Notorious
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb


News for
Notorious (1946) More at IMDbPro »


2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006

14 items from 2014


Here's looking at you, kid by Jennie Kermode - 2014-11-18 00:42:42

17 November 2014 4:42 PM, PST | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Ingrid Bergman in Notorious.

She broke Bogie's heart in Casablanca, played a troubled wife in Journey To Italy and became a Hitchcock heroine in Spellbound and Notorious. Now Ingrid Bergman is set to feature in a retrospective strand at the 2015 Glasgow Film Festival. The three time Oscar winner will be celebrated with screenings of her most famous films alongside rare opportunities to see her early Swedish work.

Today's announcement from the festival team also included news of a new Australian strand to include some of the best new cinema from Down Under, plus a celebration of modern families and a strand dedicated to Glasgow itself. The festival's popular geek strands will be combined into Nerdvana, covering games and comics and cult film, while the Pioneer strand will celebrate emerging filmmakers.

This year, the festival will be utilising new venues in the east and south of the city, spreading out to bring. »

- Jennie Kermode

Permalink | Report a problem


The Past, Present, and Future of Real-Time Films Part One

17 October 2014 8:00 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

What do film directors Alfred Hitchcock, Stanley Kubrick, Agnès Varda, Robert Wise, Fred Zinnemann, Luis Buñuel, Alain Resnais, Roman Polanski, Sidney Lumet, Robert Altman, Louis Malle, Richard Linklater, Tom Tykwer, Alexander Sokurov, Paul Greengrass, Song Il-Gon, Alfonso Cuarón, and Alejandro Iñárritu have in common? More specifically, what type of film have they directed, setting them apart from fewer than 50 of their filmmaking peers? Sorry, “comedy” or “drama” isn’t right. If you’ve looked at this article’s headline, you’ve probably already guessed that the answer is that they’ve all made “real-time” films, or films that seemed to take about as long as their running time.

The real-time film has long been a sub-genre without much critical attention, but the time of the real-time film has come. Cuarón’s Gravity (2013), which was shot and edited so as to seem like a real-time film, floated away with the most 2014 Oscars, »

- Daniel Smith-Rowsey

Permalink | Report a problem


See Reddit users’ favorite movie from each year

2 September 2014 12:56 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Throughout the summer, an admin on the r/movies subreddit has been leading Reddit users in a poll of the best movies from every year for the last 100 years called 100 Years of Yearly Cinema. The poll concluded three days ago, and the list of every movie from 1914 to 2013 has been published today.

Users were asked to nominate films from a given year and up-vote their favorite nominees. The full list includes the outright winner along with the first two runners-up from each year. The list is mostly a predictable assortment of IMDb favorites and certified classics, but a few surprise gems have also risen to the top of the crust, including the early experimental documentary Man With a Movie Camera in 1929, Abel Gance’s J’Accuse! in 1919, the Fred Astaire film Top Hat over Alfred Hitchcock’s The 39 Steps in 1935, and Stanley Kubrick’s The Killing over John Ford’s »

- Brian Welk

Permalink | Report a problem


The Noteworthy: Backing Beijing, "Labour" by Cléo, Kent Jones on Nyff

27 August 2014 11:46 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Edited by Adam Cook

Film festival programmers from around the world are joining in signing a Statement of Support for the Beijing Independent Film Festival:

"As independent film festivals and supporters of independent cinema, we have learned with deep concern that the Chinese government and police authorities have prevented the 11th Beijing Independent Film Festival based in Songzhuang, Beijing, from opening last weekend, August 23rd, and detained its organizers Wang Hongwei, Fan Rong, and Li Xianting for several hours. We are also deeply concerned that Biff’s sponsoring organization, the Li Xianting Film Fund, has been raided, and the entirety of its invaluable archives of independent Chinese cinema have reportedly been confiscated.

We call upon the relevant Chinese authorities to permit the Beijing Independent Film Festival to pursue its mission to nurture and exhibit a full range of alternative cinematic voices in China, to allow the festival to operate without interference, »

- Notebook

Permalink | Report a problem


Video of the Day: See Every Alfred Hitchcock Cameo

21 August 2014 10:01 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Any Hitchcock fan has no doubt looked carefully while watching one of his movies in order to spot his infamous cameos. Hitchcock’s earlier cameos are especially hard to catch, and so Youtube user Morgan T. Rhys put together this video compiling every cameo Alfred Hitchcock ever made.

Hitchcock made a total of 39 self-referential cameos in his films over a 50 year period. Four of his films featured two cameo appearances (The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog UK), Suspicion, Rope, and Under Capricorn). Two recurring themes featured Hitchcock carrying a musical instrument, and using public transportation.

