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1-20 of 48 items from 2013   « Prev | Next »


The Long Goodbye

21 December 2013 4:06 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

(Robert Altman, 1973, Arrow Academy, 15)

Like Raymond Chandler, Robert Altman (1925-2006) was a difficult, hard-drinking, self-destructive artist, a brilliant maverick who achieved his first success late in life. In 1973, his career still in the ascendant after the popularity of his first expansive, widescreen movie, Mash, he made a controversial screen version of Chandler's last work of consequence.

Published in 1953, The Long Good-bye was arguably Chandler's best, certainly his most personal novel and turned upon his knight-errant private eye Philip Marlowe going down the mean streets of Los Angeles to defend the reputation of his friend Terry Lennox, who's accused of murdering his wife before apparently committing suicide in Mexico.

Altman brought in Leigh Brackett, co-screenwriter with William Faulkner on the 1946 film of Chandler's The Big Sleep. His big changes were to simplify the plot and, above all, to bring forward the action some two decades from the conformist early 50s to the permissive 70s. »

- Philip French

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Why we need to re-evaluate the films we once called great

19 December 2013 5:37 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Nobody wants to rock the boat when it comes to reassessing the classics, but face facts: Gregory's Girl is clunky, 2001: A Space Odyssey is never-ending, while Dirty Dancing is still brilliant

A few weeks ago I watched The Searchers, the 1956 John Ford horse opera that is routinely described by critics as one of the greatest films of all time. In 2008 the American Film Institute named it the finest western ever, as well as the 12th best American movie, while the British Film Institute slotted it in at number seven on the all-time greatest list.

Are these guys serious? The Searchers, which deals with a mysterious, morally ambivalent Johnny Reb's relentless quest to find – and perhaps kill – a niece abducted by marauding Comanches, is padded out to epic length with all sorts of daffy comedy. The gags and slapstick fistfights undercut the serious message of the film: that most white »

- Joe Queenan

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The Long Goodbye Blu-Ray Review

13 December 2013 2:00 AM, PST | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Director: Robert Altman

Starring: Elliott GouldNina van PallandtSterling HaydenMark Rydell and Henry Gibson

Certificate: 12

Running Time: 112 minutes

Synopsis: When private eye Philip Marlowe (Elliott Gould) is visited by an old friend, this sets in train a series of events in which he’s hired to search for a missing novelist (Sterling Hayden) and finds himself on the wrong side of vicious gangsters. So far so faithful to Raymond Chandler, but Robert Altman’s inspired adaptation of the writer’s most personal novel takes his legendary detective and relocates him to the selfish, hedonistic culture of 1970s Hollywood, where he finds that his old-fashioned notions of honour and loyalty carry little weight, and even his smoking (universal in film noir) is now frowned upon.

Even without knowing much about the brooding book series by Raymond Chandler, the character of gumshoe Philip Marlowe is one of those literary icons »

- Craig Hunter

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Suit Yourself: Elliot Gould in The Long Goodbye

11 December 2013 10:46 PM, PST | Clothes on Film | See recent Clothes on Film news »

Newly released on collectable Blu-ray, The Long Goodbye (1973, directed by Robert Altman) is the kind of film you feel ashamed for not watching more often. Starring Elliot Gould as Raymond Chandler’s pulp private dick Phillip Marlowe, this is a quirky, very seventies re-imagining of the Humphrey Bogart man-in-a-trenchcoat myth. The film is contemporary set, yet Gould’s Marlowe is a man out of place and time. Everything from his car to apartment to clothes is indicative of the P.I’s golden age; a world of cocktails, dames and pinstripe suits, not cat food, hippies and polyester.

Hollywood’s effortless private detective was created in the post-Prohibition era of the 1930s-40s, and into the 50’s. The noir stories of The Thin Man (1934), The Maltese Falcon (1941), The Big Sleep (1946), Kiss Me Deadly (1955) and beyond were characterised by a hero – generally not an anti-hero despite the dark tone – who dressed and acted a certain way. »

- Christopher Laverty

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Top 10 film noir

29 November 2013 8:20 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Guns, dames and hats: you can't have a film noir without them, can you? Take a look at the Guardian and Observer critics list of the best 10 noirs and you'll realise things aren't that simple …

• Top 10 westerns

• Top 10 documentaries

• Top 10 movie adaptations

• Top 10 animated movies

• Top 10 silent movies

• Top 10 sports movies

• More Guardian and Observer critics' top 10s

10. They Live by Night

Nicholas Ray's astonishingly self-assured, lyrical directorial debut opens with title cards and lush orchestrations over shots of a boy and a girl in rapturous mutual absorption: "This boy … and this gir … were never properly introduced … to the world we live in …" A shriek of horns suddenly obliterates all other sound – their shocked faces both turn toward the camera, and the title appears: They Live by Night.

