6.4/10
48
6 user 2 critic

The Searching Wind (1946)

Approved | | Drama, War | 9 August 1946 (USA)
Always the diplomat, Alex Hazen is slow to take sides in Europe of the 1920s and 1930s. Cassie Bowwman wants him to be more decisive and leaves him in Rome just as Mussolini is coming to ... See full summary »

Director:

Writers:

(play), (screenplay)
Reviews

Photos

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Certificate: Passed Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.4/10 X  

A love story centered around the lives of three young German soldiers in the years following World War I. Their close friendship is strengthened by their shared love for the same woman who ... See full summary »

Director: Frank Borzage
Stars: Robert Taylor, Margaret Sullavan, Franchot Tone
Comedy | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.3/10 X  

The naive Evelyn Warren, elected shool-teacher of the year by Time Magazine, goes to Las Vegas, where she loses a lot of money. In order to pay her debts, casino-manager Matt Braddock asks ... See full summary »

Director: Douglas Sirk
Stars: Linda Darnell, Stephen McNally, Gigi Perreau
Comedy | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.4/10 X  

Jan Stewart, a new teacher at The Oaks, a boys' boarding school, becomes instructor and mother-figure to a class of twelve. She must overcome the disapproval of Joe Hargrave, head of the ... See full summary »

Director: Robert Z. Leonard
Stars: Greer Garson, Robert Ryan, Barry Sullivan
Comedy | Drama | Mystery
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.6/10 X  

Kenny Williams, a lieutenant on the homicide squad, is engaged to Maxine Carroll, the Mayor's secretary. Or isn't he rather married with his job? For each time he has a date with his ... See full summary »

Director: Alexander Hall
Stars: Melvyn Douglas, Joan Blondell, Clarence Kolb
Aunt Clara (1954)
Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

A wealthy old man dies and leaves his holdings--including a brothel and a gambling den, racing greyhounds and a sleazy bar--to his eccentric niece Clara. Clara vows to "clean up" her new ... See full summary »

Director: Anthony Kimmins
Stars: Ronald Shiner, Margaret Rutherford, A.E. Matthews
Certificate: Passed Comedy | Crime | Mystery
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  

Charlie tries to discover the identity of a strangler who strikes multiple times on a cruise ship bound from Honolulu to California.

Director: Eugene Forde
Stars: Sidney Toler, Marjorie Weaver, Lionel Atwill
Certificate: Passed Crime | Drama | Mystery
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

The story revolves around three people; Tycoon Bjorn Faulkner, who is being called upon by his board of directors to explain a missing $20,000,000; Kit Lane, his secretary who also has a ... See full summary »

Director: William Clemens
Stars: Robert Preston, Ellen Drew, Nils Asther
Crime | Romance | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.2/10 X  

1947: Captain Jeff Eliott returns to Germany to thank the Lehrt family, who hid him during WW-II when his plane was shot down over Munich. However he learns that the parents died when their... See full summary »

Director: Andrew Marton
Stars: Gene Kelly, Pier Angeli, Richard Rober
Split Second (1953)
Crime | Drama | Film-Noir
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.9/10 X  

Two escaped killers take hostages and hide in a Nevada mining ghost town knowing that an atom bomb is scheduled to be tested there the next morning.

Director: Dick Powell
Stars: Stephen McNally, Alexis Smith, Jan Sterling
Dallas (1950)
Romance | Western
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.3/10 X  

A former Confederate officer hunting for an outlaw who wronged him finds him in Dallas, but now as a wealthy, respectable citizen.

Director: Stuart Heisler
Stars: Gary Cooper, Ruth Roman, Steve Cochran
Horror | Mystery
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.2/10 X  

Private eye Jerry Church is hired by a criminal defense lawyer after five mobsters he has gotten acquitted are apparently strangled by a serial killer.

Director: William Nigh
Stars: Patric Knowles, Lionel Atwill, Anne Gwynne
Drama | Mystery | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.6/10 X  

A bored WWI veteran helps out a young woman, whose uncle is being held hostage by embezzlers.

