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Fantasia 2017 Review: King Cohen and the Art of the Steal

"Anybody will put up with anything if they think a movie is being shot." These are words of wisdom, but also kind of a guerrilla filmmaking mission statement, from filmmaker Larry Cohen. Steve Mitchell's King Cohen offers a breathless sprint through the writer-director-producer's prolific 'lets just shoot the damn movie!' ethos, from writing for NBC's Kraft Theatre in the era of live television in the late 1950s through episodic shows like The Fugitive and Branded -- "The bulk of the series, Dude" -- in the 1960s to directing racy social commentary (Bone, Black Caesar, God Told Me To, The Private Lives of J. Edgar Hoover) in the 1970s and gonzo genre-mashing creature features in the 1980s (Q: The Winged Serpent, The Stuff), before finally settling with writing mid-tier Hollywood...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

John Williams To Receive 44th AFI Life Achievement Award

©Todd Rosenberg Photography 2009

The American Film Institute (AFI) Board of Trustees announced today that esteemed composer John Williams will be the recipient of the 44th AFI Life Achievement Award, America’s highest honor for a career in film. For the first time in AFI history, the award will be bestowed upon a composer. Williams will be honored at a gala Tribute on June 9, 2016 in Los Angeles, CA.

The AFI Life Achievement Award Tribute special will return for its fourth year with Turner Broadcasting to air on TNT in late June 2016, followed by an encore presentation on its sister network, Turner Classic Movies (TCM).

Most recently, the 43rd AFI Life Achievement Award Tribute brought together the film community to honor Steve Martin.

John Williams has written the soundtrack to our lives,” said Sir Howard Stringer, Chair, AFI Board of Trustees. “Note by note, through chord and chorus, his genius for marrying
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

‘Young Dr. Malone’ Actor John P. Connell Dies at 91

‘Young Dr. Malone’ Actor John P. Connell Dies at 91
John P. Connell, best known as the star of the daytime drama “Young Dr. Malone,” died Thursday in Woodland Hills. He was 91.

Born in Philadelphia, Connell received five battle stars and a Purple Heart during World War II. He was a radio operator and waist gunner aboard a B-24 crew which completed 43 bombing missions.

He broke into show business on Broadway in “Time Limit” and “Uncle Willie” and with the national company of “Picnic.” Connell worked on dozens of live TV broadcasts, including “Studio One in Hollywood,” “Kraft Theatre,” “You Are There,” and “Goodyear Playhouse” and starred for five years as Dr. David Malone on “Young Dr. Malone.”

He also collaborated with his wife Mila to write more than 100 “Secret Storm” scripts. Connell’s film work included “Three Days of the Condor,” “Family Business” and “Fail Safe.”

Connell also became a ubiquitous radio and television spokesman for hundreds of sponsors.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Theodore Bikel, ‘Fiddler on the Roof’ Star, Dies at 91

Theodore Bikel, ‘Fiddler on the Roof’ Star, Dies at 91
Oscar- and Tony-nominated character actor and folk singer Theodore Bikel, who originated the role of Captain von Trapp in “The Sound of Music” on Broadway and starred in “Fiddler on the Roof” onstage in thousands of performances, died Tuesday morning in Los Angeles. He was 91.

To some, he is best known for his 1990 appearance on “Star Trek: The Next Generation” as the Russian adopted father of the Klingon Worf.

Bikel did his first bigscreen work in John Huston’s 1951 classic “The African Queen” and Huston’s “Moulin Rouge.” After acting in a series of English films, he did supporting work in two high-profile pics in 1957: historical epic “The Pride and the Passion,” starring Cary Grant, Frank Sinatra and Sophia Loren, and “The Enemy Below,” a WWII submarine thriller starring Robert Mitchum.

He often played Germans or Russians — in his autobiography, Bikel said that his facility with accents resulted in
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Theodore Bikel, ‘Fiddler on the Roof’ Star, Dies at 91

Theodore Bikel, ‘Fiddler on the Roof’ Star, Dies at 91
Oscar- and Tony-nominated character actor and folk singer Theodore Bikel, who originated the role of Captain von Trapp in “The Sound of Music” on Broadway and starred in “Fiddler on the Roof” onstage in thousands of performances, died Tuesday morning in Los Angeles. He was 91.

In a statement Tuesday, Actors’ Equity Association said it “mourns the passing of our dear friend, our brother and former President Theo Bikel. From the time he joined Equity in 1954, Bikel has been an advocate for the members of our union and his extraordinary achievements paved the way for so many. No one loved theater more, his union better or cherished actors like Theo did. He has left an indelible mark on generation of members past and generations of members to come. We thank you, Theo, for all you have done.”

