IMDb > Ziegfeld Follies (1945)
Ziegfeld Follies
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Ziegfeld Follies (1945) More at IMDbPro »


Overview

User Rating:
6.6/10   1,817 votes »
Your Rating:
Saving vote...
Deleting vote...
/10   (delete | history)
Sorry, there was a problem
MOVIEmeter: ?
Down 1% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Writers:
David Freedman (written by) (segment)
Hugh Martin (written by) (segment) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Ziegfeld Follies on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
8 April 1946 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Flashing...smashing SCREEN ENTERTAINMENT! DAZZLING IN ITS BEAUTY...PACKED WITH GLORIOUS Melodies! (original print media ad - many caps) See more »
Plot:
The late, great impresario Florenz Ziegfeld looks down from heaven and ordains a new revue in his grand old style. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Awards:
1 win See more »
User Reviews:
A Drop-Dead Gorgeous Show For The Serious Musical Fan See more (39 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Fred Astaire ... Fred Astaire ('Here's to the Ladies') / Raffles ('This Heart of Mine') / Tai Long ('Limehouse Blues') / Gentleman ('The Babbit and the Bromide')

Lucille Ball ... Lucille Ball ('Here's to the Ladies')
Lucille Bremer ... Princess ('This Heart of Mine') / Moy Ling in 'Limehouse Blues')

Fanny Brice ... Norma Edelman ('A Sweepstakes Ticket')

Judy Garland ... The Star ('A Great Lady Has An Interview')

Kathryn Grayson ... Kathryn Grayson ('Beauty')

Lena Horne ... Lena Horne ('Love')

Gene Kelly ... Gentleman ('The Babbit and the Bromide')
James Melton ... Alfredo ('La Traviata')
Victor Moore ... Lawyer's Client ('Pay the Two Dollars')

Red Skelton ... J. Newton Numbskull ('When Television Comes')

Esther Williams ... Esther Williams ('A Water Ballet')

William Powell ... Florenz Ziegfeld Jr.

Edward Arnold ... Lawyer ('Pay the Two Dollars')
Marion Bell ... Violetta ('La Traviata')

Cyd Charisse ... Ballerina ('Beauty')

Hume Cronyn ... Monty ('A Sweepstakes Ticket')

William Frawley ... Martin ('A Sweepstakes Ticket')
Robert Lewis ... Chinese Gentleman ('Limehouse Blues' / Telephone Voice ('Number Please')

Virginia O'Brien ... Virginia O'Brien ('Here's to the Ladies')

Keenan Wynn ... Caller ('Number Please')
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Bunin's Puppets ... Puppets
Rod Alexander ... Chorus Boy (uncredited)
Robert Ames ... Masked Man ('Limehouse Blues') (uncredited)
Gloria Joy Arden ... Dancer (uncredited)
Jean Ashton ... Dancer (uncredited)
Irene Austin ... Dancer (uncredited)
William Bailey ... Subway Passenger ('Pay the Two Dollars') (uncredited)
Juliette Ball ... Club Patron ('Love') (uncredited)
Bonnie Barlowe ... Dancer (uncredited)
James Barron ... Couple with Banners in 'Limehouse Blues' (uncredited)
Eleanor Bayley ... Couple with Branches in 'Limehouse Blues' (uncredited)
Judi Blacque ... Dancer (uncredited)
Lennie Bluett ... Dancer ('Love') (uncredited)
Karin Booth ... Ziegfeld Girl (uncredited)
Norman Borine ... Dancer (uncredited)
Helen Boyce ... Countess ('This Heart of Mine') (uncredited)
Hazel Brooks ... Dancer (uncredited)
Ed Brown ... Dancer (uncredited)
Marie Bryant ... Woman Getting Her Man Taken in ('Love') (uncredited)
Kathleen Cartmill ... Dancer (uncredited)
Lucille Casey ... Ziegfeld Girl (uncredited)
Jack Cavan ... Dancer (uncredited)
Elise Cavanna ... Tall Woman (uncredited)
Feodor Chaliapin Jr. ... Lieutenant ('This Heart of Mine') (uncredited)
Naomi Childers ... Duchess ('This Heart of Mine') (uncredited)
Milton Chisholm ... Chorus Boy (uncredited)
Marilyn Christine ... Dancer (uncredited)
Charles Coleman ... Majordomo ('This Heart of Mine') (uncredited)
Aina Constant ... Ziegfeld Girl (uncredited)
Laura Corbay ... Dancer (uncredited)
Joseph Crehan ... 1st Judge ('Pay the Two Dollars') (uncredited)
Dick D'Arcy ... Chorus Boy (uncredited)
William B. Davidson ... 2nd Judge ('Pay the Two Dollars') (uncredited)
Jack Deery ... Man (uncredited)
Dante DiPaolo ... Chorus Boy (uncredited)
Frances Donelan ... Ziegfeld Girl (uncredited)

