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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2004 | 2001

10 items from 2015


'True Detective' and the Shady History of California Noir

22 June 2015 11:55 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

There are few more evocative first lines in 20th-century American literature than that of James M. Cain's 1934 novel, The Postman Always Rings Twice. "They threw me off the hay truck about noon," begins the book's narrator, an amoral drifter named Frank Chambers. He soon finds himself near a roadside sandwich joint called the Twin Oaks Tavern, a spot that, Chambers says, is "like a million others in California." But bad things happen at this rural little diner — things like adultery, kinky sex and first-degree murder. The book's sinister series »

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Tcmff 2015: ‘Nightmare Alley’ is an under-appreciated Carny-Noir

17 April 2015 11:39 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Nightmare Alley

Written by Jules Furthman

Directed by Edmund Goulding

U.S.A., 1947

A carny cons his way up to high society through cold-reading and (un)timely circumstance. Based on that one-liner, who would you cast? If you say Tyrone Power, I’d say that my friend Stan Carlisle is on his way (The name Stan Carlisle being a con-industry handshake of sorts, informing one con-artist that he’s stepping in on another man’s con, or at least according to Eddie “The Czar of Noir” Muller’s introduction of this film at Tcmff). In Nightmare Alley, Tyrone Power, the 20th Century Fox matinee idol, plays a lowlife con man, who lies and cheats his way from a podunk carnival to becoming a spiritualist amongst the more gullible of Chicago’s upper crust. His character is also the namesake of the above con slang.

And any which way, yes, Tyrone Power »

- Diana Drumm

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Smith to Have One of His Worst Domestic Openings Ever: 'Focus'

1 March 2015 1:58 AM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'Focus' movie: Will Smith has third weakest weekend box-office debut of his career (photo: Will Smith in 'Focus') According to those referred to in polite society as "conservatives," winter storms and freezing temperatures are evidence that there's no such thing as global warming. Let's not even go there. Instead, let's focus (bad pun intended) on the Focus movie starring Will Smith and Margot Robbie as a con couple, which opened below expectations – with wintery weather as a possible culprit – in North America this weekend, February 27-March 1, 2015. According to box-office tracking, as late as a couple of days ago Warner Bros.' modestly budgeted Focus was expected to take in between $22-24 million. Barring a miracle akin to a sudden halt to rising ocean temperatures (pardon the hyperbole), that's not about to happen. Now, before I proceed: "modestly budgeted"? Well, for a Will Smith movie, $50 million – after »

- Zac Gille

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Review: Robert Altman's "The Long Goodbye" (1973) Starring Elliot Gould; Blu-ray Release From Kino Lorber

26 February 2015 8:46 PM, PST | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

Rip Van Marlowe

By Raymond Benson

Robert Altman was a very quirky director, sometimes missing the mark, but oftentimes brilliant. His 1973 take on Raymond Chandler’s 1953 novel The Long Goodbye is a case in point. It might take a second viewing to appreciate what’s really going on in the film. Updating what is essentially a 1940s film noir character to the swinging 70s was a risky and challenging prospect—and Altman and his star, Elliott Gould as Philip Marlowe (!), pull it off.

It’s one of those pictures that critics hated when it was first released; and yet, by the end of the year, it was being named on several Top Ten lists. I admit that when I first saw it in 1973, I didn’t much care for it. I still wasn’t totally in tune with the kinds of movies Altman made—even after M*A*S*H, »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Desecrating Pynchon. Inherent Vice Arrives on DVD

24 February 2015 5:43 AM, PST | www.culturecatch.com | See recent CultureCatch news »

There are films that make you want to run to the bookstore or, in reality, Amazon.com. Any Jane Austen or Dickens adaptation. Atonement. Requiem for a Dream perhaps.

Then there is Paul Thomas Anderson's adaptation of Thomas Pynchon's Inherent Vice starring Joaquin Phoenix, Josh Brolin, Owen Wilson, Martin Short, Reese Witherspoon, Maya Rudolph, and Benicio Del Toro, plus a bevy of other game thespians. This adaptation has a contrary effect. It makes you want to hightail it to the incinerator with every Pynchon paperback you might own. Farewell, V. Sayonara, Gravity's Rainbow.

But before I get too critical, let me just note that this apparently was a project of love for Anderson. Anyone who would tackle Pynchon's verbiage and hope to get a slightly comprehensible screenplay out of it would only do so out of an illimitable devotion for the author. Anderson's chance of success, of course, »

- Brandon Judell

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Oscars In Memoriam: The Best Fan Art Honoring Fallen Stars

20 February 2015 9:37 PM, PST | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

ETonline is paying tribute to the stars that passed away in the past year with our "Oscar: In Memoriam" fan art collection. Check out some of the highlights below and check back in on the Et Tumblr page for more.