To some, he is best known for his 1990 appearance on “Star Trek: The Next Generation
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Rip Betsy Palmer Aka Pamela Voorhees of Friday the 13th

Its a nasty blow to not only the horror community but the world. The woman revolutionized the obsessive mother But long before that she thrilled viewers with appearances in such hit shows as Kraft Theatre Studio One in Hollywood and Appointment with Adventure. She also showed her acting chops in flicks like The Last Angry Man It Happened to Jane and The Tin Star.
See full article at Best-Horror-Movies.com »

Friday the 13th actress Betsy Palmer has died at the age of 88

Friday the 13th actress Betsy Palmer has died at the age of 88
Friday the 13th star Betsy Palmer has died at the age of 88.

The actress was best known for her performance as killer cook Mrs Voorhees in the 1980 horror film and its 1981 sequel.

Her manager Brad Lemack informed The AP on Sunday (May 31) that she died of natural causes at a hospice in Connecticut.

In addition to her most famous role, Palmer appeared in TV dramas like Kraft Theatre, Studio One and Murder, She Wrote. She also appeared in The Long Gray Lane, Queen Bee and The Tin Star on the big screen.

Palmer was also known for her Broadway performances, and appeared in several plays during her long career, including Same Time, Next Year and Cactus Flower.

Looking back on Friday the 13th in the years that followed, Palmer was not afraid to share her true feelings about the film, describing the script as a "piece of junk".

The actress
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Actress Betsy Palmer from Friday The 13th Dead at 88

“You see, Jason was my son, and today is his birthday…”

The woman had a long and distinguished career including hundreds of TV appearances in the 1950s and ’60s, but she will always best known as Jason’s mom in the original Friday The 13th (1980). Betsy Palmer was a regular on the horror convention circuit and a good attitude about her place in horror film history. She said in an interview once: “If it was good enough for Boris Karloff, why should I complain?” Betsy Palmer died Friday of natural causes at a hospital in Los Angeles.

From The Associated Press:

Betsy Palmer, the veteran character actress who achieved lasting, though not necessarily sought-after, fame as the murderous camp cook in the cheesy horror film “Friday the 13th,” has died at age 88.

Palmer died Friday of natural causes at a hospice care center in Connecticut, her longtime manager, Brad Lemack,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Betsy von Furstenberg, Actress and Aristocrat, Dies at 83

Betsy von Furstenberg, an elegant star of Broadway during the 1950s who also made appearances in early television and on daytime soaps, died April 21 from complications of Alzheimer’s disease in Manhattan. She was 83.

The stylish actress played a series of debutantes and society girls onstage. She made a big impression playing Myra Hagerman in Edward Chodorov’s original comedy “Oh, Men! Oh, Women!” on Broadway in 1953. (Barbara Rush played the role in the 1957 feature adaptation). During the decade she enjoyed success on the Rialto in plays including “The Chalk Garden,” “Child of Fortune,” “Nature’s Way” and a revival of “Much Ado About Nothing,”

She made her screen debut in director Géza von Radványi’s 1950 Italian war drama “Women Without Names.” During the 1950s she appeared in a number of episodic anthology shows beginning with “Starlight Theatre” in 1951 and also including “Playhouse 90,” “Pulitzer Prize Theatre,” “Armstrong Circle Theatre” and “Kraft Theatre.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Gene Saks, Director of Neil Simon on Stage and Screen, Dies at 93

Gene Saks, Director of Neil Simon on Stage and Screen, Dies at 93
Gene Saks, who helmed many Neil Simon plays on Broadway and won three Tonys — for the Cy Coleman-Michael Stewart musical “I Love My Wife” plus Simon’s “Brighton Beach Memoirs” and “Biloxi Blues” — died Saturday. He was 93.

His wife, Keren, told the New York Times that he died from pneumonia in his East Hampton, N.Y. home.

Saks directed only seven feature films, all of them based on legit works. They included Simon adaptations “The Odd Couple,” “Barefoot in the Park,” “Last of the Red Hot Lovers” and “Brighton Beach Memoirs.” He also directed the 1969 “Cactus Flower,” which earned Goldie Hawn an Oscar for supporting actress.

