IMDb > Walky Talky Hawky (1946)

Walky Talky Hawky (1946) More at IMDbPro »


Overview

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7.6/10   400 votes »
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Director:
Writer:
Warren Foster (story)
Contact:
View company contact information for Walky Talky Hawky on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
31 August 1946 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
Young Henery Hawk's father regretfully admits their family's shame: they hunt and eat chickens. Henery set off to find one... See more » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Nominated for Oscar. See more »
User Reviews:
This is good clean violent fun, I say, this is good clean violent fun. See more (9 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order)

Mel Blanc ... Foghorn Leghorn / Henery Hawk / Barnyard Dog / Henry Hawk (voice)

Directed by
Robert McKimson 
 
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
Warren Foster  story

Produced by
Edward Selzer .... producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
Carl W. Stalling (uncredited)
 
Film Editing by
Treg Brown (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Treg Brown .... sound effects editor (uncredited)
 
Animation Department
Richard Bickenbach .... animator
Cal Dalton .... animator
Richard H. Thomas .... background artist
Don Williams .... animator
Cornett Wood .... layout artist
Lloyd Turner .... inbetween artist (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Carl W. Stalling .... musical director (as Carl Stalling)
Milt Franklyn .... orchestrator (uncredited)
 

Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
7 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Canada:G (Nova Scotia) | USA:Approved

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Foghorn Leghorn's line "Open the window, Richard!" is a reference to saxophonist Jack McVea's 1947 hit song, "Open the Door, Richard." In High Diving Hare (1949), when Yosemite Sam bangs on a closed door demanding that Bugs Bunny open it, he looks and speaks to the audience, saying "Did'ya notice, I didn't say Richard?"See more »
Quotes:
Foghorn Leghorn:[after Barnyard Dog plays a prank on him] Every day it's the same thing!See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
Chicken ReelSee more »

FAQ

How is this film notable for Foghorn Leghorn and the barnyard dog?
Who was the inspiration for Foghorn Leghorn?
Is this available on DVD?
See more »
2 out of 5 people found the following review useful.
This is good clean violent fun, I say, this is good clean violent fun., 25 July 2000
Author: Alice Liddel (-darragh@excite.com) from dublin, ireland

This Foghorn Leghorn short offers a twist on the usual Tom and Jerry/Sylvester and Tweety/Roadrunner and Wil E. Coyote model. Like those classics, we are offered a conflict between scavenger and prey. Unlike them, the scavenger is a sweet little cutie, while his victim is a bloated, blustery sneak. The film begins with lachrymose melodrama, as the hero's father tragically tells toddler Henery Hawk that he is a chicken hawk, that he must hunt chickens. With innocent bravado, he sets out to fulfil his duty, but his ominous first act is to fail to fly, falling and thudding from a great height.

Meanwhile Foghorn Leghorn is having his usual self-imposed troubles with Barnyard Dog, taunting the latter because safe in the knowledge of his being tied up. Foghorn is lovably unsympathetic, a windy, Burl Ives-type, full of cod-military guff; he'll turn any trick to save his own hide. This mixture of malice and cowardice makes him a true cousin of Bugs.

He sees in the chickenhawk an opportunity to further exasperate Barnyard, and, persuading the little fellow that he is a horse, and Barnyard a chicken, urges Henery to root out his meal. Much sadistic lunacy ensues, wonderfully brutal, with the scheming Foghorn not always coming out best.

This energetic short plays havoc with sentimental ideals of the pastoral, especially prominent just after the war - its celebration of metamorphosis, duplicity and cunning is heartening in that oppressive All American social atmosphere. There is also some bracing philosophy about the struggle between free-will and genetic destiny. A Tex Avery would have made this a classic, but a funny script and peerlessly protean Mel Blanc voicing make this a rare treat.

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