenger (uncredited)
Tom Reynolds ... Hotel Clerk (uncredited)
Ramon Ros ... Waiter (uncredited)
Shimen Ruskin ... Driver Hitting Kennedy (uncredited)
Anita Sharp-Bolster ... Woman (uncredited)
Jo Stafford ... Singer (voice) (uncredited)
Richard Walsh ... Policeman (uncredited)

Directed by
Delmer Daves 
 
Writing credits
Delmer Daves (screenplay)

David Goodis (novel "Dark Passage")

Produced by
Jerry Wald .... producer
Jack L. Warner .... executive producer
 
Original Music by
Franz Waxman 
 
Cinematography by
Sidney Hickox  (as Sid Hickox)
 
Film Editing by
David Weisbart 
 
Art Direction by
Charles H. Clarke 
 
Set Decoration by
William L. Kuehl  (as William Kuehl)
 
Makeup Department
Perc Westmore .... makeup artist
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Richard Maybery .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Dolph Thomas .... sound
 
Special Effects by
Hans F. Koenekamp .... special effects photography (as H.F. Koenekamp)
 
Stunts
Bob Morgan .... stunts (uncredited)
Allen Pomeroy .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Bernard Newman .... wardrobe
 
Music Department
Leo F. Forbstein .... musical director
Leonid Raab .... orchestral arrangements
Max Steiner .... composer: additional music (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
106 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Certification:
Argentina:Atp | Australia:PG | Canada:PG (video rating) | Finland:K-16 | Netherlands:18 (original rating) (1948) | Norway:16 | UK:15 (1988) | UK:A (1947) (cut) | USA:Approved (PCA #12248) | West Germany:16 (nf)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
There is an 8x10 photo shown in the film of Humphrey Bogart's character before his face surgery. The actor's face in the photo is of character actor Frank Wilcox.See more »
Goofs:
Errors made by characters (possibly deliberate errors by the filmmakers): The blackmailer advises Parry to escape to Mexico via a small border town called Benton, Arizona. The correct name is Benson.See more »
Quotes:
Irene Jansen:I thought I had a good life here... but your going away doesn't make it seem good anymore. I've sort of joined your team and... and I don't look forward to being without you.
Vincent Parry:When I leave here, you're off my team, and lucky to be. Nah, I've got the Indian sign on me. It seems I can't win.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
AvalonSee more »

FAQ

Is 'Dark Passage' based on a book?
How does the movie end?
How much sex, violence, and profanity are in this movie?
See more »
65 out of 78 people found the following review useful.
You're too marvelous, too marvelous for words...., 22 May 2005
Author: jotix100 from New York

"Dark Passage" offers a different take on the San Francisco noir genre. This is a movie in which we get to know about the story that unfolds in front of us told in narrative style by the hero, who is never seen until about one hour into the picture. Delmer Daves, adapting the David Goodis novel has created something seldom seen in this type of films, in which, the hero's presence is required at all times.

The film has a great style, as it offers a view of the San Francisco of the 1940s in ways that hadn't been seen before. The director was lucky to be able to open up the book in excellent ways to keep the viewer hooked from the start. The 'moderne' style of that era is seen in glorious detail, especially Irene's apartment, where much of the action takes place. The effect of the glassed enclosed elevator makes a dramatic contribution to the look of this movie.

The story of an innocent man, falsely condemned to prison for killing his own wife, parallels other movies. What's unusual here is that the presence of this convict is seen in another light with his own slant in to what really happened to the dead woman. There are other elements in the film that make it appealing. as the relationship between the escaped man, Vincent Parry, and the woman who rescues him, Irene Jansen.

Sidney Hickox's stylish cinematography is one of the best assets of the film. The crisp images that one sees of the city, or the surrounding areas, add to the enjoyment of watching the mystery unfold. The mood is set by the swing music of the time as Frank Waxman's score is heard. Richard Whiting contributes the great song one hears in the background.

The film is dominated by Humphrey Bogart, which says a lot about his power as an actor, and as a personality. When one considers he is actually not seen completely until after an hour into the movie, it speaks volumes of how the actor and the director were able to pull it through. The Irene Jansen of Lauren Bacall is another of the things that work in the film. Ms. Bacall's radiant beauty dominates every scene she is in. This actress had such a style that no matter what she is doing, she pulls our attention to her. The camera loved Ms. Bacall.

The other best thing going for the film is the strong performances Mr. Daves has obtained from his cast. Agnes Moorehead makes a phenomenal appearance as the evil Madge Rapf. Her last scene with Mr. Bogart stands as one of the best moments in a film noir of the era. Ms. Moorehead's expressions as she is confronted with the facts, keep on changing as she absorbs everything being thrown at her. Clifton Young who plays Baker, the opportunistic would be criminal, is also effective, as he adds a layer of intrigue with an angle we didn't figure out existed. His fight with Parry at the bottom of the Golden Gate bridge is beautifully choreographed. Finally, the kind cab driver Sam, who helps Parry assume a new identity, as played by Tom D'Andrea is one of the highlights of the film, as well as the plastic surgeon, portrayed by Houseley Stevenson.

This film, while not perfect, shows how well Delmer Dave's gamble paid in his conception for the film.

Was the above review useful to you?
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Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for Dark Passage (1947)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Irene's Apartment + Other Settings Ariane1998
Time for a remake? Jack_and_Pike
Something has always bothered me about this film mryerson
Vincent's POV arms jonkennedy
did anyone else think Agnes Moorehead was kinda hot? beavertoof
Don't Get Me Wrong, I Loved It, BUT... jmiller1918
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