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Gilda (1946) Poster

(1946)

Trivia

When Gilda is brought back to Argentina by Tom, she slaps Johnny hard across both sides of his face. In reality, Rita Hayworth's smacks broke two of Glenn Ford's teeth. He held his place until the take was finished.
There is a rumour that this film is the only time you hear Rita Hayworth's real singing voice but it is sadly not true. According to the bonus features from the DVD, Rita actually never recorded her own singing voice and was a talented lip-syncher. Anita Ellis dubbed almost all of her singing in Gilda (1946). Rita always wanted to do her own singing, and Columbia Pictures chief Harry Cohn paid for her voice lessons, but she never developed a voice he considered strong enough to be used, and Rita remained bitter about that for the rest of her life.
Rita Hayworth had to wear a corset while shooting "Put the Blame on Mame," as she had given birth to her first daughter, Rebecca Welles, months before filming.
According to the commentary provided on TCM following the showing of Gilda, Anita Ellis did voice the big production song "Put the Blame on Mame"; however, Rita Hayworth was indeed singing that song in the scene where she is strumming the guitar at the bar.
Selected by the Library of Congress for preservation in the National Film Registry in December 2013.
The movie's poster was as #6 of "The 25 Best Movie Posters Ever" by Premiere.
The photo of Johnny Farrell as a baby is a picture of Glenn Ford's real-life son, Peter Ford.
Jean Louis's inspiration for Gilda's black dress was John Singer Sargent's controversial 1884 'Portrait of Madame X', now in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, NYC.
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In the V-E Day scene, the crowd in the Casino is singing the 'Marcha de San Lorenzo' (San Lorenzo's March), instead of the Argentine national anthem (which would have been the logical theme to sing at that occasion). This piece of music honors a famous battle in Argentine history, and is usually played only in the festivities related to Argentine hero José de San Martín.
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Michael Jackson was digitally added during Rita Hayworth's performance for his This Is It concert. The clip was to be shown to the audience during the Smooth Criminal performance.
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'Gilda' was briefly shown in "The Shawshank Redemption", which was based on the Stephen King novella "Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption", both of which use a poster of Rita Hayworth as a Chekhov's Gun.
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Included among the "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die", edited by Steven Schneider.
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While 'Gilda' was in release, an atomic bomb tested at Bikini Atoll in the Pacific Ocean's Marshall Islands beared image of Hayworth, a reference to her bombshell status. The fourth atomic bomb ever to be detonated was decorated with a photograph of Hayworth cut from the June 1946 issue of Esquire magazine. Above it was stenciled the device's nickname, "Gilda", in two-inch black letters. Although the gesture was meant as a compliment, Hayworth was deeply offended.
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In TV sitcom "Everybody Loves Raymond", there is an episode in which Debra Barone sings "Put the blame on mame".
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Gilda was an inspiration for the character of Jessica Rabbit.
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Rita Hayworth's introductory scene was shot twice. While the action of her popping her head into the frame and the subsequent dialogue remains the same, she is dressed in different costumes - in a striped blouse and dark skirt in one film print, and the more famous off-the-shoulder dressing gown in the other.
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The two songs Hayworth sings in Gilda, "Put the Blame on Mame" and "Amado Mio," were written by Doris Fisher and Allan Roberts. The songwriting team also composed the entire song score for Hayworth's next film, Down to Earth (1947), as well as "Please Don't Kiss Me," the sole number Rita Hayworth performed in Orson Welles' The Lady from Shanghai (1947).
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Gilda was such an enormous financial success for Columbia Pictures that Rita Hayworth's agent, Johnny Hyde, demanded that studio chief Harry Cohn give his client a share of profits for subsequent pictures. Cohn refused, but when Hayworth called in "sick" for several days during production of her next film, Down to Earth, Cohn relented. Hayworth formed the Beckworth Corporation to collect twenty-five percent of the net profits from the remaining films on her Columbia contract.
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Bogart declined the role of Johnny Farrell in what was to become a classic film noir and huge box-office hit. He reasoned that, with gorgeous Rita Hayworth playing Gilda, audiences wouldn't look at anyone else.
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According to an article in the Los Angeles Examiner in 1945, Goulding was initially attached to direct.
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The character of Gilda was so famous that Rita Hayworth once stated:"They fell in love with Gilda and woke up with me."
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This role made Rita Hayworth into a cultural icon as a femme fatale.
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The two-piece costume worn by Hayworth in the "Amado Mio" nightclub sequence was sold for $161,000.
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Geri Halliwell from the Spice Girls is featured in the music video for their 1997 single "Too Much" in a black-and-white scene based on Rita Hayworth's performance in the film.
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Opening credits: The characters and incidents portrayed and the names used herein are fictitious, and any similarity to the name, character or history of any person is entirely accidental and unintentional.
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Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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