7.4/10
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Brighton Rock (1947)

Pinkie Brown is a small-town hoodlum whose gang runs a protection racket based at Brighton race course. When Pinkie orders the murder of a rival, Fred, the police believe it to be suicide. ... See full summary »

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Writers:

(from the novel by), (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Virginia Winter ...
Reginald Purdell ...
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Charles Goldner ...
Alan Wheatley ...
Carol Marsh ...
Lina Barrie ...
Molly
Joan Sterndale-Bennett ...
Delia
Harry Ross ...
Brewer

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Storyline

Pinkie Brown is a small-town hoodlum whose gang runs a protection racket based at Brighton race course. When Pinkie orders the murder of a rival, Fred, the police believe it to be suicide. This doesn't convince Ida Arnold, who was with Fred just before he died, and she sets out to find the truth. She comes across naive waitress Rose, who can prove that Fred was murdered. In an attempt to keep Rose quiet Pinkie marries her. But with his gang beginning to doubt his ability, and his rivals taking over his business, Pinkie starts to become more desperate and violent. Written by measham

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Raw! Brutal! Razor Gangs in Action! See more »

Genres:

Crime | Drama | Film-Noir

Certificate:

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Details

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Release Date:

12 December 1947 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

Brighton Rock  »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$10,626 (USA) (19 June 2009)

Gross:

$223,887 (USA) (28 October 2011)
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Company Credits

Production Co:

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Although Graham Greene detested the film's more upbeat ending that he helped craft in order to get past censorship restrictions, he had nothing but praise for Richard Attenborough's interpretation of Pinky. See more »

Goofs

As Fred Hale (Alan Wheatley) makes his abortive run away from Pinkie's gang to the railway station in the centre of Brighton, when he sees his way blocked he turns and catches a number 40 bus leaving from the bus stand. The next shot shows the bus leaving - except that it's now a number 6. See more »

Quotes

Mother Superior: [while comforting Rose after Pinkie's death] You or I cannot fathom the appalling strangeness of the mercy of God.
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Crazy Credits

Opening credits: Brighton today is a large, jolly, friendly seaside town in Sussex, exactly one hour's journey from London. But in the years between the two wars, behind the Regency terraces and crowded beaches, there was another Brighton of dark alleyways and festering slums. From here, the poison of crime and violence and gang warfare began to spread, until the challenge was taken up by the Police. This is a story of that other Brighton - now happily no more. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Countdown: Episode #71.108 (2014) See more »

Soundtracks

Hello Hello!
(uncredited)
Music by John Addison
Lyrics by Gerard Bryant
Sung by Hermione Baddeley and the promenade employees
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User Reviews

 
Great Britsh Noir
27 January 2007 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

I just saw this picture courtesy of a local rental store which has a number of Btitish films otherwise not available. Wow!

Absolutely excellent in all departments. Attenborough gives a standout performance as Pinky and is surrounded by a sterling cast working at the same high level. The film is beautifully photographed in a way which gives texture to the story and reality to the characters. This must be one of the top British films of the Forties and can stand beside anything Hollywood was doing at the time (or any time for that matter.)

The script is credited to Graham Greene (based on his Novel) and, the unlikely seeming, Terence Rattigan (Separate Tables, Winslow Boy et al). Without knowing who contributed what to the final screenplay, I can say that it is a beautiful and coherent piece of work that has character development as well as terse and atmospheric dialog that keeps the viewer engrossed and the tension high.

Recommended (especially to fans of film noir)


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