Director: F. Richard Jones
Stars: Ronald Colman, Claud Allister, Lawrence Grant
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
...
...
Moses
...
Sam Hazen
...
Count von Stammer
...
Torrone
...
Sears, the Butler
...
Sophronia, the Maid
...
Mrs. Hayworth
Charles D. Brown ...
Carter
...
David
William Trenk ...
Ponette
...
Sam as a Boy
Ann Carter ...
Sarah Hazen
Edit

Storyline

Always the diplomat, Alex Hazen is slow to take sides in Europe of the 1920s and 1930s. Cassie Bowwman wants him to be more decisive and leaves him in Rome just as Mussolini is coming to power. There Alex marries Emily, daughter of a newspaper publisher who hires Cassie for his Paris bureau -- just before retiring from active management of his paper. Alex and Emily's son Sam, recently returned from active duty in World War II, learns the whole story one night in Washington when Emily invites Cassie to dinner. Sam has a story to tell, too. Written by Dale O'Connor <daleoc@interaccess.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

based on play | See All (1) »

Genres:

Drama | War

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

9 August 1946 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A Esperança não Morre  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

One of over 700 Paramount Productions, filmed between 1929 and 1949, which were sold to MCA/Universal in 1958 for television distribution, and have been owned and controlled by Universal ever since. Its earliest documented telecast took place in Seattle 27 February 1959 on KIRO (Channel 7), followed by Omaha 1 March 1959 on KETV (Channel 7), by Asheville 24 May 1959 on WLOS (Channel 13), by Grand Rapids 27 September 1959 on WOOD (Channel 8), by Milwaukee 6 October 1959 on WITI (Channel 6), by Pittsburgh 21 November 1959 on KDKA (Channel 2), and by Indianapolis 3 December 1960 on WFBM (Channel 6). See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Fancy High-flown Talkfest
13 July 2000 | by See all my reviews

Hal Wallis lays on a posh production, complete with tinkling crystal chandeliers, gilded ballrooms and wall-to-wall violin accompaniment, all so that journalist Sylvia Sidney can reproach diplomat Robert Young for his cowardice in not denouncing fascism [while they toy with rekindling their youthful affair]. Lillian Hellman's script boots them all across Europe, from Mussolini's takeover of Rome to the bombing of Madrid to the signing of the Munich Accord . Meanwhile, Young's wife [Ann Richards] entertains assorted brownshirts and blackshirts because she's a shallow socialite, while their war-wounded son [Douglas Dick, in Montgomery Clift's star-making Broadway role] stays home to sort out his own objections to the family's appeasement policies.

For mainstream Hollywood, this idea-driven story was an honorable attempt to dramatize issues of conscience and responsibility [though criticism of official silence about budding fascist regimes was surely a bit late by 1946]. However, everyone gets to face a moral crisis here, from crusty Grandpa [Dudley Digges] down to a waiter who pauses to deliver a lecture on Woodrow Wilson, and marrying its serious ideas with an uncompelling love triangle seems contrived.

Hellman writes literate but non-stop dialogue, making everyone mouth the same high-minded generalities ["Whenever people talk about not taking sides, they've already taken one," or "People who know what they want don't wait to get it."] After an hour of politely listening to such unlikely repartee, we gradually grow weary, then dismayed, and finally exasperated. Was Hellman paid by the word, like Dickens?

This torrent of talk leaves no room for the film to breathe, so all of William Dieterle's fluent staging produces only claustrophobia. Also, while Lee Garmes' exquisite lighting and Hans Dreier's cavernous interiors mark a high point in Hollywood gloss, the decor is so fancy that we in the audience can only goggle in awe at the dilemmas of these privileged power-brokers, surely not what Hellman intended. Still, as James Agee noted, "People as highly civilized as these are seldom seen in the movies, and are still more seldom played with understanding." True, but one is tempted to throw buckets of ice water on the cast to stop their debating.


6 of 7 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 6 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page