Natalie Draper ... Ziegfeld Girl (uncredited)
Eddie Dunn ... 3rd Subway Policeman ('Pay the Two Dollars') (uncredited)
Rita Dunn ... Dancer (uncredited)
Meredyth Durrell ... Dancer (uncredited)
Mary Jo Ellis ... Couple with Banners in 'Limehouse Blues' (uncredited)
Rex Evans ... Butler ('A Great Lady Has An Interview') (uncredited)
Shawn Ferguson ... Dancer (uncredited)
Sam Flint ... Majordomo's Assistant ('This Heart of Mine') (uncredited)
Jeanne Francis ... Dancer (uncredited)
Sean Francis ... Ensemble in 'Limehouse Blues' (uncredited)
Jean French ... Dancer (uncredited)
Mary Jane French ... Dancer (uncredited)
Sam Garrett ... Roping / Twirling Act (uncredited)
Karen X. Gaylord ... Ziegfeld Girl (uncredited)
Sidney Gordon ... Masked Man ('This Heart of Mine') (uncredited)
David Gray ... Dancer (uncredited)
Aileen Haley ... Ziegfeld Girl (uncredited)
Carol Haney ... Ziegfeld Girl (uncredited)
Suzette Harbin ... Flirt ('Love') (uncredited)
Avanelle Harris ... Club Patron ('Love') (uncredited)
Maggie Hathaway ... Dancer ('Love') (uncredited)
Charles Hawkins ... Club Patron ('Love') (uncredited)
Bill Hawley ... Dancer (uncredited)
Harry Hayden ... Warden ('Pay the Two Dollars') (uncredited)
Doreen Hayward ... Dancer (uncredited)
Cleo Herndon ... Dancer ('Love') (uncredited)
George Hill ... 2nd Subway Policeman ('Pay the Two Dollars') (uncredited)
Shirlee Howard ... Ziegfeld Girl (uncredited)
Don Hulbert ... Chorus Boy (uncredited)
Charlotte Hunter ... Dancer (uncredited)
Virginia Hunter ... Dancer (uncredited)
Patricia Jackson ... Dancer (uncredited)
Margaret Kays ... Dancer (uncredited)
James King ... Rooster ('Limehouse Blues') (uncredited)
Laura Knight ... Dancer (uncredited)
Laura Lane ... Dancer (uncredited)

Peter Lawford ... Porky ('Number Please') (voice) (uncredited)
Harriet Lee ... Bar Singer ('Limehouse Blues') (uncredited)
Dale Lefler ... Dancer (uncredited)
Eugene Loring ... Costermonger ('Limehouse Blues') (uncredited)
Charles Lunard ... Masked Man ('Limehouse Blues') (uncredited)
Herb Lurie ... Chorus Boy (uncredited)
Patricia Lynn ... Ensemble in 'Limehouse Blues' (uncredited)
Wilbur Mack ... Subway Passenger ('Pay the Two Dollars') (uncredited)
Melvin Martin ... Dancer (uncredited)
Matt Mattox ... Chorus Boy (uncredited)
Bert May ... Chorus Boy (uncredited)
Diane Meredith ... Dancer (uncredited)
Ruth Merman ... Ensemble in 'Limehouse Blues' (uncredited)
Lorraine Miller ... Dancer (uncredited)
Joyce Murray ... Dancer (uncredited)
Janet Nevis ... Dancer (uncredited)
Ray Nyles ... Dancer (uncredited)
Helen O'Hara ... Ziegfeld Girl (uncredited)
Billy O'Shay ... Dancer (uncredited)
Garry Owen ... 1st Subway Policeman ('Limehouse Blues') (uncredited)
Jack Purcell ... Chorus Boy (uncredited)

