IMDb > Cloak and Dagger (1946)
Cloak and Dagger
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Cloak and Dagger (1946) More at IMDbPro »

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Down 60% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Albert Maltz (screenplay) and
Ring Lardner Jr. (screenplay) ...
View company contact information for Cloak and Dagger on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
28 September 1946 (USA) See more »
RELENTLESS SUSPENSE! (original ad - all caps) See more »
In WW2, the Allies race against time to persuade two nuclear scientists working for the Nazis to switch sides. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
User Reviews:
has its moments See more (26 total) »


  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Gary Cooper ... Prof. Alvah Jesper

Lilli Palmer ... Gina
Robert Alda ... Pinkie
Vladimir Sokoloff ... Polda
J. Edward Bromberg ... Trenk
Marjorie Hoshelle ... Ann Dawson
Ludwig Stössel ... The German (as Ludwig Stossel)
Helene Thimig ... Katerin Lodor (as Helen Thimig)
Dan Seymour ... Marsoli

Marc Lawrence ... Luigi
James Flavin ... Col. Walsh
Patrick O'Moore ... The Englishman (as Pat O'Moore)
Charles Marsh ... Erich
rest of cast listed alphabetically:

Lex Barker ... Man Rescued at End (uncredited)
Eugene Borden ... Inspector (uncredited)
Paul Bradley ... Bit Role (uncredited)
Frederic Brunn ... German (uncredited)
Michael Burke ... OSS Agent (uncredited)
Robert Coote ... Cronin (uncredited)
Hella Crossley ... Rachel (uncredited)
Elvira Curci ... Woman in Street (uncredited)
Albert D'Arno ... Desk Clerk (uncredited)

Yola d'Avril ... First Nurse (uncredited)
Carl Deloro ... Ovra Man (uncredited)
Vernon Downing ... British Sergeant (uncredited)
Claire Du Brey ... Second Nurse (uncredited)
Eddie Dunn ... French Wireless Operator (uncredited)
Eric Feldary ... German (uncredited)
Bruce Fernald ... Walsh's Assistant (uncredited)
Ross Ford ... Paratrooper (uncredited)
Art Foster ... Canadian Commander (uncredited)
Richard Fraser ... British Submarine Skipper (uncredited)
Arno Frey ... German Soldier (uncredited)
Frederick Giermann ... Bank Manager (uncredited)
Henry Guttman ... German (uncredited)
Holmes Herbert ... British Officer (uncredited)
Guy Kingsford ... British Commander (uncredited)
Charles La Torre ... Janitor (uncredited)
Marten Lamont ... Canadian Runner (uncredited)
Bruce Lester ... British Officer (uncredited)
Lynne Lyons ... Woman in Bank (uncredited)
Rory Mallinson ... Paul (uncredited)
Anthony Marsh ... Radio Operator (uncredited)

Frank Mayo ... French Spy (uncredited)
Peter Michael ... German Agent (uncredited)
Marie Monteil ... Nun (uncredited)
Neyle Morrow ... Pietro - Radioman at Hut (uncredited)
John Mylong ... German Captain (uncredited)
Lillian Nicholson ... Nun (uncredited)
Paul Panzer ... Waiter (uncredited)
Eddie Parker ... Gestapo Agent (uncredited)
Gil Perkins ... Gestapo Agent (uncredited)
Otto Reichow ... German Soldier (uncredited)
Julian Rivero ... Punaro - Owner of Hut (uncredited)
Ramon Ros ... Driver (uncredited)
John Royce ... Bellhop (uncredited)
Bobby Santon ... Italian Boy (uncredited)
Hector V. Sarno ... Proprietor (uncredited)
Leonardo Scavino ... Italian Soldier (uncredited)
Hans Schumm ... German Agent (uncredited)
Dan Sheridan ... British Adjutant (uncredited)
George Sorel ... Ovra Man (uncredited)
Ray Spiker ... German (uncredited)
Lotte Stein ... Loder's Nurse-Guard (uncredited)
Robert R. Stephenson ... Photographer (uncredited)
Don Turner ... Lingg (uncredited)
Hans von Morhart ... German (uncredited)
Regina Wallace ... Cashier (uncredited)
Richard Walsh ... American Sergeant (uncredited)
Douglas Walton ... British Pilot (uncredited)
Leo White ... Room Service Waiter (uncredited)
Crane Whitley ... Switchman (uncredited)

Frank Wilcox ... American Officer (uncredited)
Clifton Young ... American Commander (uncredited)
Victor Zimmerman ... Bartender (uncredited)

Directed by
Fritz Lang 
Writing credits
Albert Maltz (screenplay) and
Ring Lardner Jr. (screenplay)

Boris Ingster (original story) and
John Larkin (original story)

Corey Ford (suggested by the book) and
Alastair MacBain (suggested by the book)