The films are as follows:

The Lodger (1927), Easy Virtue (1928), Blackmail (1929),Murder! (1930), The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934), The 39 Steps (1935),Sabotage (1936), Young and Innocent (1937), The Lady Vanishes (1938), Rebecca(1940), Foreign Correspondent (1940), Mr. & Mrs. Smith (1941), Suspicion (1941),Saboteur (1942), Shadow of a Doubt (1943), Lifeboat (1944), Spellbound (1945),Notorious (1946), The Paradine Case (1947), Rope (1948), Under Capricorn (1949),Stage Fright (1950), Strangers on a Train »

- Ricky

Permalink | Report a problem


1,000 Classics and Cult Hits to Be Restored for Home Entertainment

15 August 2014 2:04 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

In a nondescript building in Burbank, Reliance MediaWorks has begun work on bringing a thousand films — some of them cult classics, many rarely seen for decades — back to life.

The list is wildly eclectic, ranging from classics of world cinema (“The Bicycle Thief,” “Notorious,” “The Third Man”) to cult hits (“Andy Warhol’s Dracula” and “Andy Warhol’s Frankenstein”) to early Bruce Lee, Hammer horror films, exploitation titles and foreign films. Almost every film on the list has a recognizable actor or director, but many have never been released for home viewing.

Rmw hopes that the new releases will not only bring life back to audience favorites, but also introduce the works to new eyes.

“What makes this collection of movies extremely unique is that many of the films have never been released on DVD, let alone Blu-Ray,” said Naresh Malik, president of media and creative services. “Anyone who sees »

- Shelli Weinstein

Permalink | Report a problem


Hitchcock Takes Over Paramount and State This Week

12 August 2014 9:00 AM, PDT | Slackerwood | See recent Slackerwood news »

By Frank Calvillo

Few other filmmakers lived to see their name become synonymous with a specific brand of filmmaking quite like Alfred Hitchcock did. This month, as part of their Summer Classic Film Series, the Paramount and Stateside Theaters have lined up a weeklong tribute to Hitchcock featuring the likes of Psycho and The Birds, among other gems from the master of suspense; each of which, regardless of how many prior viewings, remains a thrilling pleasure to see on the big screen.

"We're playing the hits, and a few B-sides too," proclaims Paramount's official site in describing Hitchcock week. Hits is right with North by Northwest, Vertigo and Notorious also scheduled to screen, while "second-tier" Hitchcock classics Rebecca and Strangers on a Train (screening the following week) also make appearances. However, it's the four interestingly chosen aforementioned B-sides that prove interesting highlights and really speak to Hitchcock's versatility as a filmmaker. »

- Contributors

Permalink | Report a problem


Worst movies to watch while travelling

28 June 2014 12:30 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Regardless of your destination, holidays should be full of fun, excitement and of course, relaxation. One of the best ways to unwind whilst on the road is to kick back and watch a film from the comfort of your hotel bed, deckchair or plane seat. While there are some fantastic blockbusters and classic flicks to be seen, there are also some movies that you should evade at all costs when travelling. To help you avoid that niggling feeling of fear they may provoke, we’ve compiled this list of films that should never make an appearance on the ultrabooks of tech savvy travellers.

Taken

If you’re a young female traveller, Taken is not a good choice of holiday entertainment. This story involves young women in deep jeopardy while on holiday. While former CIA operative Bryan Mills (played by a mega tough Liam Neeson ) manages to rescue his holidaying daughter »

- Gary Collinson

Permalink | Report a problem


Jerry’s Ten Greatest Horror Films Of All Time!!

28 March 2014 9:30 AM, PDT | iconsoffright.com | See recent Icons of Fright news »

What better way to celebrate Icons of Fright’s ten year anniversary, than with a barrage of our favorites?, whether they be lists of our favorite entries into the French horror genre, our favorite badasses, or like this one, the films that make up what is (in my opinion), the greatest horror films of all time. Like always, art is subjective, so before you rabid fright fiends call foul on me, just remember, this is “Jerry’s Ten Greatest Horror Films of All Time”, so it is just that: mine. So if you disagree, comment and tell me yours, as Icons of Fright has always been for the fans and comprised Of fans, so feel free to sound off! With all of that said, it’s go time!