Meet 23-year-old escaped killer Bowie Bowers and his farm-girl sweetheart Keechie Mobley (Farley Granger and Cathy O'Donnell), in an imaginary idyll »

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Moments That Made the Movies by David Thomson – review

18 November 2013 1:01 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

David Thomson's book of his favourite film moments is highly subjective and full of wit and insight

Born in London in 1941, resident in America since the early 1970s, David Thomson has been one of the liveliest, most literate, productive, provocative and daring movie critics for more than 40 years, his books ranging from a definitive biography of David O Selznick to an intrusively speculative monograph on Nicole Kidman. He has studied whole careers, single films and now he's down to choosing single key moments.

This would have pleased the gloriously named John Bickerson "Binx" Bolling, narrator of The Moviegoer, Walker Percy's philosophical novel that won the 1962 Us National Book award. Binx is a laid-back Louisiana stockbroker from old New Orleans money, and is, he says, "quite happy in a movie, even a bad movie". In fact, movies are more memorable to him than so-called real life. "Other people," he observes, »

- Philip French

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Top 10 movie adaptations

15 November 2013 8:32 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Books and films have been joined at the hip ever since the earliest days of cinema, and adaptations of novels have regularly provided audiences with the classier end of the film spectrum. Here, the Guardian and Observer's critics pick the 10 best

• Top 10 family movies

• Top 10 war movies

• Top 10 teen movies

• Top 10 superhero movies

• Top 10 westerns

• Top 10 documentaries

• More Guardian and Observer critics' top 10s

10. Planet of the Apes

Although the source novel, La Planète des Singes, was written by Frenchman Pierre Boule and originally reached its futureshock climax in Paris, this enduring sci-fi fantasy is profoundly American, putting Charlton Heston's steel-jawed patriotism to incredible use. It also holds up surprisingly well as a jarring allegory for the population's fears over escalating cold war tensions.

Beginning with a spaceship crash-landing on an unknown planet after years of cryogenic sleep, Franklin J Schaffner's film soon gets into gear as Heston's upstanding »

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Top 10 movie adaptations

15 November 2013 8:32 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Books and films have been joined at the hip ever since the earliest days of cinema, and adaptations of novels have regularly provided audiences with the classier end of the film spectrum. Here, the Guardian and Observer's critics pick the 10 best

• Top 10 family movies

• Top 10 war movies

• Top 10 teen movies

• Top 10 superhero movies

• Top 10 westerns

• Top 10 documentaries

• More Guardian and Observer critics' top 10s

10. Planet of the Apes

Although the source novel, La Planète des Singes, was written by Frenchman Pierre Boule and originally reached its futureshock climax in Paris, this enduring sci-fi fantasy is profoundly American, putting Charlton Heston's steel-jawed patriotism to incredible use. It also holds up surprisingly well as a jarring allegory for the population's fears over escalating cold war tensions.

Beginning with a spaceship crash-landing on an unknown planet after years of cryogenic sleep, Franklin J Schaffner's film soon gets into gear as Heston's upstanding »

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Ernest & Celestine Announces English Language Voice Cast

8 November 2013 1:07 PM, PST | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Gkids, a distributor of award-winning animation for both adult and family audiences, has announced the English voice cast for Ernest & Celestine, the charming and beautifully hand-drawn new feature from the creators of the Academy Award nominated The Triplets Of Belleville and The Secret of Kells. Ernest & Celestine premiered at Cannes, has played Toronto, London, Los Angeles and other prestigious film festivals, is the winner of France's Cesar Award for Best Animated Feature and numerous festival prizes, and currently has a 100% rating on RottenTomatoes.com.

Gkids is qualifying the film for the Academy Awards in the Best Animated Feature category, where the company has had past success with The Secret of Kells, A Cat in Paris and Chico & Rita.

The just-completed English language voice cast includes Academy Award, Emmy, Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild Award winner Forest Whitaker (Lee Daniels' the Butler), Mackenzie Foy (Mackenzie Foy), Academy Award and Emmy »

- MovieWeb

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Blu-ray Review: 'Red River' (MoC)

29 October 2013 8:18 AM, PDT | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

★★★☆☆Before 1948's Red River, Howard Hawks had already made half a dozen classics including Scarface, Bringing Up Baby, His Girl Friday and The Big Sleep. A decade later, Hawks would direct one of the great westerns - Rio Bravo (1959). Whilst Red River isn't quite of the same calibre as these other works, it's certainly not without its charms. A prologue shows Thomas Dunson (John Wayne) founding his Texas ranch alongside his trusted companion Groot (Walter Brennan) and young orphan Matt Garth. As Dunson describes his plans for expansion, a montage takes us forward another 14 years.