Produced by
Milton Sperling .... producer
Original Music by
Max Steiner 
Cinematography by
Sol Polito (director of photography)
Film Editing by
Christian Nyby 
Art Direction by
Max Parker 
Set Decoration by
Walter F. Tilford (set decorations) (as Walter Tilford)
Makeup Department
Perc Westmore .... makeup artist
Bill Cooley .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Myrl Stoltz .... hair stylist (uncredited)
Eddie Voight .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Production Management
Frank Mattison .... unit manager (uncredited)
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Russell Saunders .... assistant director (uncredited)
Art Department
Donald P. Desmond .... set constructor (uncredited)
Walter Douglas .... assistant props (uncredited)
John More .... props (uncredited)
Sound Department
Francis J. Scheid .... sound
Special Effects by
Harry Barndollar .... special effects director
Edwin B. DuPar .... special effects
Lynne Lyons .... stunt double (uncredited)
Eddie Parker .... stunts (uncredited)
Gil Perkins .... stunts (uncredited)
Camera and Electrical Department
Larry Cairns .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Pat Clark .... still photographer (uncredited)
Al Green .... second camera (uncredited)
Harold Noyes .... grip (uncredited)
Charles O'Bannon .... gaffer (uncredited)
Richard L. Wilson .... best boy (uncredited)
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Leah Rhodes .... wardrobe
Henry Field .... wardrobe (uncredited)
Eugene Joseff .... jeweller (uncredited)
Music Department
Leo F. Forbstein .... musical director
Hugo Friedhofer .... orchestral arrangements
Other crew
Michael Burke .... technical adviser
Polly Craus .... script clerk (uncredited)
Andreis Deinum .... technical advisor (uncredited)
Crew believed to be complete

Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies
  • Office of Strategic Services (OSS)  this picture has been inspired by the amazing achievements of, but no part of it is intended as a portrayal of actual events (as the OSS)

Additional Details

Also Known As:
106 min
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Argentina:13 | Finland:K-16 | Portugal:M/12 | UK:A (original rating) | UK:PG (video rating) (1990) (1998) (2008) | USA:Approved (MPAA rating: certificate #11630) | West Germany:12 (f)

Did You Know?

According to the book 'The Films of World War II' by Joe Morella, Edward Z. Epstein and John Griggs (1973), "This film is significant because of its attitude and treatment of the subject of nuclear weapons...In the version seen by the public the film ends with [Gary] Cooper completing his mission, rescuing the Italian scientist and accompanying him back to the Allies. He leaves Lilli Palmer behind him but it is implied he will return for her after the war. Director [Fritz] Lang has said that in the original ending the scientist dies on the plane and the British and U.S. secret service men must further pursue the Nazis. From a photo left by the scientist they surmise that the Nazis have an installation in Bavaria. They find the site has been abandoned and there is dialogue to this effect: 'Probably the plant is in Argentina now - or somewhere.' Lang has stated that the final fadeout had Cooper walking out of the abandoned cave seeing an American soldier. The sun is shining, birds are singing and Cooper says, 'This is the Year One of the Atomic Age and God help us if we think we can keep this secret from the world, and keep it for ourselves.' According to the director, the entire fourth reel was cut and probably doesn't exist any longer. He assumes that Warners cut his ending because it was too soon after the bombs had been dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki."See more »
Movie Connections:
Spoofed in Top Secret! (1984)See more »
Geschichten aus dem Wienerwald (Tales from the Vienna Woods), Op. 325See more »


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3 out of 4 people found the following review useful.
has its moments, 18 October 2008
Author: hickey2 from United States

While this is probably the first Fritz Lang film I wasn't overwhelmingly impressed with (well, maybe Siegfried, too), it does have a couple of things that make it really worth watching. Cooper's fury as a scientist early on in the movie railing against the amount of money the government pays for the development of killing machines, as opposed to curing diseases and making the world a better place, is beautiful and gave me chills. It's an incredibly powerful expression of grief and outrage in the wake of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki (this movie came out only a year after the end of the war). Also, there's an INCREDIBLE fight scene late in the movie, in which Cooper's character (who's really a professor, and just an ordinary man, not a hardened fighter) struggles with an Italian spy. I don't think Lang is known for his fight scenes, but this one is a masterpiece. There's no Jackie Chan flying over tables, swinging on chandeliers, or kicking people through walls; instead, you have an ordinary man struggling with a somewhat superior opponent, in a very realistic, very brutal fight scene. A lot of small, practical self-defense moves I remember my dad teaching me when I was young are employed in this fight, including stomping on someone's instep and a couple of simple arm grapples. The action is extremely believable and practical, and the combat is savage, between two men fighting desperately for their lives. No one watches Fritz Lang movies for the fight scenes, but this one's really one of the highlights of this otherwise "eh" film--it's extremely well-done, and very surprising for a 1940s movie.

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