After helming the hit Broadway musical “Mame,” Saks did the big screen version in 1974. For the film, Lucille Ball played the title character, with many critics complaining that Angela Lansbury could repeat her Broadway triumph. Both the stage and screen versions of
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Gene Saks, Director of Neil Simon on Stage and Screen, Dies at 93

Gene Saks, Director of Neil Simon on Stage and Screen, Dies at 93
Gene Saks, who helmed many Neil Simon plays on Broadway and won three Tonys — for the Cy Coleman-Michael Stewart musical “I Love My Wife” plus Simon’s “Brighton Beach Memoirs” and “Biloxi Blues” — died Saturday. He was 93.

His wife, Keren, told the New York Times that he died from pneumonia in his East Hampton, N.Y. home.

Saks directed only seven feature films, all of them based on legit works. They included Simon adaptations “The Odd Couple,” “Barefoot in the Park,” “Last of the Red Hot Lovers” and “Brighton Beach Memoirs.” He also directed the 1969 “Cactus Flower,” which earned Goldie Hawn an Oscar for supporting actress.

After helming the hit Broadway musical “Mame,” Saks did the big screen version in 1974. For the film, Lucille Ball played the title character, with many critics complaining that Angela Lansbury could repeat her Broadway triumph. Both the stage and screen versions of
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Coca-Cola Ends Sponsorship Of ‘American Idol’ (Exclusive)

Coca-Cola Ends Sponsorship Of ‘American Idol’ (Exclusive)
Coke adds life, or so a popular 1976 ad slogan for the popular soda once bragged. It has certainly done just that for “American Idol,” the venerable Fox program that has long featured big cups festooned with logos for various drinks made by Coca-Cola laid out on its judges’ table. What Coke adds, however, it can also take away.

After more than a decade as one of the top sponsors of “Idol,” Coca-Cola is cutting ties to the program, the company said in a statement. Coca-Cola will instead work with Fox in other ways. “After 13 years, we feel it is the right time for the Coca-Cola brand to venture into new spaces and pursue other opportunities to connect with teens and leverage music as a passion point,” the Atlanta beverage company responded when asked why it was leaving the show.

Coca-Cola departs as Madison Avenue has noticeably cut its support of “American Idol,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Inside the Writers’ Room: Post #14: The Revolution is Loading

A few weeks ago HBO and then CBS announced that they would launch stand-alone online services in U.S. in 2015. Before that, Netflix had made known that it would start producing features, crushing theatrical release windows once and for all, after it had contributed to the change of the patterns of attention and the way TV series are made by releasing its House of Cards episodes all at once, as a 13-hour movie. ‘Now the real shakeout begins’, wrote Ted Hope in Hollywood Reporter. ‘We are witnessing the march from once lucrative legacy practices built around titles to a new focus on community.’ Michael Wolff, writing also in the Hollywood Reporter, disagrees: ‘Streaming services from the two networks don’t signal television’s capitulation to Netflix and the web; it’s actually the opposite, as the medium expands yet again to gobble up more revenue.’ And in that sense, he says,
See full article at Hope for Film »

Television Academy Lauds Casting Director Marion Dougherty with Governors Award

The late casting director Marion Dougherty will be awarded the Television Academy’s 2014 Governors Award.

Dougherty will be feted for her more than 50-year legacy as a casting director in film and television, starting with NBC’s “Kraft Television Theatre.” She is credited with coining the term “casting director” and for giving early breaks to such notables as Dustin Hoffman, William Shatner, Glenn Close and Christopher Walken.

Dougherty, who died in 2011, was the subject of the 2012 HBO docu “Casting By.”

The TV Academy also announced the juried award winners for outstanding costumes for a variety program or special and outstanding individual achievement in animation. These categories do not have nominations, and winners are voted on by a panel of specialists in the respective disciplines.

The awards will be presented during the Creative Arts Emmy Awards on August 16.

Outstanding Costumes For A Variety Program Or A Special

Saturday Night Live • Host:
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Casting Director Marion Dougherty to Receive Posthumous Emmy

Casting Director Marion Dougherty to Receive Posthumous Emmy
Veteran casting director Marion Dougherty will posthumously receive the 2014 Governors Award from the Television Academy at the Aug. 24 Creative Arts Emmy Awards, the Academy announced on Thursday. Dougherty's pioneering work in the casting industry made her the subject of the 2012 Emmy-nominated documentary “Casting By,” which premiered on HBO. She began serving as a casting director in 1949 with the NBC series “Kraft Television Theatre” and worked on shows that included “Naked City,” “Route 66” and “All in the Family.” Dougherty, who was among the early champions for such actors as Robert Duvall, Warren Beatty and Jack Lemmon, died...
See full article at The Wrap »

Al Ruscio, Character Actor and Acting Teacher, Dies at 89

Al Ruscio, a film, television and stage actor who was also a noted acting teacher and served on the board of directors of the Screen Actors Guild, died in his home on Nov. 12. He was 89.