 

10.) Re-animator (1985)

Stuart Gordon’s film adaption of the H.P. Lovecraft story “Herbert West: Reanimator” is thought of to many, as one of »

- Jerry Smith

Permalink | Report a problem


Blu-ray Review: Alfred Hitchcock’s ‘Foreign Correspondent’ Joins Criterion Club

15 February 2014 7:11 PM, PST | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Cinema history has a few great double-up years: 12-month periods in which a classic filmmaker had not one but two great films. Mel Brooks may be the most notorious, releasing two of the best comedies of all time in 1974 (“Blazing Saddles” & “Young Frankenstein”) and Steven Spielberg has arguably done it a few times, inarguably in 1993 (“Jurassic Park” & “Schindler’s List”) and he would double-up again in 2002 (“Minority Report” & “Catch Me If You Can”) and 2011 (“Tintin” & “War Horse”).

One of the most-often forgotten double-up years was Alfred Hitchcock’s first year as an American filmmaker — 1940, which saw the premiere of “Rebecca” in April and “Foreign Correspondent” in August. The former has been a Criterion inductee for years and the latter joins the most important club in Blu-ray/DVD history this week in a finely-transferred and wonderfully accompanied release.

Rating: 3.5/5.0

Rebecca” has the higher historical pedigree, largely because it’s less dry »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

Permalink | Report a problem


Review: Hitchcock's "Foreign Correspondent" (1940), Criterion Dual Format Release

15 February 2014 3:32 AM, PST | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

Hitchcock’s War Face

By Raymond Benson

Alfred Hitchcock’s 1940 film Foreign Correspondent is often underrated or forgotten when it comes to lists of the director’s “best” films. In fact, it was nominated for an Oscar Best Picture the same year as Rebecca (which won), and, personally, I think it’s the better movie. It’s certainly more of a “Hitchcock film” than Rebecca, as it is one of those cross-country espionage adventure-thrillers along the lines of The 39 Steps, Saboteur, and North by Northwest.

It was the director’s second Hollywood movie. Although Hitchcock was contracted to David O. Selznick (who produced Rebecca), Hitch’s deal allowed Selznick to “farm out” the director to other studios and producers, for a piece of Hitchcock’s salary, of course. In this case, Foreign Correspondent was produced by Walter Wanger (who had also produced John Ford’s Stagecoach). It’s interesting that »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

Permalink | Report a problem


German Concentration Camps Factual Survey: Berlin Review

14 February 2014 4:15 AM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Berlin -- An extremely graphic and hard-to-watch documentary feature about the Nazi concentration camps, German Concentration Camps Factual Survey, was shot by cameramen from the Allied Forces in 1945, who tried to document what they found on the ground. The film’s subsequent production process was supervised by Alfred Hitchcock, probably between making Spellbound and Notorious, but the project was shelved indefinitely in September 1945 and has now finally been completed by the U.K.’s Imperial War Museum. The first five reels of the film had been presented at the Berlinale in 1984 and subsequently shown on a Boston

read more

»

- Boyd van Hoeij

Permalink | Report a problem


Alfred Hitchcock’s 10 Best Female Roles, In Honor of Kim Novak’s Birthday

13 February 2014 2:43 PM, PST | The Backlot | See recent The Backlot news »

Happy birthday to the glamorous Kim Novak, who is 81 today. It’s impossible to think of Novak without remembering her shock blonde super-coif in Vertigo (not to mention the way she werrrrrked Edith Head‘s form-sucking pencil skirts), and thus, it’s impossible to think of Novak without remembering the great female roles in Hitchcock movies. Here are my picks for the 10 best.

10. Miss Froy in The Lady Vanishes (Dame May Whitty)

This is sort of a gonzo first pick, but give it up: The Lady Vanishes rules and Dame May Whitty, with all her grandmotherly charms, is just a subversive ol’ hoot as the bad-ass spy who sets up the intrigue of the story. This is the kind of role Margaret Rutherford would win an Oscar for. You underestimate the depth of how much she kicks ass.

9. Marnie in Marnie (Tippi Hedren)

Is it wild? Oh, yes. Is it sometimes a little embarrassing? »

- Louis Virtel

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Journey to Italy’ and the Other Side of the Hollywood Sunset

22 January 2014 10:00 AM, PST | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Looking for any excuse, Landon Palmer and Scott Beggs are using the 2012 Sight & Sound poll results as a reason to take different angles on the best movies of all time. Every week, they’ll discuss another entry in the list, dissecting old favorites from odd angles, discovering movies they haven’t seen before and asking you to join in on the conversation. Of course it helps if you’ve seen the movie because there will be plenty of spoilers. This week, they visit Pompeii, Sorrento, Naples and Capri alongside a husband and wife who are on the verge of no longer being husband and wife. In the #41 (tied) movie on the list, Roberto Rossellini directs his wife Ingrid Bergman and George Sanders as a foreign place shows them their true natures, intentions and the idea that they may merely be strangers after all. For its generic title, Journey to Italy is anything but. But »

- FSR Staff

Permalink | Report a problem


2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006

14 items from 2014


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners