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Sioux City Sue (I) (1946)

6.7
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Ratings: 6.7/10 from 61 users  
Reviews: 5 user | 2 critic

Utilizing a script from 1939's "She Married a Cop" with a 1946 Hit Parade song for the title, Gene Autry's screen return following his WW II Army Air Corps service, "Sioux City Sue" has ... See full summary »

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(original screenplay)
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Title: Sioux City Sue (1946)

Sioux City Sue (1946) on IMDb 6.7/10

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
Champion ...
Champ, Gene's Horse (as Champion - Wonder Horse of the West)
Lynne Roberts ...
Sue Warner
...
Nelson 'Nellie' Bly
Richard Lane ...
Jefferson Lang
Ralph Sanford ...
Big Gulliver
Ken Lundy ...
Jody
Helen Wallace ...
Miss Price
Pierre Watkin ...
G.W. Rhodes
The Cass County Boys ...
Musical Autry Ranchhands (as Cass County Boys)
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Storyline

Utilizing a script from 1939's "She Married a Cop" with a 1946 Hit Parade song for the title, Gene Autry's screen return following his WW II Army Air Corps service, "Sioux City Sue" has Hollywood talent scout Sue Warner (Lynne Roberts) in search of a singing cowboy and finding and offering cattle rancher Gene Autry (Gene Autry) a contract. He agrees to go to Hollywood if there is a part for his horse Champion. Gene isn't aware they only want to use his voice in an animated cartoon. After the preview, he and Champ depart in a huff (Well, actually, Champ was in a trailer). The annoyed Sue also follows and gets work on Gene's ranch as a cook. Later, the studio heads, while looking at Gene's screen test, decide he is a natural and want to sign him to a contract. After a few misunderstandings, Gene realizes that Sue is sincere, and he signs a contract to star in a musical western, but first he has to stop a cattle stampede and rout a gang of rustlers trying to blow up his ranch dam. Written by Les Adams <longhorn1939@suddenlink.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Music | Western

Certificate:

Approved
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Details

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Release Date:

21 November 1946 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Sioux City Sue  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(original) | (edited)

Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Quotes

Sue Warner: I can cook... a little.
Gene Autry: Maybe you can parlay that into a lot.
Sue Warner: Oh, can I! Will you help me bring in my bags?
Gene Autry: Not in here! We have a nice cozy little room - in the barn.
Sue Warner: In the what?
Gene Autry: The barn.
Sue Warner: The barn! Oh. Well, how delightfully rustic.
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Connections

Version of She Married a Cop (1939) See more »

Soundtracks

You Stole My Heart
Music by Harry Sosnik
Lyrics by Stanley Adams
Sung by Gene Autry
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User Reviews

 
A Look Behind the Scenes
30 September 2007 | by (Claremont,USA) – See all my reviews

A highly enjoyable Autry western, boosted by a spirited supporting cast, a non-formula script, and a sprinkling of very listenable songs including the delightful title number. Autry was always an unlikely cowboy hero, short, stout, and wooden, yet his way with a song was always pleasant and natural, while his horsemanship and fight scenes were as convincing as any. His secret of success may well have been his ordinariness. Unlike a towering John Wayne, Crash Corrigan, or innumerable other icons of the Saturday matinée, Autry was always within reach of the audience, a reassuring nearness for those of us who knew we would never grow into the boots of a Wayne or Corrigan. Anyway, I suppose the audience for this kind of innocent bucolic fun dwindles each year as we matinée kids age and shuffle off, leaving such fare to film historians and curiosity seekers. Historians should find this film particularly revealing for its behind-the-scenes look at the making of musical westerns, and also for a fluttery Sterling Holloway, a most unlikely comic relief for the macho western, which, I suppose, amounted to someone's comment on the film industry since he appears as a production assistant. The leading lady also goes against type. A hard-driving studio scout, who overshadows the laid-back Autry, she defies patriarchal expectations by remaining with the studio at film's end. All in all, this programmer rises above the low expectations of a cowboy movie and remains well worth a look on several levels.  


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