Tommy Rall ... Chorus Boy (uncredited)
Ellen Ray ... Couple with Parasols in 'Limehouse Blues' (uncredited)
Jane Ray ... Dancer (uncredited)
Dorothy Raye ... Dancer (uncredited)
Jack Regas ... Masked Man ('Limehouse Blues') (uncredited)
Beth Renner ... Dancer (uncredited)
Ricky Ricardi ... Chorus Boy (uncredited)
Alex Romero ... Chorus Boy (uncredited)
Noreen Roth ... Ziegfeld Girl (uncredited)
Billy Shead ... Couple with Parasols in 'Limehouse Blues' (uncredited)
Elaine Shepard ... Ziegfeld Girl (uncredited)
Silver ... Horse in 'Here's to the Girls' (uncredited)
Melba Snowden ... Dancer (uncredited)
Walter Stane ... Dancer (uncredited)
Ronald Stanton ... Couple with Branches in 'Limehouse Blues' (uncredited)
Ivon Starr ... Dancer (uncredited)
Larry Steers ... Magistrate ('Pay the Two Dollars') (uncredited)
Count Stefenelli ... Count ('This Heart of Mine') (uncredited)
Wanda Stevenson ... Ensemble in 'Limehouse Blues' (uncredited)
Grady Sutton ... Texan ('Number Please') (uncredited)

Ray Teal ... 2nd Subway Policeman ('Limehouse Blues') (uncredited)
Audrey Totter ... Phone Operator ('Number Please') (voice) (uncredited)
Robert Trout ... Dancer (uncredited)
Dorothy Van Nuys ... Ziegfeld Girl (uncredited)
Arthur Walsh ... Telegraph Boy ('A Sweepstakes Ticket') (uncredited)
Robert Wayne ... Dyseptic ('This Heart of Mine') (uncredited)
Eve Whitney ... Ziegfeld Girl (uncredited)
Kay Williams ... Girl ('Number Please') / Ziegfeld Girl (uncredited)

Directed by
Lemuel Ayers (segment "Love")
Roy Del Ruth (segment "A Sweepstakes Ticket")
Robert Lewis (segment "Number Please")
Vincente Minnelli (segments "This Heart of Mine", "Limehouse Blues", "A Great Lady Has an Interview", "The Babbitt and the Bromide" and "Beauty")
George Sidney (segments "Here's to the Girls", "Pay the Two Dollars" and "When Television Comes")
Merrill Pye (segment "A Water Ballet") (uncredited)
Charles Walters (segment: "A Great Lady Has an Interview") (uncredited)
 
Writing credits
David Freedman (written by) (segment "A Sweepstakes Ticket")

Hugh Martin (written by) (segment "Love") and
Ralph Blane (written by) (segment "Love")

John Murray Anderson  uncredited
Lemuel Ayers  uncredited
Peter Barr  written by (segment "Number Please") (uncredited)
Guy Bolton  uncredited
Allen Boretz  uncredited
Irving Brecher  written by (segment "The Babbitt and the Bromide") (uncredited)
Eddie Cantor  uncredited
Erik Charell  uncredited
Harry Crane  uncredited
Roger Edens  uncredited
Joseph Erens  uncredited
Devery Freeman  uncredited
Everett Freeman  uncredited
E.Y. Harburg  uncredited
Lou Holtz  uncredited
Cal Howard  uncredited
Al Lewis  writer "Ziegfeld Days" sketch (segment "Bunin's Puppets") (uncredited)
Robert Lewis  uncredited
Max Liebman  uncredited
Eugene Loring  uncredited
Wilkie C. Mahoney  uncredited
Jack McGowan  uncredited
William Noble  uncredited
James O'Hanlon  uncredited
Samson Raphaelson  uncredited
Philip Rapp  uncredited
William Schorr  uncredited
Joseph Schrank  uncredited
Edna Skelton  segment "When Television Comes" (uncredited)
Red Skelton  segment "When Television Comes" (uncredited)
Frank Sullivan  uncredited
Kay Thompson  uncredited
Harry Tugend  written by (segment "When Television Comes") (uncredited)
Charles Walters  uncredited
William K. Wells  written by (segment "Pay the Two Dollars") (uncredited)
George White  written by (segment "Pay the Two Dollars") (uncredited)
Edgar Allan Woolf  uncredited

Produced by
Arthur Freed .... producer
 
Original Music by
Roger Edens (uncredited)
Lennie Hayton (uncredited)
Conrad Salinger (uncredited)
 
Cinematography by
George J. Folsey (director of photography) (as George Folsey)
Charles Rosher (director of photography)
Ray June (uncredited)
 
Film Editing by
Albert Akst 
 
Art Direction by
Cedric Gibbons 
Merrill Pye 
Jack Martin Smith 
Lemuel Ayers (uncredited)
Edward C. Carfagno (uncredited)
Harry McAfee (uncredited)
 
