MOVIEmeter
SEE RANK
Down 6,178 this week

The Brute Man (1946)

3.6
Your rating:
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Ratings: 3.6/10 from 703 users  
Reviews: 27 user | 11 critic

A facially deformed and mentally unhinged man wreaks his revenge on those who deformed him with a series of brutal murders.

Director:

0Check in
0Share...

User Lists

Related lists from IMDb users

a list of 199 titles
created 30 Jan 2011
 
a list of 19 titles
created 25 Mar 2011
 
a list of 131 titles
created 12 Apr 2011
 
a list of 192 titles
created 03 Mar 2013
 
a list of 40 titles
created 1 month ago
 

Connect with IMDb


Share this Rating

Title: The Brute Man (1946)

The Brute Man (1946) on IMDb 3.6/10

Want to share IMDb's rating on your own site? Use the HTML below.

Take The Quiz!

Test your knowledge of The Brute Man.

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview:
Rondo Hatton ...
Hal Moffet AKA 'The Creeper'
Tom Neal ...
Jan Wiley ...
...
Donald MacBride ...
Police Captain M. J. Donelly
Peter Whitney ...
Police Lieutenant Gates
Fred Coby ...
Young Hal Moffet
Janelle Johnson Dolenz ...
Joan Bemis (as Ja Nelle Johnson)
Edit

Storyline

Hal Moffat who is taking wholesale revenge by murdering those he holds responsible for his predicament, is befriended by Helen Paige, a blind piano teacher, and he develops a warmth for her that leads him to add thievery and robbery - no big deal, he is out there anyway - to his murders so that she can be provided with the money for an operation. Written by Les Adams <longhorn1939@suddenlink.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

His brain cried "Kill, kill, kill!" See more »

Genres:

Drama | Horror | Thriller

Certificate:

Unrated
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

1 October 1946 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Brute Man  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Rondo Hatton, who played the monstrous Creeper in this film and in House of Horrors (1946), was actually handsome as a young man, but later in life became disfigured by acromegaly, a form of gigantism brought about by unnaturally high levels of human growth hormone produced by a disease of the pituitary gland. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Police Dispatcher: Attention all cars, attention all cars: general alarm. Car 22, go to 733 Spring Avenue, it's a 341, that is all.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Cinemassacre's Monster Madness: The Brain (2009) See more »

Soundtracks

Liebestraum No 2 A Sharp Minor
(uncredited)
Music by Franz Liszt
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Rondo Hatton's Finest Hour
6 September 2009 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Rondo Hatton was a former reporter who began acting in films in 1930 when he was covering a film being made in Florida. During the 30s and 40s he was mainly seen in small roles, often as hulks, due to his large body size and the fact the he had contracted acromegaly after being gassed during the first world war. In 1944 he was cast as The Hoxton Creeper in a Sherlock Holmes film, The Pearl of Death, and achieved brief stardom-or at least cult stardom-until his early death from a heart attack at age 52 in 1946 (he had suffered a milder heart attack the previous year as a direct result of his condition).

In this, one of his last films, not only does Hatton get the starring role, he has a great deal of dialogue and proves that he could be a good actor when given the chance. It is unusual for audiences to feel as much sympathy for a killer-especially one who has killed several times-but we do for Hatton. His scenes with Jane Adams, playing Helen, the blind piano teacher, are especially moving. Helen sees the inner man without being able to see the physical one, and although as I said he's a killer he gives the impression of a very human, tragic figure. Helen wants to touch his face, but he won't let her; this gives one a strong impression of a mirroring of the life of the actor himself. Just like the character he plays, Rondo Hatton was an athlete when younger, and excelled at football.

All of the cast play their parts well. Donald MacBride, frequently cast as the dumb cop, plays a very canny and intelligent one here, and he's ably supported by Peter Whitney-looking handsome and slim!-as Police Lieutenant Gates. The photography is well-done-especially considering the budget (or lack thereof) and there are some nice angles and lighting, especially when Hatton is prowling around the city.

Note: This film was actually made at Universal, who sold the rights to it to PRC shortly after it was completed (and Rondo Hatton died).


20 of 20 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
Rondo Hatton heathcliff13
Janelle Johnson mother of Micky Dolenz chongajuly
The Old Shopkeep ngobleus
Discuss The Brute Man (1946) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?