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Hair-Raising Hare (1946)

Approved | | Animation, Short, Comedy | 25 May 1946 (USA)
A sneaker-wearing, hairy monster chases Bugs through a castle belonging to an evil scientist.

Director:

(as Charles M. Jones)

Writer:

(story)

Star:

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Cast

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Storyline

A wind-up toy in the shapely shape of a female rabbit lures Bugs Bunny out of his rabbit hole and into the castle of an evil scientist who looks exactly like Peter Lorre. The scientist wants to feed the rabbit to his huge, sneaker-wearing monster. The beast, completely covered in orange hair, is frightening enough to leave our hero temporarily speechless - forcing him to hold up a sign that says, "Yipe!" But Bugs Bunny is not easily cowed, and soon the wily rabbit is disguising himself in turns as a lamp, a chatty manicurist, a figure in a framed portrait and a knight on a charging horse, tricking and frustrating his nightmarish opponent at every turn. Written by J. Spurlin

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Details

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Release Date:

25 May 1946 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Angsthase Pfeffernase  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

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Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The orange monster has no name in this cartoon. He is known as Rudolph in Water, Water Every Hare (1952), then as Gossamer in Duck Dodgers and the Return of the 24½th Century (1980). The latter name is the one most familiar to cartoon fans. See more »

Goofs

When Bugs announces that he is going to "...exit, stage right.", he is actually moving stage left; "stage right" and "stage left" are opposite the directions as seen by the audience. Bugs should have said either "stage left" or "house right". See more »

Quotes

Bugs Bunny: Listen, Dracula... Have you ever had the feeling you were being watched? Like the eyes of strange things are upon you? Look, out there in the audience.
Bugs Bunny: [Bug then starts speaking, extra slowly and almost whispers] Look, out there, in the audience.
Gossamer: PEEEE-PLE! Aieeeeeeee!
[Gossamer then runs away through the laboratory walls screaming]
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Crazy Credits

Gossamer ran away, after Bugs Bunny pointed out the theatre audience to Gossamer and cameras, just like its shadow ran away, three minutes earlier that the filming was occurring. Gossamer then ran away, after looking & saying People! in extreme fear or shock. Less than five seconds, after Bugs Bunny scared Gossamer away, Peter Lorre charactered evil-scientist second mechanical rabbit smooches Bugs Bunny & attracts him, Bugs follows it. After saying "So, it's mechanical!" & starts following it, the closing credits & music begin. See more »

Connections

Edited into Bugs Bunny Superstar (1975) See more »

Soundtracks

Headin' for My Beddin'
(uncredited)
Sung by Bugs after re-disposing of the Monster
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
A blast and a great cartoon to watch back to back with its sequel
18 August 2008 | by (Lincoln, England) – See all my reviews

Chuck Jones's 'Hair-Raising Hare' pits Bugs Bunny against a genuinely disturbing Peter Lorre scientist caricature and his huge orange monster. The monster (later named Gossamer and also featured in Jones' luscious sequel to this short, 'Water, Water Every Hare' under the name Rudolph) is an extremely memorable villain who, despite his size, never poses much real threat to Bugs once he turns on his heckling. Although it is not as visually luscious as 'Water, Water Every Hare', Tedd Pierce has turned in a great script which includes some viciously amusing eye-poking, a priceless scene involving a suit of armour and the best "What's up, Doc" joke you'll ever hear. Bugs' wisecracks are top drawer ("Don't go up there, it's dark") and the high energy level is kept up throughout. It's also the only cartoon in which you'll get to hear Gossamer speak. All in all, then, 'Hair-Raising Hare' is a blast and makes a cracking double bill with its less gag-driven sequel.


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