Set Decoration by
Edwin B. Willis 
 
Costume Design by
Helen Rose 
Tony Duquette (uncredited)
Irene (uncredited)
 
Makeup Department
Jack Dawn .... makeup artist
Sydney Guilaroff .... hair stylist
Dorothy Ponedel .... key makeup artist (uncredited)
 
Production Management
Gilbert Kurland .... unit manager (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Jack Greenwood .... assistant director
Al Shenberg .... assistant director
Lou Bunin .... assistant director (uncredited)
Arvid Griffin .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Mac Alper .... associate set decorator
William Ferrari .... art director: puppet sequence
Irene Sharaff .... art director: "Limehouse Blues" sequence (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Douglas Shearer .... recording director
Joe Edmondson .... unit mixer (uncredited)
William Steinkamp .... re-recording and effects mixer (uncredited)
Michael Steinore .... re-recording and effects mixer (uncredited)
John A. Williams .... re-recording and effects mixer (uncredited)
 
Visual Effects by
Mark Davis .... matte paintings camera (uncredited)
A. Arnold Gillespie .... miniatures (uncredited)
A. Arnold Gillespie .... transparency projection shots (uncredited)
Warren Newcombe .... matte paintings (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Robert J. Bronner .... first assistant camera (segment "When Television Comes") (uncredited)
John M. Nickolaus Jr. .... second camera operator (uncredited)
Sidney Wagner .... photographer (uncredited)
 
Animation Department
Lou Bunin .... animator
Lou Chuten .... animation supervisor (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Irene .... costume supervisor
Florence Bunin .... puppet costume designer (segment "Pay the Two Dollars") (uncredited)
George Petty .... costume designer: Ziegfeld girls (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Ted Duncan .... music arranger
Roger Edens .... musical adapter
Lennie Hayton .... musical director
Wally Heglin .... orchestrator
Calvin Jackson .... music arranger
Paul Marquardt .... music arranger
Conrad Salinger .... orchestrator
Kay Thompson .... vocal arranger
Earl Cates .... music mixer (uncredited)
Fletcher Henderson .... music arranger (uncredited)
M.J. McLaughlin .... music mixer (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Robert Alton .... dance director
Roy Del Ruth .... additional choreographer
Henri Jaffa .... associate technicolor color director
Natalie Kalmus .... technicolor color director
Eugene Loring .... additional choreographer
Charles Walters .... additional choreographer
Helen Auer .... secretary: Mr. Freed (uncredited)
Eugene Joseff .... jeweller (uncredited)
Belva Lannan .... secretary: Mr. Edens (uncredited)
Joe Niemeyer .... stand-in: Fred Astaire (segment "Pay the Two Dollars") (uncredited)
Norman Taurog .... director of prologue and retakes (uncredited)
 

Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Ziegfeld Follies of 1946" - USA (poster title)
See more »
Runtime:
110 min | West Germany:85 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Sound System)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
One of only two films in which Gene Kelly and Fred Astaire danced together. The other was That's Entertainment, Part II (1976).See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: During the "A Great Lady Has An Interview," Judy Garland is continuously pushing her hair back out of her face during the interview portion of the scene. However, when the musical part begins her hair is firmly fixed up off of her face and stays that way until the end of the number when her dance moves have obviously loosened it up enough to start falling in her face again.See more »
Quotes:
[first lines]
Florenz Ziegfeld Jr.:Ah... Saturday, September twenty fifth. Another heavenly day. Ah, yes. Always a heavenly day.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in "Jeopardy!: Episode #26.181" (2010)See more »
Soundtrack:
Bring on the Wonderful MenSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
12 out of 15 people found the following review useful.
A Drop-Dead Gorgeous Show For The Serious Musical Fan, 20 August 2005
Author: gftbiloxi (gftbiloxi@yahoo.com) from Biloxi, Mississippi

The Ziegfeld Follies were legendary stage shows that consisted entirely of musical numbers and comedy routines performed by some of the greatest stars of the day. When sound began to roar in the late 1920s, the movie studios followed the Ziegfeld form and quickly produced a series of films that were variety-show in nature. But the musical review is a form that really works best on stage before a live audience: in short order the movie-going public turned its back on the style in favor of musicals that offered increasingly complex, sophisticated, and sometimes unexpectedly dark stories.

In the 1940s MGM, famous for its musicals, unexpectedly decided to revive the form--and to do so in the style of producer Florenz Ziegfeld. The result was an outrageous budget that would have made Ziegfeld himself blanch, a wave of imaginative visuals that could have never been crammed onto even the biggest Broadway stage, a host of legendary performers, and the occasional comedy routine for relief from the sheer spectacle of it all.

