IMDb > Notorious (1946)
Notorious
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Notorious (1946) More at IMDbPro »

Photos (See all 49 | slideshow) Videos
Notorious -- A woman is asked to spy on a group of Nazi friends in South America. How far will she have to go to ingratiate herself with them?

Overview

User Rating:
8.1/10   58,500 votes »
Your Rating:
Saving vote...
Deleting vote...
/10   (delete | history)
Sorry, there was a problem
MOVIEmeter: ?
Up 4% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writer:
Ben Hecht (written by)
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Notorious on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
6 September 1946 (USA) See more »
Tagline:
Notorious woman of affairs... Adventurous man of the world! See more »
Plot:
A woman is asked to spy on a group of Nazi friends in South America. How far will she have to go to ingratiate herself with them? Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 2 wins & 1 nomination See more »
User Reviews:
Hitchcock's "perfect" movie. See more (267 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Cary Grant ... Devlin

Ingrid Bergman ... Alicia Huberman

Claude Rains ... Alexander Sebastian

Louis Calhern ... Paul Prescott
Leopoldine Konstantin ... Mme. Sebastian (as Madame Konstantin)
Reinhold Schünzel ... 'Dr. Anderson' (as Reinhold Schunzel)
Moroni Olsen ... Walter Beardsley
Ivan Triesault ... Eric Mathis
Alexis Minotis ... Joseph (as Alex Minotis)
Wally Brown ... Mr. Hopkins
Charles Mendl ... Commodore (as Sir Charles Mendl)
Ricardo Costa ... Dr. Barbosa
E.A. Krumschmidt ... Hupka (as Eberhard Krumschmidt)
Fay Baker ... Ethel
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Bernice Barrett ... File Clerk (uncredited)

Bea Benaderet ... File Clerk (uncredited)
Candido Bonsato ... Waiter (uncredited)
Charles D. Brown ... Judge (uncredited)
Eddie Bruce ... Reporter (uncredited)
Paul Bryar ... Photographer (uncredited)
Aileen Carlyle ... Woman at Party (uncredited)
Beulah Christian ... Woman (uncredited)
Richard Clarke ... Man (uncredited)
Tom Coleman ... Court Stenographer (uncredited)
Alfredo DeSa ... Ribero (uncredited)
Ben Erway ... Reporter (uncredited)
Bess Flowers ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Almeda Fowler ... Woman (uncredited)
Gavin Gordon ... Ernest Weylin (uncredited)
William Gordon ... Adams (uncredited)

Virginia Gregg ... File Clerk (uncredited)
Harry Hayden ... Defense Counsel (uncredited)

Alfred Hitchcock ... Man Drinking Champagne at Party (uncredited)
Art Howard ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Warren Jackson ... District Attorney (uncredited)
Ted Kelly ... Waiter (uncredited)
Donald Kerr ... Reporter (uncredited)
James Logan ... Reporter (uncredited)
Leota Lorraine ... Woman (uncredited)
George Lynn ... Photographer (uncredited)
Frank Marlowe ... Photographer (uncredited)
Thomas Martin ... Butler (uncredited)

Frank McClure ... Man Walking Through Door Leaving Courtroom (uncredited)
Francis McDonald ... Man (uncredited)
Tina Menard ... Maid (uncredited)
Howard M. Mitchell ... Bailiff (uncredited)
Bert Moorhouse ... Diner Extra / Party Guest (uncredited)

Antonio Moreno ... Senor Ortiza (uncredited)
Sandra Morgan ... Woman (uncredited)
Howard Negley ... Photographer (uncredited)
Ramon Nomar ... Dr. Silva - Brazilian Official (uncredited)
Fred Nurney ... John Huberman (uncredited)
Garry Owen ... Motorcycle Policeman (uncredited)
Jeffrey Sayre ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Louis Serrano ... Brazilian Official (uncredited)
Patricia Smart ... Mrs. Jackson (uncredited)
Dink Trout ... Court Clerk (uncredited)

Lenore Ulric ... Horsewoman with Sebastian (uncredited)
Emmett Vogan ... Reporter (uncredited)
Friedrich von Ledebur ... Knerr (uncredited)
Peter von Zerneck ... Wilhelm Rossner (uncredited)
John Vosper ... Reporter (uncredited)
Alan Ward ... Reporter (uncredited)
Lillian West ... Woman (uncredited)

Frank Wilcox ... FBI Agent (uncredited)

Elizabeth Wilson ... Woman at Party (uncredited)
Herbert Wyndham ... Mr. Cook (uncredited)
Create a character page for: ?

