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Navajo Kid (1945)

Approved | | Western | 21 November 1945 (USA)
When Joe Kirk the Indian Agent is murdered, His adopted son Tom Kirk heads out after the killer. Finding gambler Honest John with his father's ring, Tom arrests him. But Honest John found ... See full summary »

Director:

(as Harry Fraser)

Writer:

(original screenplay) (as Harry Fraser)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
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...
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Sheriff Roy Landon (as Edward Cassidy)
Caren Marsh ...
Winifred McMasters
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Matt Crandall
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Bo Talley
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Cactus Hedges (as Charles King Jr.)
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Telegrapher Pinky
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Honest John Grogan
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Storyline

When Joe Kirk the Indian Agent is murdered, His adopted son Tom Kirk heads out after the killer. Finding gambler Honest John with his father's ring, Tom arrests him. But Honest John found the ring on the floor when Crandall, the real killer, played in his card game. Crandall kills Honest John to keep him silent. But Tom now finds the clue that will lead him to the killer. Written by Maurice VanAuken <mvanauken@a1access.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

HE FOUGHT LIKE AN INDIAN..GAMBLED LIKE AN OUTLAW (original ad - all caps)

Genres:

Western

Certificate:

Approved
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

21 November 1945 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Indianernes søn  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This film had its first documented telecast in New York City Tuesday 4 January 1949 on Film Theater of the Air on WCBS (Channel 2). See more »

Connections

Features White Eagle (1941) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Solid Steele Western
24 March 2010 | by (Claremont,USA) – See all my reviews

He may be small (5'5"), but Bob Steele is a human dynamo. Catch his acrobatics mounting a horse or his many adroit brawling moves. Then too, that hard-eyed stare is as good as Eastwood's. No doubt about it, he's a high-energy performer, never boring. Here, he's a white man who's learned Indian ways that he's using to track down his real father after baddies killed his adoptive dad. If that sounds complicated—yeah, I had trouble too. But it doesn't matter. There's some hard riding, a good surprising brawl, and even Saylor's comic relief works pretty well.

One reason to watch is a chance to see two classic Western bad guys in action. I. Stanford Jolley is the long-faced cardsharp, familiar from a hundred of these oaters. He's got a lot of lines and screen time here, but goes uncredited in the cast credits. You wonder why. Then there's rotund Charles King, taking time off from his usual gang boss, as a gang henchman with few lines and not much screen time. So why is he credited, but not Jolley! But pity poor Caren Marsh who doesn't show up until the movie's almost over.

Nothing special here, just a good solid Bob Steele programmer.


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