The big hurdle for modern audiences is the fact that we have become accustomed to variety shows through television; they no longer have a unique appeal and it is difficult for us to sit through two hours of it. Even so, most musical fans will probably find ZIEGFELD FOLLIES worth the effort; although it has a few weak spots, it is easily one of the most visually stunning flights of fancy ever put on the screen.

The weakest links in the chain are the comedy routines, all of which seem insubstantial at best, slightly clunky at worst; still, they are amusing in an old-fashioned sort of way and it is always a pleasure to see the legendary Fannie Brice, no matter how inconsequential the script may be. Fortunately, the film weighs in heavily on the musical side, and while the actual material may be a bit weak at times the look of the thing is absolutely eye-popping.

The opening number is nothing short of stunning: Fred Astaire introduces a riot in pink and black that includes a spinning Cyd Charisse, a turning merry-go-round with real white horses, and a formidable Lucille Ball keeping a host of leopard-like women in check with a whip! Truly, musicals are the most surreal of all performing arts genres, but this seems to stretch the boundaries quite a bit.

The film is filled with notable performers. Virginia O'Brien, the great comic singer, dismisses the ladies in favor of the men--indeed, it seems, almost any man will do. Esther Williams swirls elegantly in front of lavish underwater sets. James Melton and Marion Bell offer memorable performances of the most famous duet from LA TRAVIATA in a memorably designed setting. Katherine Grayson is surrounded by some truly unexpected sets, walls of bubbles, and gold-clad bathing beauties. Certainly no one can complain that there is nothing to see on the screen! Along the way we also have some truly legendary moments, chief among them two amazingly beautiful dance numbers performed by Fred Astaire and Lucille Bremer. The first, "This Heart of Mine," finds Astaire playing a jewel thief bent upon seducing Bremer at a ball: red and white with elaborate costumes, hidden treadmills, and decoratively turning platforms, it is both clever and very elegant. Even so, "Limehouse Blues" is finer still, introducing a mysterious Chinatown--and then suddenly bursting into a fantasia of white and blue and red as Astaire and Bremer dance out a love story that never was and never could ever be.

The film also offers two of MGM's most celebrated singing stars. During her MGM career Lena Horne was typically saddled with excessive movement and frequently peculiar costumes--but both actually work to her advantage here, and her performance of "Love" has tremendous tropical sizzle, to say the least. It may be a bit more difficult for modern viewers to know how to react to Judy Garland's "The Interview," for its references are lost; not only is it very much an industry insider joke, it is very much a take-off on "serious" actresses of the time who specialized in playing biographical roles, with Greer Garson a very specific target. Still, Garland nails it as only Garland can, and that says a great deal indeed.

The film also contains a true rarity: the only serious pairing of Fred Astaire and Gene Kelly, who lightly send up rumors of their rivalry--and then proceed to demonstrate just how truly competitive they could be in some of the finest choreography ever put on the screen. "The Babbit and the Bromide" is truly a remarkable thing to behold; you are constantly torn in your attention between the two men, each with very different styles and yet each truly incomparable.

In spite of its array of stars and remarkable visuals, ZIEGFELD FOLLIES was not among MGM's box-office knockouts of the 1940s and it was rarely seen after its original theatrical release. It is presently available only in VHS, and although the print is good it isn't the best possible--and since the visual spectacle is a prime reason for seeing the show you may want to hold out (and cross your fingers) for a full restoration on DVD. On the other hand, the out-of-print but still available VHS package does include the soundtrack on CD, which is a very strong plus.

Final thought on the film: unless you are a serious fan of MGM musicals you may want to skip this one, but if you are willing to make the act of acceptance the film requires you'll find ZIEGFELD FOLLIES a drop-dead gorgeous show.

Gary F. Taylor, aka GFT, Amazon Reviewer

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (39 total) »

Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for Ziegfeld Follies (1945)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Virginia O'Brien blueeyedbear
Tony Duquette Piperson
Is that Fred Kelsey at the end of Limehouse Blues tharrx
Judy had only one number surnive the cut from 3 hours oldsenior
The Babbit and the Bromide? Greensleeves
See more »

Related Links

Full cast and crew Company credits External reviews
News articles IMDb Comedy section IMDb USA section

You may report errors and omissions on this page to the IMDb database managers. They will be examined and if approved will be included in a future update. Clicking the 'Edit page' button will take you through a step-by-step process.