Directed by
Alfred Hitchcock 
 
Writing credits
Ben Hecht (written by)

John Taintor Foote (story "The Song of the Dragon") uncredited

Alfred Hitchcock  screenplay contributor (uncredited)
Clifford Odets  dialogue: love scenes (uncredited)

Produced by
Alfred Hitchcock .... producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
Roy Webb 
 
Cinematography by
Ted Tetzlaff (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Theron Warth 
 
Art Direction by
Carroll Clark 
Albert S. D'Agostino 
 
Set Decoration by
Claude E. Carpenter (set decorations) (as Claude Carpenter)
Darrell Silvera (set decorations)
 
Makeup Department
Mel Berns .... makeup artist (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
William Dorfman .... assistant director
 
Sound Department
Terry Kellum .... sound
John E. Tribby .... sound
Clem Portman .... sound re-recordist (uncredited)
 
Special Effects by
Paul Eagler .... special effects
Vernon L. Walker .... special effects
 
Visual Effects by
Chris Crowell .... digital compositor (restored version) (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Robert Capa .... still photographer (uncredited)
Gregg Toland .... director of photography: second unit (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Edith Head .... gowns designer: Miss Ingrid Bergman
Eugene Joseff .... costume jeweller (uncredited)
 
Music Department
C. Bakaleinikoff .... musical director
Gil Grau .... orchestral arrangements
 
Other crew
Barbara Keon .... production assistant
Dorothy Barton .... stand-in (uncredited)
Betty Brooks .... stand-in: Ingrid Bergman (uncredited)
Dan Cassell .... stand-in: Cary Grant (uncredited)
J. Dodds .... stand-in (uncredited)
Sam Lufkin .... stand-in (uncredited)
Bill Porter .... publicity writer (uncredited)
Ruth Roberts .... dialogue director (uncredited)
Leo Snell .... stand-in (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributors
Create a character page for: ?

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Alfred Hitchcock's Notorious" - UK (complete title), USA (complete title)
See more »
Runtime:
101 min
Country:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Certification:
Argentina:13 | Australia:PG | Chile:14 | Finland:S | Germany:16 | Iceland:L | Netherlands:18 (original rating) (1947) | Norway:16 (1947) | Peru:14 | Portugal:M/12 (Qualidade) | South Korea:15 (DVD rating) | Spain:18 | Sweden:15 | UK:A (original rating) | UK:U (tv rating) | UK:U (re-release) (re-rating) (2000) (2008) (2012) | UK:U (video rating) (1986) (1992) (1996) (2000) | USA:Approved (PCA #11261)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Alfred Hitchcock claimed that the FBI had him under surveillance for three months because the film dealt with uranium.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: After just arriving in Rio, Alicia and Devlin are drinking at a café. In one shot, Alicia is touching her glass which is still on the table. In the very next shot, she is removing the glass from her lips.See more »
Quotes:
[first lines]
[Title card]:Miami, Florida, Three-Twenty P.M., April the Twenty-Fourth, Nineteen Hundred and Forty-Six...
[reporters and photographers converse amongst themselves outside the courtroom]
Judge:Is there any legal reason why sentence should not be pronounced?
District Attorney:No, your honor.
John Huberman:Yes, I have something to say. You can put me away, but you can't put away what's going to happen to you, and to this whole country next time. Next time we are going...
Defense Counsel:[whispering] I wouldn't say any more. We'll need that for the appeal.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in 'Torn Curtain' Rising (2000) (V)See more »
Soundtrack:
Carnaval, Op. 9, Scènes mignonnes sur quatre notes: 'Chopin'See more »

FAQ

Which scene is the "famous kissing scene"?
How does the movie end?
What is 'Notorious' about?
See more »
134 out of 162 people found the following review useful.
Hitchcock's "perfect" movie., 11 November 2004
Author: FilmSnobby from San Diego

*Notorious* may not be Hitchcock's greatest film, but it may very well be his most perfect film. Rarely is a viewer treated to so much talent in all areas of film creation: Hitch directing, Gregg Toland photographing, Ben Hecht writing, Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman and Claude Rains acting. And everyone is firing on all cylinders.