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- CineVue UK

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Is Jack Kerouac Unfilmable? 'Big Sur' is the Latest to Raise the Question

29 October 2013 8:10 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Certain written works notoriously avoid being turned into successful films: "War and Peace," "Gravity’s Rainbow," basically anything by William Faulkner (exempting the screenplay he wrote for "The Big Sleep") and "The Great Gatsby," as Baz Luhrmann's attempt this year recently reconfirmed. Jack Kerouac has been part of this sequestration – until now. The past 12 months have seen the release of two Kerouac adaptations: Walter Salles' "On the Road" in December of last year, followed by Michael Polish's "Big Sur" this Friday. Additionally, "Kill Your Darlings," which opened earlier this month, is based on the true story of a murder within Kerouac’s proto-Beat clique during the early stirrings of that movement. It's understandable why Kerouac has eluded cinematic adaptation. He was king of the Beats, immortalized in his own characters Sal Paradise and Jack Duluoz, founder of a literary movement, creator of an aesthetic style, and perpetrator »

- Gabrielle Lipton

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Original Draft Of 'Empire Strikes Back' Featured A Drunken Dinner With Darth Vader & More

25 October 2013 11:58 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

The Internet is in a tizzy over Michael Arndt's exit from "Star Wars: Episode VII," to be replaced by Lawrence Kasdan and J.J. Abrams. But as Mike Ryan points out at The Huffington Post, this isn't the first time in the franchise that a writer was replaced by another writer and the film's director, as he looks at the script for "Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back." You know, the one before George Lucas and Kasdan got their hands on it. To explain: after the success of the original "Star Wars," Lucas found himself overwhelmed and without the time or energy to fully flesh out his ideas for the subsequent films. He then hired Leigh Brackett, who co-wrote the Bogart/Bacall classic "The Big Sleep," but Brackett not only turned in a lousy draft but had the audacity to die before Lucas could commission rewrites from her.As Ryan recounts, »

- Drew Taylor

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ABC Picks Up Untitled Phillip Marlowe Series From ‘Castle’ Creator

21 October 2013 5:12 PM, PDT | ScreenRant.com | See recent Screen Rant news »

Murder, My Sweet. Farewell My Lovely. The Big Sleep. These three stories all share one thing in common; Phillip Marlowe. Back in the 1940s, Raymond Chandler’s book series about a private investigator named Phillip Marlowe was adapted into successful films starring actors such as Dick Powell and Humphrey Bogart. Now almost 75 years since he first appeared in literature, Marlowe is being adapted once again for a new generation.

ABC Studios has picked up an Untitled Phillip Marlowe Project from Castle creator/showrunner Andrew Marlowe and producer Michael De Luca (Fifty Shades of Grey). Deadline states that the show will be “a smart, sexy and stylish update ...

Click to continue reading ABC Picks Up Untitled Phillip Marlowe Series From ‘Castle’ Creator

The post ABC Picks Up Untitled Phillip Marlowe Series From ‘Castle’ Creator appeared first on Screen Rant.

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- Al Mannarino

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Philip Marlowe Returns To TV In A Sexy, Stylish Update

21 October 2013 8:41 AM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

As we all know, sexiness did not exist as a concept until at least 2005, and stylishness is a contemporary invention. So is it any wonder that any and all properties created before the millennium are in need of a ‘sexy, stylish update’? This is apparently true for hard-boiled detective Philip Marlowe, created all the way back in 1939 (no one was Alive back then!) by novelist Raymond Chandler. Marlowe has been a staple of screen and television ever since, and now will return to the small screen at least in an update from Castle creator Andrew Marlowe (no relation).

The Marlowe show is in development at ABC under the guidance of Andrew Marlowe, Castle writer Terri Edda Miller, and producer Michael De Luca (Captain Phillips). The show will be an update of the wisecracking detective, bringing him into the modern era and avoiding all those nasty pitfalls of trying to recreate »

- Lauren Humphries-Brooks

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ABC Plans Philip Marlowe Series Update

19 October 2013 8:55 AM, PDT | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

ABC is developing a contemporary TV series based on Raymond Chandler's iconic detective character Philip Marlowe.

"Castle" showrunner Andrew Marlowe and one of that show's scribes Terri Edda Miller are co-writing the script. The pair will executive produce with Michael De Luca.

The original hard-boiled, wise-cracking private dick explored the darker side of Los Angeles in cases that were famously complicated. The new take is called a "sexy and stylish" update set in modern times.

Various people have played the character from Dick Powell in the 1940s to Powers Boothe in a 1980s TV series, though the most iconic version remains Humphrey Bogart's take in the stone cold cinema classic "The Big Sleep".

