IMDb > Rome, Open City (1945)
Roma città aperta
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Rome, Open City (1945) More at IMDbPro »Roma città aperta (original title)

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Overview

User Rating:
8.1/10   14,632 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
Sergio Amidei (screenplay) and
Federico Fellini (collaboration on screenplay) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Rome, Open City on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
27 September 1945 (Italy) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
The location: Nazi occupied Rome. As Rome is classified an open city, most Romans can wander the streets... See more » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Nominated for Oscar. Another 6 wins See more »
NewsDesk:
(59 articles)
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User Reviews:
A positive review that explains the director's motives. See more (52 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)
Aldo Fabrizi ... Don Pietro Pellegrini

Anna Magnani ... Pina
Marcello Pagliero ... Giorgio Manfredi aka Luigi Ferraris
Vito Annichiarico ... Piccolo Marcello
Nando Bruno ... Agostino the Sexton
Harry Feist ... Major Bergmann
Giovanna Galletti ... Ingrid
Francesco Grandjacquet ... Francesco
Eduardo Passarelli ... Neighborhood Police Sergeant (as Passarelli)
Maria Michi ... Marina Mari
Carla Rovere ... Lauretta
Carlo Sindici ... Police Commissioner
Joop van Hulzen ... Captain Hartmann (as Van Hulzen)
Ákos Tolnay ... Austrian Deserter (as A. Tolnay)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Caterina Di Furia ... Woman in street scene (uncredited)
Laura Clara Giudice ... Bit Part (uncredited)
Turi Pandolfini ... Grandfather (uncredited)
Amalia Pellegrini ... Nannina (uncredited)
Spartaco Ricci ... Geman motorcyclist (uncredited)
Doretta Sestan ... Bit Part (uncredited)
Alberto Tavazzi ... The Priest (uncredited)

Directed by
Roberto Rossellini 
 
Writing credits
Sergio Amidei  screenplay and
Federico Fellini  collaboration on screenplay &
Roberto Rossellini  collaboration on screenplay

Sergio Amidei  story and
Alberto Consiglio  additional material &
Roberto Rossellini  additional material

Produced by
Giuseppe Amato .... producer (uncredited)
Ferruccio De Martino .... producer (uncredited)
Rod E. Geiger .... producer (uncredited)
Roberto Rossellini .... producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
Renzo Rossellini 
 
Cinematography by
Ubaldo Arata 
 
Film Editing by
Eraldo Da Roma 
Jolanda Benvenuti (uncredited)
 
Production Design by
Rosario Megna 
 
Production Management
Ferruccio De Martino .... production manager
Mario Del Papa .... production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Sergio Amidei .... assistant director
Federico Fellini .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Raffaele Del Monte .... sound
 
Visual Effects by
Stefano Ballirano .... digital restoration supervisor (restored version)
Stefano Camberini .... digital restoration artist (restored version)
Pablo Mariano Picabea .... film recording (restored version)
Paolo Verrucci .... digital color grading restoration (restored version)
Stefanacci .... visual effects (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Vincenzo Seratrice .... camera operator
 
Music Department
Luigi Ricci .... orchestra conductor
 
Other crew
Vincenzo Genesi .... laboratory manager: Tecnostampa (as V. Genesi)
J. Tuzzi .... continuity
Ferruccio Amendola .... voice dubbing: Vito Annichiarico (uncredited)
Rosetta Calavetta .... voice dubbing: Carla Rovere (uncredited)
Gualtiero De Angelis .... voice dubbing: Francesco Grandjacquet (uncredited)
Pietro Di Donato .... subtitler: English (uncredited)
Lauro Gazzolo .... voice dubbing: Marcello Pagliero (uncredited)
Giulio Panicali .... voice dubbing: Harry Feist (uncredited)
Roswita Schmidt .... voice dubbing: Giovanna Galletti (uncredited)
Herman G. Weinberg .... subtitler: English (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Roma città aperta" - Italy (original title)
See more »
Runtime:
103 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Recording)
Certification:
Argentina:16 | Australia:M | Finland:K-12 (2014) (TV rating) | Finland:K-16 (1955) | France:U | Germany:12 (cut) (DVD rating) | Portugal:M/12 | Spain:13 | Sweden:15 | UK:15 | UK:12 (re-rating) (2005) | USA:Approved | USA:Not Rated | West Germany:16 (re-rating) (cut) | West Germany:(Banned) (1950-1961)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Despite his name in the credits, Eraldo Da Roma did not edit this film, as he was in prison at the time. It was cut in very difficult conditions by Jolanda Benvenuti. This is what she reveals in Paolo Isaja and Maria Pia Melandri's documentary _Jolanda e Rossellini - Memorie indiscrete (1995)_.See more »
Quotes:
Major Bergman:Then I'll tell you who he is. He's subversive, he's fought with the Reds in Spain. His life is dedicated to fighting society, religion. He is an atheist... your enemy...
Don Pietro:I am a Catholic priest. I believe that those who fight for justice and truth walk in the path of God and the paths of God are infinite
See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
Mallinata FiorentinaSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
18 out of 30 people found the following review useful.
A positive review that explains the director's motives., 3 February 1999
Author: John McAllister (jmcallis@wlu.edu) from Lexington, VA

