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Song of the South (1946)

Approved | | Animation, Comedy, Family | December 1946 (UK)
The kindly story-teller Uncle Remus tells a young boy stories about trickster Br'er Rabbit, who outwits Br'er Fox and slow-witted Br'er Bear.

Writers:

(book), (story) (as Dalton Reymond) | 6 more credits »
Reviews
Won 1 Oscar. Another 1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
...
James Baskett ...
...
Lucile Watson ...
...
Erik Rolf ...
John (as Eric Rolf)
Glenn Leedy ...
Toby
Mary Field ...
Mrs. Favers
Anita Brown ...
Maid
Georgie Nokes ...
Jake Favers (as George Nokes)
Gene Holland ...
Joe Favers
Nick Stewart ...
Br'er Bear (voice) (as Nicodemus Stewart)
Johnny Lee ...
Br'er Rabbit (voice)
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Storyline

Uncle Remus draws upon his tales of Brer Rabbit to help little Johnny deal his confusion over his parents' separation as well as his new life on the plantation. The tales: The Briar Patch, The Tar Baby and Brer Rabbit's Laughing place. Written by Paul Penna <tterrace@wco.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

rabbit | boy | tar | laughing | briar patch | See All (85) »

Taglines:

The Story of Brer Rabbit, Brer Bear & Brer Fox. See more »


Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

December 1946 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

Uncle Remus  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound System)

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In 1972, Buena Vista distributed this film on a double bill with The Boatniks (1970). See more »

Goofs

Shadows of the mike and boom are visible in the early scene in Johnny's room. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Uncle Remus: There's other ways of learning about the behind feet of a mule than getting kicked by them, sure as I'm named Remus. And just because these here tales is about critters like Br'er Rabbit an' Br'er Fox, that don't mean they ain't the same like can happen to folks! So them who can't learn from a tale about critters, just ain't got the ears tuned for listening.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Joe Dirt (2001) See more »

Soundtracks

Sooner Or Later (You're Gonna Be Comin' Around)
(uncredited)
Written by Charles Wolcott and Ray Gilbert
Performed by Hattie McDaniel
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

 
This Disney Classic Deserves To Be Re-issued!
29 September 2001 | by (USA) – See all my reviews

I think it's a great shame that the 1946 Walt Disney classic, "Song Of The South," has been banned in the U.S. because some civil rights groups **15 years ago** complained that the movie was racist and they did not want it to be shown anymore. And Disney, not wanting to offend anyone, bowed down to their demands and yanked the film from public viewing in North America, where it has not been seen since. The only way you can watch "Song Of The South" now is if you still own a laserdisc player and you're willing to spring for a costly Japanese import disc, OR if you manage to track down a UK VHS copy of the film released in 1997 and have it transferred. Well, having viewed a transferred VHS copy of "Song Of The South" recently, I can honestly say that this is a marvelous Disney movie that is NOT racist and does NOT deserve to be hidden away.

While I can certainly understand the concerns of the civil rights groups over "Song Of The South," the fact that the movie is set during the turn-of-the-century South when many blacks served subservient roles is NOT a good enough reason to hide the film away from the public. This is not an issue of racism, it is simply a historical fact. Furthermore, the black characters in "Song Of The South" are all treated with respect. They are not treated badly, nor are they spoken to badly. Further still, are we going to destroy all copies of "Gone With The Wind" just because it features a black maid? Think about it.

What also upsets me about the shunning of "Song Of The South" in the U.S. is that most Americans will now never get to see anymore the marvelous performance of James Baskett as the loveable storyteller Uncle Remus (and Baskett DID win an Honorary Oscar for his fine work in this film, lest we forget). Nor will Americans ever get to see again the wonderful Disney artistry on display in "Song Of The South" that perfectly blends live action with animation (the very first film to do so, if I'm not mistaken). They won't get to enjoy the hilarious adventures of Brer Rabbit ever again. Nor will they be able to sing along with the Oscar-winning song, "Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah" anymore. All of this, in my opinion, is very, very shameful.

I strongly implore Walt Disney Productions to reconsider re-issuing "Song Of The South" in North America, if *only* for a limited time on home video, so anybody Stateside who wants the film can finally have it. And with all due respect to the civil rights groups who complained about "Song Of The South" back in 1986, I strongly implore them to seriously rethink the ban that they had Disney place upon the film. On the Grammy telecast this past year, just before mega-controversial rapper Eminem took the stage to perform "Stan," the Grammy president came onstage to give a little pep talk about freedom of speech & freedom of expression. He said that we cannot ban certain artists and their work just because it makes certain people uncomfortable. The EXACT same thing can be said for Walt Disney's "Song Of The South."


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For once and forever, it's set AFTER the Civil War imdbrwd
Uncle Remus Question zsofikam
Any Official copies on video or dvd? motiqueantiques
Do y'all really not get it? eminges
Do African American People Find this Movie Offensive? thrillofthechase
Isn't Song of The South kinda anti-racist while being racist? mojo_jo_jo24
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