What gives *Notorious* its singularity amongst the pantheon of Hitchcock's masterpieces is the highly symbolic, literate, and penetrating script by Hecht. Nominally, the film is about the OSS (the pre-natal version of the CIA) using a compromised young daughter of a condemned, unrepentant Nazi to infiltrate a cell of German expatriates in Rio de Janeiro just after the close of the Second World War. The plot hinges on some nonsense involving "uranium ore" stuffed in wine bottles in the cellar of Claude Rains' mansion. In actuality, the film is nothing less than a dark fugue on alcoholism, and secondarily (and of most interest to the director), invasion of privacy. Thirdly, we are treated to some more of the Master's endless fascination with Freudian slop: yet again, we get the Oedipus Complex in all its ardor, with a domineering old bat wielding the motherly whip-hand on Rains' cuckolded, castrated, romantic ex-pat Nazi.

But Hecht is interested primarily in alcoholism, and Hitchcock obligingly complies, utilizing a dizzying myriad of symbols and reference points. In the original script, Bergman's Alicia is something of a whore: the filmmakers were forced by the censors to tone this aspect down, thereby bringing Alicia's dependence on booze to the forefront. Indeed, Bergman spends much of her screen-time woozy-headed, whether from alcohol or poisonous coffee (symbolically functioning as the same thing). Very early in the film, she declares at a party, "The important drinking hasn't started yet!" Exactly. Throughout the movie, Bergman drinks in order to escape her unpleasant circumstances or to wash away bouts of low self-esteem. A bottle of champagne bought by Grant becomes a phallic symbol: he forgets it at the offices of the OSS, with arid results when he arrives home to Bergman. Wine bottles are literally the "key" to the plot. Spilled wine in a sink blows her cover. And late in the proceedings, the simple physical act of drinking -- coffee, yes, but the point comes across -- almost kills her.

There's much more going on here -- too much for a short review, really. Let's finish by asserting that Hitchcock's Forties period was every bit as cinematic as his later, grander, colorized period in the Fifties and Sixties. The slowly swooping shot from the crane, starting from high atop the ceiling of a ballroom and ending up focused on the wine cellar key in Bergman's hand, is merely one famous bravura moment. There are many others:

Grant approaching a hungover Bergman in bed, in which the camera takes her up-ended POV quite literally; Bergman, overcome with poison, hallucinating the figures of Rains and his mother into monstrous shadows that grow larger and larger, eventually merging into one darkness; the two great tracking shots of Grant and Bergman kissing in her Rio apartment and later when Grant rescues her from her poison bed. The trailers for *Notorious* were already calling Hitchcock the "Master of Suspense" . . . it's easy to see why.

As for the performances? Cary Grant proves to be a true soldier, spending much of his screen-time either expressionless or with his back turned to the camera (!), unselfishly giving the film to Bergman, even though his part is actually the more interesting one. Bergman, meanwhile, gives one of the best performances of her illustrious career. No two Bergman roles are quite the same; Hitchcock wisely allows her to do some of her own interpretation, particularly early on during the "character-building" scenes (before the plot moves all the characters into their appointed places on the chessboard). Perhaps best of all, both Grant and Bergman were at the very peak of the physical charms: the movie is some serious eye-candy for both genders. 9 stars out of 10.

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (267 total) »

Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for Notorious (1946)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Claude Rains resembles Richard Dawkins cathy-creswell
Title's Exclamation Mark? atlasmb
I Know The.............. necoleman
The 'riding-club' scene dmjh64
Geography goof in Rio ????? jonjax71
Film Noir ltvx
See more »

Recommendations

If you enjoyed this title, our database also recommends:
- - - - -
The Professional: Golgo 13 Munich Suspicion Giant Madame Bovary
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
Show more recommendations

Related Links

Full cast and crew Company credits External reviews
News articles IMDb top 250 movies IMDb Drama section
IMDb USA section

You may report errors and omissions on this page to the IMDb database managers. They will be examined and if approved will be included in a future update. Clicking the 'Edit page' button will take you through a step-by-step process.