Photos: In Memoriam: Stars We Lost In 2014

Robin Williams

The legendary comedian committed suicide on August 11, 2014.

http://entertainmenttonight.tumblr.com/post/111579349675/oscars-in-memoriam-et-tumblr-remember-robin

Maya Angelou

The inspirational author and poet passed away on May 28, 2014 at age 86.

http://entertainmenttonight.tumblr.com/post/111580360805/oscars-in-memoriam-et-tumblr-remember-maya

Lauren Bacall

The actress, who was Humphrey Bogart’s real-life wife and on-screen co-star in iconic films like The Big Sleep, passed away one month before her 90th birthday on August 12, 2014.

http://entertainmenttonight.tumblr.com/post/111580366120/oscars-in-memoriam-et-tumblr-remember-lauren

News: Was Joan Rivers Snubbed in the 2015 GRAMMYs In Memoriam Segment?

Joan Rivers

The legendary comedian and fashion critic died at age 81 after complications during surgery on September 4, 2014.

http://entertainmenttonight.tumblr.com/post/111583267412/oscars-in-memoriam-et-tumblr-remember-joan

James Garner

The Maverick and Rockford »

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Blu-ray Review – The Killing (1956)

9 February 2015 3:23 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

The Killing, 1956.

Directed by Stanley Kubrick.

Starring Sterling Hayden, Coleen Gray, Vince Edwards, Jay C.Flippen, Elisha Cook Jr, Marie Windsor, Ted de Corsia and Timothy Carey.

Synopsis:

Seven men are intent on executing the perfect robbery and taking a racetrack for two million dollars. But nothing goes quite as planned…

Kubrick’s third feature was something of a make or break for him. Given what happened following its release that may sound somewhat ridiculous, but in the film world of the mid-1950’s Kubrick, even at the incredibly young age of 28, truly needed a project that would show off his clear-eyed vision and premium levels of creativity and storytelling. His previous two features, Fear and Desire (1953) and Killers Kiss (1955) (also included as an extra on this release) had met with limited success, both financial and critical. The master-waiting-to-happen had to have a project to really put everything at his disposal into. »

- Robert W Monk

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Inherent Vice, film review: Joaquin Phoenix and Owen Wilson star in a brilliant and strange modern Hollywood noir

28 January 2015 7:57 AM, PST | The Independent | See recent The Independent news »

Watching Paul Thomas Anderson’s wonderfully textured and intricate La-set Inherent Vice, you are easily reminded of the famous story about Howard Hawks’ version of The Big Sleep (1946). A baffled Hawks and his collaborators wrote to author Raymond Chandler asking whether a chauffeur in the story was murdered or had committed suicide and were gratified when Chandler wrote back saying he didn't "know either." »

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Barry Levinson on Oscar’s Racial Controversy (Exclusive)

20 January 2015 3:40 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Director Barry Levinson offers his thoughts on what’s behind the growing outcry for more diversity in Hollywood films.

Are we a racist country? Yes. But we are getting better. For certain. And while that battle for absolute equality is being played out, an odd controversy about the racial injustice in the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences has emerged. The Oscar nominations of 2015 are being questioned as racially prejudicial. There are those who say a black woman, who directed “Selma,” was overlooked because of racial bias, and the actor who played Martin Luther King Jr. was also overlooked because he was black. The film was nominated by the Academy, but these individuals were not. I would tend to agree with these accusations if I thought the Academy had a great record of selecting the best nominees each year, but they don’t. It is impossible to pass through a single awards season without hearing, »

- Barry Levinson

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Review: “St. Ives” (1976) Starring Charles Bronson And Jacqueline Bisset; Warner Archive Streaming Service

2 January 2015 3:07 AM, PST | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

By Don Stradley

Charles Bronson was 55 at the time of “St Ives” (1976). He was just a couple years past his star-making turn in “Death Wish”, and was enjoying a surprising run of success. I say surprising because Bronson had, after all, been little more than a craggy second banana for most of his career. Now, inexplicably, he had box office clout as a leading man. In fact, Bronson reigned unchallenged for a few years as the most popular male actor in international markets. Yes, even bigger than Eastwood, Newman, Reynolds, Redford, or any other 1970s star you can name. Many of Bronson’s movies were partly financed by foreign investors, for even if his movies didn’t score stateside, they still drew buckets of money in Prague or Madrid. Some have suggested that his popularity on foreign screens was due to how little he said in his movies (there was »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2004 | 2001

10 items from 2015


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