Source: Variety »

- Garth Franklin

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'Castle' creator developing a Philip Marlowe show for ABC

18 October 2013 4:12 PM, PDT | Zap2It - From Inside the Box | See recent Zap2It - From Inside the Box news »

The creator of "Castle," Andrew Marlowe, is developing another detective show for ABC -- this one not about a writer but a famous literary character.

Marlowe and his wife, "Castle" writer-producer Terri Edda Miller, are developing a show together based on Raymond Chandler's private eye Philip Marlowe. Producer Michael De Luca ("Captain Phillips") is also involved.

The new project would bring Marlowe into the 21st century while retaining Chandler's world-weary edge. Andrew Marlowe and Miller will have plenty of source material on which to draw -- Chandler wrote nine novels and several short stories featuring the character.

ABC developed a Marlowe series in 2006-07 that starred Jason O'Mara, but the pilot didn't make it to series. The character has been featured in numerous movies, most famously "The Big Sleep" with Humphrey Bogart, and a couple of TV series as well. The most recent one was "Philip Marlowe, Private Eye, »

- editorial@zap2it.com

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ABC is developing a contemporary Philip Marlowe series

18 October 2013 2:10 PM, PDT | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

Castle showrunner Andrew Marlowe is developing a new show for ABC, based on Raymond Chandler’s famous (unrelated) detective Philip Marlowe. Marlowe and Castle writer Terri Edda Miller are penning the script, which is described as a “sexy and stylish” update on the wisecracking, Los Angeles-based private eye who frequently finds himself embroiled in dangerous dealings on the wrong side of the tracks. Chandler's Marlowe-related work has already been adapted into some really great movies, including 1944’s Murder, My Sweet, 1946’s The Big Sleep with Humphrey Bogart, and Robert Altman's The Long Goodbye in 1973, with »

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ABC Sets Philip Marlowe Drama from ‘Castle’s’ Andrew Marlowe

18 October 2013 1:10 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

ABC is developing a contempo spin on Raymond Chandler’s enduring gumshoe Philip Marlowe, shepherded by “Castle” showrunner Andrew Marlowe and Michael De Luca.

Fellow “Castle” scribe Terri Edda Miller is co-writing the script with Marlowe (pictured above with Miller). The pair exec produce for ABC Studios with De Luca, a film vet who has become active in TV in recent years.

Marlowe and MIller’s spin on the hard-boiled, wise-cracking private eye is described as a “sexy and stylish” update on the character whose job famously took him into the seamy side of the City of Angels. The bar is high for scribes and prospective stars, because it’ll be hard to top the work of Dick Powell in the 1944 pic adaptation of “Murder, My Sweet” or Humphrey Bogart in 1946′s “The Big Sleep.”

Marlowe has been the showrunner of ABC’s “Castle,” the murder-mystery drama starring Nathan Fillion, »

- Cynthia Littleton

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Scoop: Castle Creator Developing Philip Marlowe Detective Series for ABC

18 October 2013 1:00 PM, PDT | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

Castle creator Andrew Marlowe is expanding his detective empire.

Marlowe and wife/Castle writer and consulting producer Terri Edda Miller, along with Michael De Luca (Mob City), are working on an hour-long drama featuring Raymond Chandler’s Philip Marlowe character for ABC.

Related | Sneak Peek: Can Castle Solve the Mystery of Pi?

Described as “sexy” and “stylish,” the new project follows the wisecracking, private eye in modern-day Los Angeles, “where true love can be more difficult to find than justice.”

The character appears in several of Chandler’s novels, including The Big Sleep and The Long Goodbye, and has previously appeared on the small screen. »

- Michael Ausiello

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In the Works: 'Philip Marlowe' Series by 'Castle' Creators and Michael De Luca, Inspired by Raymond Chandler's Famed Private Eye

18 October 2013 1:00 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Raymond Chandler fans, take note. Michael De Luca, Andrew Marlowe and Terri Edda Miller have sold a one-hour drama inspired by Chandler's famed detective Philip Marlowe to ABC. The casting director will have a tall order in finding the right actor to play Marlowe, a witty, no-bullshit tough guy who still has compassion for the failings of his fellow men. Previous big-screen Marlowes have been played by the likes of -- most famously -- Humphrey Bogart (Howard Hawks' "The Big Sleep"), Elliott Gould (Robert Altman's "The Long Goodbye") and Robert Mitchum (Dick Richards' "Farewell, My Lovely," and Michael Winner's 1978 version of "The Big Sleep"). Dick Powell and Robert Montgomery were Marlowes, too. Here's more info:This smart, sexy and stylish update of Raymond Chandler’s timeless character follows the investigations of wisecracking, edgy and rugged private detective Philip Marlowe, as he navigates the morally complicated world of today’s Los Angeles, »

- Beth Hanna

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1-20 of 48 items from 2013   « Prev | Next »


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