Ruscio was already an accomplished actor by the time he arrived in Hollywood, soon after which he starred in “A View From the Bridge” at the Players Ring Theater. He also began to play major guest roles on series including “Bonanza,” “Mr. Lucky,” “The Untouchables” and “Playhouse 90,” and he appeared in the film “Al Capone” with Rod Steiger.

During this time, he was serving on SAG’s board of directors. He began touring in George Bernard Shaw’s “Don Juan in Hell,” playing the role of the Devil.

Ruscio’s career took a bit of a left turn at this point as he became actor-in-residence, chairman of the theater department and managing director of
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Al Ruscio, Character Actor and Acting Teacher, Dies at 89

Al Ruscio, a film, television and stage actor who was also a noted acting teacher and served on the board of directors of the Screen Actors Guild, died in his home on Nov. 12. He was 89.

Ruscio was already an accomplished actor by the time he arrived in Hollywood, soon after which he starred in “A View From the Bridge” at the Players Ring Theater. He also began to play major guest roles on series including “Bonanza,” “Mr. Lucky,” “The Untouchables” and “Playhouse 90,” and he appeared in the film “Al Capone” with Rod Steiger.

During this time, he was serving on SAG’s board of directors. He began touring in George Bernard Shaw’s “Don Juan in Hell,” playing the role of the Devil.

Ruscio’s career took a bit of a left turn at this point as he became actor-in-residence, chairman of the theater department and managing director of
See full article at Variety - TV News »

All Movie Fans Need to Watch HBO’s ‘Casting By’

One of the best anecdotes in the documentary Casting By, which premieres tonight on HBO, relates the start of Warren Beatty’s screen career on a 1957 episode of Kraft Television Theatre. We’re told that like many young actors of the time he modeled himself way too much on Marlon Brando. Then we actually see a clip, and sure enough the future movie star looks and sounds like he’s doing a comical impersonation. Fortunately, within the next five years he would find his own comfortable style and manage to break out in Hollywood in order to become one of his generation’s finest. And apparently we have casting director Marion Dougherty to thank for giving him his first shot. There are a lot of first- and second-hand stories in the film about a lot of actors and actresses’ beginnings. And a lot of rare clips to prove just how terrible or terrific they really were. There
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Jack Klugman obituary

Actor who won fame as Oscar Madison in The Odd Couple and crimesolving medical examiner Quincy

Television was the medium that conferred stardom on the actor Jack Klugman, who has died aged 90. In a long, distinguished career that also embraced theatre and film, he was principally identified with two television characters: Oscar Madison, the slovenly, down-to-earth, cigar-smoking flatmate of the neurotically neat Felix Unger (Tony Randall) in the long-running comedy series The Odd Couple (1970-75; in the play and film, Felix's surname was spelt Ungar), and Quincy in Quincy, Me (1976-83), a crime-solving medical examiner.

Born in a poor neighbourhood of Philadelphia, the son of Russian-Jewish immigrants, Klugman had a tough childhood. His father, a house painter, died young, forcing his mother to make hats in her kitchen to buy food and clothing for her six children. Young Jack, who worked as a street peddler, later observed: "Poverty can teach lessons that privilege cannot.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Jack Klugman obituary

Actor who won fame as Oscar Madison in The Odd Couple and crimesolving medical examiner Quincy

Television was the medium that conferred stardom on the actor Jack Klugman, who has died aged 90. In a long, distinguished career that also embraced theatre and film, he was principally identified with two television characters: Oscar Madison, the slovenly, down-to-earth, cigar-smoking flatmate of the neurotically neat Felix Unger (Tony Randall) in the long-running comedy series The Odd Couple (1970-75; in the play and film, Felix's surname was spelt Ungar), and Quincy in Quincy, Me (1976-83), a crime-solving medical examiner.

Born in a poor neighbourhood of Philadelphia, the son of Russian-Jewish immigrants, Klugman had a tough childhood. His father, a house painter, died young, forcing his mother to make hats in her kitchen to buy food and clothing for her six children. Young Jack, who worked as a street peddler, later observed: "Poverty can teach lessons that privilege cannot.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »
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