Open City

The Neo-Realistic film Open City relives the tragic suffering of Italy and the people's resistance to Nazi occupation during World War II. The story depicts how a liberation group tries to conceal its leader, Giorgio Manfredi. The role each plays in the resistance reveals an intimate portrayal of their lives. Whether for religion, love, rebellion, greed, or nationalism these rebels attempt to make sense of war and cope with their problems. The omniscient point of view provides an understanding of each character's motivation to survive their dreadful situation. The director, Rossellini, made Open City an attempt to "restore the nationalism from the chaos" left by the war. In order to restore the nationalism for his audience, Rossellini reconciled the characters' differences through their common motivation for better lives.

Brecht said, in referring to Neo-Realism, "it doesn't show real things, its shows how things really are." I feel that despite the low budget and quality of stock, Rossellini made an excellent film full of real life images. The strength of the screenplay, through its poignant representation of the wartime struggle, made Open City an outstanding film. Rossellini properly explained the human condition in a way that Italians and all viewers could empathize. However, I am not convinced the film's message came across correctly, as a nationalistic film. In the documentary, Neo-Realism, a gentleman thought it depicted Italians poorly. This contradicts the entire message of the film.

Content

The screenplay by Sergio Amidei and Federico Fellini powerfully captures the importance of the characters' personalities set in this wartime struggle for survival. The motivation of Pina and Francesco is love. They enjoy a love for their country, their son, and their lives. Especially poignant was the scene in which they sat in the stairwell and remembered the good times and hoped for better. Pina's sister, Marina is motivated by greed. She has had many lovers and even sold her friends for her materialistic needs. She finally sees the effect of her horrible deeds; but then it is too late when Manfredi is dead. Giorgio Manfredi is motivated by his nationalism for Italy and loyalty to the liberation movement. His patriotism and loyalty to friends are idealized in the imprisonment and a torture scene where he refuses to talk and is at peace with his fate as a martyr. Don Pietro Pellegrini is motivated by faith. Don Pietro believes that God's Will has brought the war. He believes prayer and forgiveness are the answers to suffering. Nevertheless he is also a practical man. As a forger he shows he can contribute more than prayer to the struggle. His compromise as a religious figure suggests that there are no black and white lines separating roles and ideals of the independence movement.

Marcello, Pina's son, is motivated by rebellion and group behavior. Marcello, although young and immature, is an excellent representation of the citizens who organized and rebelled against the Nazis. The point is made that even at his age he could play a role in the war. Marcello therefore symbolizes the significance of the most insignificant person and the struggle of all Rome. Also, as a youthful figure he also symbolizes the future of Rome and Italy. In the final scene he and his friend console each other as they march back to the city. This suggests that Italians must comfort each other and rebuild after the war.

Form

The film's low budget is evident through its various technical flaws. The film stock was a poor quality and originated from different reels. In splitting the stock there lacks a consistent flow to the film. There are points in the film where sound is completely eliminated and others where camera angles are suddenly adjusted, as if they were editing over a previous scene (editor-Eraldo Da Roma). A lack of continuity is seen in the scene where a car is filmed approaching a building. When the car stops, the film seems make a quick edit and then switches to a new camera angle as people leave the car. Another flaw is the poor quality of lighting in the film. In an effort to put certain emphasis on a person or object, light floods some areas. This makes it impossible to view it without difficulty. Additionally too much light is given when a "medium shot" is given to characters as they sit giving a monologue. Ingrid, the Nazi's girlfriend, often receives too much light when she speaks. Perhaps it is her pale skin or the cinematographer's desire to emphasize the face resulting in overexposure (cinematographer-Ubaldo Arata). This distracts from the movement and speech of the actress. Finally, the colors of the apartment walls are too bright. As characters move throughout the hallways and stairways, the bright light background reduces their depth and texture.

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